Definition of Lombard in English:

Lombard

noun

  • 1A member of a Germanic people who invaded Italy in the 6th century.

    • ‘The Lombards thought the city was under a major attack.’
    • ‘He reorganized papal estates for Rome's supply, centralizing their administration through appointments, paid imperial troops, appointed officers, and negotiated with the Lombards.’
    • ‘The adoption of fusionist policies by Lombards and Venetians alike proved futile.’
    • ‘The French urged the Lombards to wait, but they could not prevail.’
    • ‘Across those Alps, in the 6th century, came a Germanic tribe called the Lombards.’
    • ‘Before he could return, the Lombards invaded Italy and he hastened to Rome at the request of the Pope.’
    • ‘In 568 the Lombards invaded, a people even more wantonly destructive than the Vandals.’
    • ‘After the fall of Ancient Rome and the barbarian invasions, Genoa was occupied by the Lombards, a Germanic tribe, in 642.’
    • ‘The Lombards had moved into Italy in the later 500s, destroying what was left of the Gothic kingdom and establishing their own.’
    • ‘Other modern states are said to have begun with the movements of the Lombards, the Anglo-Saxons and the Magyars.’
    • ‘By 565, Roman Italy was invaded and overtaken by the Lombards.’
    • ‘Christianity had grown in influence even before the Lombards came to Italy, and by the end of the seventh century most Lombards were Catholics (perhaps with a tinge of syncretism in many cases).’
  • 2A native of Lombardy in northern Italy.

  • 3[mass noun] The Italian dialect of Lombardy.

adjective

  • Relating to Lombardy, or to the Lombards or their language.

    • ‘Even Ostrogoth and Lombard kings, their barbarian ways tamed by the people they were supposed to have conquered, built houses in Bellagio.’
    • ‘What happened to the Romans under Lombard rule?’
    • ‘Thus there were peasant uprisings throughout the Lombard plains over the summer of 1796, some of them resulting in massacres of isolated French units.’
    • ‘On Friday, with suitable fanfare, the 29th Alpine World Ski Championships will open in the small Lombard town of Bormio, and over the following fortnight, anybody with a passing interest in ski racing will be in for a treat.’
    • ‘This enraged the Lombard king, Desiderius, who immediately began conspiring to harm Charles however he might.’
    • ‘Upon learning of the Lombard expedition, he set out almost at once, crossing the Bosporus on 24 June and setting out in pursuit.’
    • ‘Beltrami's research on Leonardo's Lombard career went hand in hand with his reconstruction and restoration of Leonardo-related architectural sites.’
    • ‘Until recently the lender, based in the Lombard city of Lodi, was notable only for its acquisitions of much smaller players.’
    • ‘The focus of this opera, however, is Bertarido, the exiled Lombard king.’

Origin

From Italian lombardo, representing late Latin Langobardus, of Germanic origin, from the base of long + the ethnic name Bardi.

Pronunciation:

Lombard

/ˈlɒmbəd/