Definition of locum in English:

locum

noun

British
  • A person who stands in temporarily for someone else of the same profession, especially a cleric or doctor.

    • ‘He retired from the NHS when he was 65 but was his own locum for while.’
    • ‘We excluded doctors not in training grades and locums who had been in post less than two weeks.’
    • ‘After house officer posts he entered general practice as a locum and then took up a definitive post in the Markets area of Belfast.’
    • ‘In reaction to this, the Health Professions Council said that a registered doctor may employ locums at his practice who will then be allowed to use the letterheads and premises.’
    • ‘The general practitioners in particular found it difficult to attend training sessions unless locums were provided, and training exercises sometimes had to be repeated.’
    • ‘Restricting them to a 58-hour week could leave hospitals having to rely on foreign medics and locums to work in areas where they do not have specialist knowledge, the British Medical Association warned.’
    • ‘A total of 240 clinicians participated: 152 doctors and 88 nurses, including locums and those working part time.’
    • ‘Doing and repairing episiotomies was one of my routine jobs when I was a locum in obstetrics 25 years ago.’
    • ‘Not only did his organisation provide much-needed on-call services for GP practices, it also provided locums for hospitals, which at that time were short of manpower.’
    • ‘Having been pensioned off in 1982 at the age of 65, he returned to general practice as a locum.’
    • ‘He acted as a locum when he retired and was a member of the local Probus Club, as well as being interested in cookery, wine, and history.’
    • ‘It describes the current procedure for approving employment of locums who are over retirement age as a ‘rubber stamp’ that provides no safeguard for the trust or its patients.’
    • ‘In general practice, men are more prepared to see a registrar or a locum than women and seem to place less store on the doctor-patient relationship than women.’
    • ‘For example, monitoring of particular subgroups of general practitioners, such as locums, assistants, and those caring for people in hospices, may be difficult if not impossible.’
    • ‘The three consultant obstetricians who work as locums at the unit handle about 20 cases each a year, which, by anybody's calculation, is not a heavy workload.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the dearth of registrars and locums will make implementation of a new system difficult.’
    • ‘In general practice, locums who cover for colleagues on holiday or study leave are already being advised to report on any deviations from approved standards of practice.’
    • ‘I once worked as a locum for the regular ship's doctor of a large transatlantic passenger liner.’
    • ‘Umpteen years ago, I worked as a locum for an unwell general practitioner in another part of the country.’
    • ‘Other reforms by the government to try to restore public confidence in the medical profession include more rigorous checks of hospital doctors and locums before they are appointed to posts.’

Origin

Early 20th century: short for locum tenens.

Pronunciation

locum

/ˈləʊkəm/