Main definitions of loco in English

: loco1loco2

loco1

noun

informal
  • A locomotive:

    ‘Britain's most famous steam loco’
    [as modifier] ‘loco sheds’
    • ‘He seems to be quite knowledgeable on the subject of steam locos, so I was wondering if he has details and photographs of Canadian Pacific steam locos from years ago.’
    • ‘You'll hear rather than see the unassuming clank of diesel locos sliding in and out of Newton Dale and the more exuberant klaxon and puff, puff, puff of the steam trains.’
    • ‘Four 123 ton locos were added in 1914 and two 125 ton in 1927.’
    • ‘Also, if the motive power used was able to be dual power, ie able to switch from electric to diesel, then, in the event of a power problem, the locos could simply be switched on to the alternative power source and continue the journey.’
    • ‘Since the Nilgiri rack railway was a Swiss invention, the locos that still run it - fitted with extra pistons to work the rack mechanism - were imported from Switzerland.’
    • ‘A coach is solely devoted to locos: steam, diesel and electric.’
    • ‘In the past, Class 47 diesel locos and coaches, which formed services on the West of England line from Waterloo to Exeter and beyond, had been maintained at several depots.’
    • ‘The locomotive was one of 20 similar express steam locos built between 1903 and 1909.’
    • ‘Today, dozens of Britain's greatest steam locos - from the Mallard to the Duchess of Hamilton - are proudly on display at the National Railway Museum in York.’
    • ‘UP sometimes uses these locos to drop off and pick up from the old station yard, (which replaced the first station in the 60's,) when the Idaho Falls yard is full.’
    • ‘In the case of the locos on the St Chamond, there are four large driving wheels on each side and two pairs of smaller wheels forward of the drive wheels.’
    • ‘The historic journey marked the end of 150 years of steam trains on the Manchester to London line, although main-line service steam locos from Manchester stopped in 1968.’
    • ‘Similarly, four diesel locos were also acquired for support and maintenance trains; and the coaches were acquired from 2 foot 6 inch gauge railroads in western and eastern Europe.’
    • ‘The new diesel locos and guards' brake vans will be provided with these features.’
    • ‘It think this nostalgia was the inspiration for my Jubilee Garden design and because Ben had driven one of the locos in the museum.’
    • ‘The locomotives derailed just outside Smardale station and, as the locos were going in reverse at the time, the pilot engine turned onto its side and slithered down the embankment.’
    • ‘Visitors will be able to ride behind legendary locos, visit the Great Railway Bazaar, enjoy a steam fair, folk singers, vintage films, refreshments and a display of the modern railway giving a snapshot of its current structure.’
    • ‘This view that steam locos were ‘alive’ was not limited to male workers but also shared by their sons who were permitted to visit the shops on special occasions.’
    • ‘In common with other locomotives on these lines, the new ones are ‘rack only’ - unlike ‘rack and adhesion’ locomotives there is no facility to run them as adhesion locos where the grades are easy.’
    • ‘Jennifer, the 1942-built steam tank engine named after a Stokesley teacher's wife, was one of the first locos to join the railway when it opened in 1973.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

loco

/ˈləʊkəʊ/

Main definitions of loco in English

: loco1loco2

loco2

adjective

informal
  • Crazy.

    • ‘On the couch one evening, our loco analysand is seized by an uncontrollable passion for the ancient medico.’
    • ‘If true, this would not only be one of the most loco funding stories, but it gives more credence to the idea of a poker bubble, in which everyone and their mother is either playing poker or launching some kind of poker venture.’
    • ‘Along with five equally loco Norwegians and a parrot, he survives on fish that literally hurl themselves on deck, meets up with a few sharks, and endures a beaching in Tahiti.’
    • ‘A haywire fembot goes loco at a square-dance; another gets post-coital mammary enlargement via remote control.’
    • ‘It proves that too much sun makes you loco - but in the nicest way.’
    severely mentally ill, mentally ill, insane, mad, certifiable, deranged, demented, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, not in one's right mind, not together, crazed, maniac, maniacal, lunatic, unbalanced, unhinged, unstable, disturbed, distracted, stark mad, manic, frenzied, raving, distraught, frantic, hysterical, delirious, mad as a hatter, mad as a march hare
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: from Spanish, insane.

Pronunciation:

loco

/ˈləʊkəʊ/