Definition of loanword in English:

loanword

noun

  • A word adopted from a foreign language with little or no modification.

    • ‘Katakana are used for foreign loanwords from languages other than Chinese; most of these come from English.’
    • ‘The Malay word may also have been introduced to the Tongans by the Dutch themselves, as many Malay loanwords were already current in 17th century Dutch.’
    • ‘So it's a surprise to find that some languages have few loanwords.’
    • ‘Secondly, we see the impact of the language contact between Irish and English and the use of several English loanwords, which have been successfully adapted to Irish spelling and pronunciation.’
    • ‘Romance and Spanish have been filled with Arabic loanwords, be they chemical, culinary, agricultural, technological, social or scientific.’
    • ‘(The Greeks, who are the ultimate source of the loanword ‘partridge,’ presumably gave it this name because of the loud whirring sound it makes when suddenly flushed out.)’
    • ‘Northern pronunciation varies from southern and has more Russian loanwords.’
    • ‘Instead, slang and universal loanwords are used, a so-called ‘globespeak.’’
    • ‘Indeed, the possibility that it was originally a Luwian loanword hints at its much greater antiquity.’
    • ‘Similarly, Eskimo Jargon has kaukau ‘food’, itself a loanword in Hawaiian, introduced from Chinese Pidgin English chowchow.’
    • ‘As a widely used loanword, ‘sex’ may also denote a certain cultural perception, real or imagined, often connected with Anglo-American-derived consumer culture - assumedly more easy-going, relaxed, and fun.’
    • ‘Wanganui-born English scholar Robert Burchfield in The English Language debunks the ‘enduring myth about French loanwords of the mediaeval period’, saying that ‘the culinary revolution’ scarcely preceded the 18th century.’
    • ‘Letendre has found that ‘most Japanese teachers had no clear idea what adolescence was and that many failed to recognize the English loanword adoresensu’.’
    • ‘The Omani dialect generally is close to modern standard Arabic, although coastal dialects employ a number of loanwords from Baluchi, Persian, Urdu and Gujarati (two Indo-Aryan languages), and even Portuguese.’
    • ‘In this respect, one may compare the Persian Language to English which although Germanic in its foundations has numerous loanwords from French and Latin, mostly because of the Roman and the Norman invasions.’
    • ‘The loanwords normally used to avoid this problem do not prove feasible in the case of John 4: 4-42.’
    • ‘It would thus have been a loanword from Hebrew in the vulgar speech of the Greek settlers in Egypt.’

Pronunciation

loanword

/ˈləʊnwəːd/