Definition of living in English:

living

noun

  • 1[usually in singular] An income sufficient to live on or the means of earning it:

    ‘she was struggling to make a living as a dancer’
    ‘what does he do for a living?’
    • ‘On a very basic level, you seem ignorant of what you and I do for a living.’
    • ‘The yield may not be large but farmers manage to feed their family and make a living.’
    • ‘We don't mind how you ride waves, or where, or why, or how often, where you live, or what you do for a living.’
    • ‘They were never rich, but our grandparents managed to work long, hard hours to raise a family and make a living.’
    • ‘Before the family group stayed together and tried to make a living.’
    • ‘Many men and women came to these cities from rural poverty, hoping to find a decent living.’
    • ‘Artificial government intervention is what you happen to do for a living.’
    • ‘Also, more than one in four Hispanic families earns a living below the national poverty level.’
    • ‘You take a guy who works hard all week trying to raise a family and earn a living.’
    • ‘But as I said, I'm aware of the problems earning enough money to make a living.’
    • ‘Children do not have free time, since they must help their families make a living.’
    • ‘This is real freedom, the freedom for a person - or a nation - to make a living.’
    • ‘There are men who like much older women, but there aren't enough of them for a girl to make a proper living.’
    • ‘And what does this lady do for a living to get a nickname like that?’
    • ‘Like their counterparts in the drug trade, the people smugglers seek to make a living from other people's misery.’
    • ‘At this juncture a small living is offered to Edward, and the way seems open for his marriage with Lucy.’
    • ‘Would that tell you how many partners I might have had, what TV shows I watch, and what I might do for a living?’
    • ‘The gift of a sheep will provide a small farming family with the means to make a living.’
    • ‘Unable to find enough energy to hit a ball his confidence drained away and, with no income, he took a job folding clothes and stacking shelves for a living.’
    • ‘Many of the ballet artistes continue performing because it is too late for them to look to any other profession to make a living.’
    livelihood, income, source of income, means of support, means, subsistence, keep, maintenance, sustenance, nourishment, daily bread, upkeep
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    1. 1.1British (in church use) a position as a vicar or rector with an income or property:
      ‘he was offered the living of St Katherine's’
      • ‘Edward was a younger son, and - after ordination - was given the living at Lowick.’
      • ‘The second is the Black Death, in which half the livings in the Church changed hands - which tells one something about its impact.’
      • ‘In 1487, eager to appease France, Pope Innocent VIII granted James III an ‘indult’, giving him the right to prefer to Scottish livings and higher Church posts.’
      • ‘Perhaps as many as 3,000 Anglican clergy lost their livings and had the Presbyterian form of church government survived, as it ultimately did in Scotland, the Anglicans would have finished up as dissenters.’
      • ‘He first acquired the vicarage of Sutton-on-the-Forest, later gaining a second living at Stillington.’
      • ‘Ordained in 1675, Flamsteed received the income of the living of Burstow, Surrey from 1684.’
      • ‘In 1560 he took holy orders, and the following year resigned his post at Ely Cathedral in order to take up a living at Doddington in the Isle of Ely.’
  • 2[mass noun], [with adjective or noun modifier] The pursuit of a lifestyle of the specified type:

    ‘the benefits of country living’
    • ‘Other people may think that our habits of daily living are trivial and stupid, but to us they concern surviving as a person.’
    • ‘The Resource Group for Deafened People plan to demonstrate how hearing appliances can make daily living easier.’
    • ‘We then calculated degree of cognitive impairment, function in activities of daily living, and behavioural disturbances.’
    • ‘Our councils are already doing a fantastic job of developing lifestyle choices and active living.’
    • ‘Lesson No 3: thrifty living means getting closer to your neighbourhood.’
    • ‘For all the excitement of modern life on your doorstep, city centre living cannot be beaten.’
    • ‘Now confined to bed or a wheel chair, he was completely dependent on staff for all activities of daily living.’
    • ‘Standards of living and lifestyles also became very similar in rural and urban areas.’
    • ‘She is the newest addition to the long list of star ambassadors preaching the benefits of healthy living.’
    • ‘The huge growth of inner-city apartment living has seen Port Jackson's enrolment soar in recent years.’
    • ‘Aches and pains and sore muscles are almost synonymous with sporting and recreational activities, and just day-to-day living.’
    • ‘She says communal living suits her better than any white picket fence in the suburbs could.’
    • ‘Indoor living meets outdoor lifestyle on both levels of the house.’
    way of life, lifestyle, manner of living, way of living, mode of living, life
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adjective

  • 1Alive:

    ‘living creatures’
    ‘flowers were for the living’
    • ‘God makes fowl and whales and every living creature.’
    • ‘Anyone who is among the living has hope - even a live dog is better off than a dead lion!’
    • ‘These enter the bodies of living creatures, but cannot be removed.’
    • ‘I have a basic difficulty in forming a meaningful connection with any living creature who cannot communicate in coherent sentences.’
    • ‘The garden was a living, breathing, creature that now seemed intent upon swallowing her up.’
    • ‘The biological information of a living organism is biological information.’
    • ‘He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end.’
    • ‘For their sake, he made them all perish in the next instant, dying as quick as a living creature could possibly.’
    • ‘Because yeast is a living organism, it breathes, grows and changes over time.’
    • ‘But once you have a living reproducing thing, you then have selection coming into play.’
    • ‘It has nothing to do with the sex of a living creature.’
    • ‘Luke 16, clearly illustrates that an impassable gulf separates the dead from the living.’
    • ‘Biotechnology is the use of living organisms or biological substances to discover or produce therapeutic remedies.’
    • ‘Druids believed that souls of the dead returned to their former homes to be entertained by the living.’
    • ‘They also had this machine that replicated food so that no living creature had to be killed to keep them alive.’
    • ‘The survivors often say God saved them but if he chose to save the living, did he choose to kill the lost?’
    • ‘The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, Why do you look for the living among the dead?’
    • ‘We suspect that the way we treat the bodies of the dead is inevitably linked to how we treat the bodies of the living.’
    • ‘For to this end Christ died and lived again, that he might be Lord both of the dead and of the living.’
    • ‘I sit beside a rockpool, watching the tiny shells of living creatures, hundreds of them, going about their lives.’
    alive, live, having life
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    1. 1.1[attributive] (of a place) used for living rather than working in:
      ‘the living quarters of the pub’
      • ‘My childhood room constituted the perfect living space because I'd never known anything else.’
      • ‘I have my own living place and a new career, so things are really looking up.’
      • ‘These include kitchens, eating areas, living places, bathing facilities and so on.’
      • ‘The entire site is considered living space, with rooms formed both inside and out.’
      • ‘Down below was an open kitchen, dining room and living space, with a corner fire place.’
      • ‘A good deck transports you to another world, or at the very least extends your living space outdoors.’
      • ‘Washing hands and cleaning the living place become the new habits.’
      • ‘There will also have sliding doors separating the second bedroom from a reception room so that the living space can be extended if needed.’
      • ‘They stretch their living space into public passageways or speak loudly at midnight.’
      • ‘So, CRT and widescreen meet only if you're willing to give up many cubic feet of your living space to accommodate them.’
      • ‘This type of building is seen mainly as a workshop, rather than as a living space, an idea borne out by the many loom weights found in these types of buildings.’
      • ‘There is a rumpus room and the living area is very spacious and has air-conditioning for your comfort.’
      • ‘A porch off the great room extends the living space out to a courtyard with a dipping pool and deluxe alfresco kitchen.’
      • ‘Here the view itself provided the catalyst as Ron created a living space offering a backdrop to the panorama, rather than the other way round.’
      • ‘More common than Internet is satellite TV, found in nearly every living area in the country.’
      • ‘Its mass and opacity, rather than walls, separate the main bedroom from the living area.’
      • ‘A blog is a sort of extended living area and it's strange how the energy exchange you take part in there can affect you in your real life.’
      • ‘Even if one has left his native place, he continues to perform ritualistic practices at his present living place.’
      • ‘The living area includes a central open fireplace with space either side for bookcases or shelving units.’
      • ‘The aim of the scheme is to improve the city environment and make better use of living space.’
    2. 1.2 (of a language) still spoken and used.
      • ‘A living language both accumulates new words of value and preserves what is old and of value.’
      • ‘Unlike Latin, classical Arabic is still a living language, existing parallel to the dialects.’
      • ‘Each living language has implicit in it something analogous to a scientific paradigm, the system of thinking and memory that supports a way of life.’
      • ‘There have been brief illuminating instances of the living language over the years.’
      • ‘The Basque language, also known as Euskera, is Europe's oldest living language.’
      • ‘All living languages borrow from other languages, both living and dead, and always have done.’
      • ‘If Irish is to survive as a living language, young people must be able to secure work in the Gaeltachts.’
      • ‘English is a living language but it will only stand so much abuse.’
      • ‘It can only be good to hear that ours is a living, flourishing language that will live on in all our communities for ever.’
      • ‘English is a living language and as long as it is good communication, then why not use it.’
      • ‘He later goes to the Basque country and is exposed to the living language.’
      • ‘Mrs Braham said the living languages evenings are a great way to encourage pupils to learn a new language.’
      • ‘Moreover, Irish had been a living language in a number of Protestant areas.’
      • ‘When that happens, it ceases to be a living, spoken language, as happened to Sanskrit.’
      • ‘However, like all living language, this one is open to some resistance, albeit a somewhat piecemeal one.’
      current, contemporary, present
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    3. 1.3literary [attributive] (of water) perennially flowing:
      ‘streams of living water’
      • ‘This side of the eschaton the Spirit pours forth living waters, filled with novelty.’
      • ‘They search far and wide to uncover the living waters and long to drink the passion of life.’
      • ‘The metaphor of the people being like trees planted by streams of living water is familiar in Jeremiah.’
      • ‘Just as water renews the parched ground, so this living water renews the servant.’
      • ‘He says to this woman that he has the gift of living water for her.’

Pronunciation:

living

/ˈlɪvɪŋ/