Definition of litigate in English:

litigate

verb

[no object]
  • 1Resort to legal action to settle a matter; be involved in a lawsuit.

    ‘the plaintiff is prepared to litigate’
    • ‘You have a very limited right of appeal on a point of law, or the wrongful reception of evidence, not the general appeal that you would have had if you had litigated in the Supreme Court of South Australia.’
    • ‘A purpose of pre-action disclosure is to assist those who need disclosure as a vital step in deciding whether to litigate at all or to provide a vital ingredient in the pleading of their case.’
    • ‘The Claimant would then have to litigate in England against the English Defendant and in Germany against the German Defendant.’
    • ‘And as it found, litigating against the government's antitrust legal eagles can be a long, drawn-out affair.’
    • ‘It is not an abuse of process merely to require a litigant to litigate in a tribunal of a Convention country if that tribunal in fact has jurisdiction under the convention.’
    • ‘Between 1998 and 2000, she litigated seven sweat-patch cases on behalf of clients accused of violating their supervised release by using drugs.’
    • ‘We can win it only if we do not force our forces to fight in a legal fog, constantly speculating and litigating piecemeal about what the law might be.’
    • ‘It would not be fair or reasonable to force the Plaintiffs to continue to litigate against their will merely on the basis that they commenced a class proceeding.’
    • ‘Tenants have a statutory right to litigate and the Roberts were entitled to regard that right jealously.’
    • ‘It is expensive to litigate in defamation, even in the smaller cases, let alone monster cases like this.’
    • ‘To begin with, prisoners are among the least lucrative of clients, and certainly the least sympathetic to juries, so that few lawyers are willing to litigate on their behalf.’
    • ‘It may also help some who have insisted on litigating, but don't really want to, to be able to accept the Fund offer without, at the same time, feeling they are sacrificing their right to know.’
    • ‘At the same time, the church has every incentive to litigate, because the litigation is cost-free.’
    • ‘After all, the very reason why parties conclude an arbitration agreement is because they do not wish to litigate in the Courts.’
    • ‘They do not need a power which deprives a litigant of his right to litigate.’
    • ‘The jurisdiction point having been abandoned by negotiations, the parties would have been free to litigate in whatever jurisdiction was willing to accept jurisdiction for the proceedings.’
    • ‘I could not litigate under the Trade Practices Act before this Court of law because I would be duplicating the proceeding.’
    • ‘Men plow fields, cut grain, litigate in court, and serve in the local militia.’
    • ‘One does not take away that choice by permitting, encouraging or preventing the exhortation of the citizen to litigate or not to litigate.’
    • ‘As well the added burden of Ms Cook's ill health caused her to be disinclined to litigate.’
    oppose, object to, challenge, dispute, take a stand against, resist, defy, strive against, struggle against, take issue with
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Take (a claim or a dispute) to a law court.
      ‘even a claim which is litigated and defended successfully involves high legal costs’
      • ‘I need legal representation to litigate this matter.’
      • ‘Many of the issues litigated in the family justice system require open and public debate in the media.’
      • ‘The bankruptcy does not affect his ability to litigate such claims.’
      • ‘Clients are free to reject the advice and insist that cases be litigated.’
      • ‘This treaty addresses many liability issues that attorneys would be involved in litigating.’
      • ‘It would be mischievous to continue to litigate, pending arbitration, matters which depend so much on the facts which form the basis of the arbitration.’
      • ‘The test is not what would have happened had the matter been litigated.’
      • ‘Most of the new rules allocate parental status without the need to litigate the issue.’
      • ‘These paragraphs, as pleaded, are the framework within which that court foresaw the spoliation issues being litigated.’
      • ‘I think it is, your Honour, but that issue was never litigated.’
      • ‘The question of whether employees can sign away their rights to litigate wage claims collectively is not going away.’
      • ‘Instead of fighting it and litigating every claim, they start with an apology and move to mediation.’
      • ‘Their decision not to litigate the claim was deliberate.’
      • ‘They remove the presumption of innocence, they remove an accused person's right to have the matter litigated in court, it removes the State's obligation to prove a case beyond reasonable doubt.’
      • ‘However, as more private investment groups invest in litigation support, the issue has begun to get litigated more and more.’
      • ‘That is a matter which lies at the heart of the very issue that the appellant seeks to litigate and for that reason it is not a fact which should be relied upon on a summary judgment application.’
      • ‘It would be an abuse of process to litigate these claims again in Ontario.’
      • ‘Now, let's say litigating the case has gone beyond those 100 hours.’
      • ‘This is the sole issue that that organisation really could litigate in the courts.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin litigat- ‘disputed in a lawsuit’, from the verb litigare, from lis, lit- ‘lawsuit’.

Pronunciation

litigate

/ˈlɪtɪɡeɪt/