Definition of lisp in English:

lisp

noun

  • A speech defect in which s is pronounced like th in thick and z is pronounced like th in this.

    ‘he spoke with a slight lisp’
    • ‘Consequently, treatment of lisps is best accomplished by speech therapy.’
    • ‘I could have just written a hundred pages of lisps and grunts and the film would have came out exactly the same.’
    • ‘She had the slightest hint of a lisp, and so the last word came out of her mouth sounding like ‘thresses.’’
    • ‘Each character is hideously depicted via limp dialogue, grating accents, silly lisps, unnatural body movements, and an overall disagreeable personality.’
    • ‘Each pause was highlighted, every sound a lisp.’
    • ‘"He's awake now, " she said proudly, with a slight lisp.’
    • ‘He had a slight lisp and his right hand had a way of flopping around a bit.’
    • ‘They were the ones who gave me a hard time about my braces and my lisp and… well… everything.’
    • ‘I should mention now that I have a slight lisp.’
    • ‘Drew was missing his two front baby teeth and had possessed a slight lisp from birth, causing his s's to come out as th's.’
    • ‘He would often practise his speeches for many hours and had a slight stammer and lisp.’
    • ‘Then he talked about how I lisped and how you can't trust anyone with a lisp.’
    • ‘You think they'd notice if you had six fingers, or a lisp, or if you were two feet shorter?’
    • ‘The class waited, all attention, pretending to be helpful, ready for the slightest weakness, a lisp, a twitch, wariness, ready to move in for the kill.’
    • ‘Many of the loyal troops would have joined the revolt if the rebels had shown more activity, but on-the-spot leadership was provided by a high-voiced officer with a lisp, who failed to change the rebels' plan and seize the initiative.’
    • ‘In fact he had a curiously dry - albeit pleasant - soft spoken voice that was more soothing than intimidating, and he even had a slight lisp.’
    • ‘The splint holding my tooth in has given me a slight lisp, that achey feeling in the gum line from the forcing of the tooth and the annoyingly protracted brushing process that I used to hate.’
    • ‘Among the aspiring singers were those with cracked voices, nasal tones, and lisps.’
    • ‘‘His lisp was a natural speech impediment, but I think [the producers] were concerned over how it would be received,’ he says.’
    • ‘His school uniform always looked a mess and, according to friends, he jabbered rather than talked clearly, having inherited a slight lisp from his father.’
    speech defect, speech impediment, stammer, stutter, lisp
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Speak with a lisp.

    ‘she spoke softly, lisping slightly’
    • ‘By the mid-1930s she was a superstar, singing, lisping and tap-dancing her way through such films as Poor Little Rich Girl and Bright Eyes, in which she famously sang On the Good Ship Lollipop.’
    • ‘The inebriated man drew a sword and sloppily lisped out, ‘You embarrreshed me!’’
    • ‘She lisped madly, stretching out her arms and webbed fingers towards John.’
    • ‘If one goes by the findings of behavioural studies, one would think twice before assigning baby-sitting functions for the telly or hold back from going ga ga over the toddler who lisps ad-lib.’
    • ‘Audrey doesn't really lisp, she just knows it makes her irresistibly adorable.’
    • ‘I saw him play more than once at Central Park in New York, his toothless mouth soulfully lisping his unique and beautiful song style.’
    • ‘Then he talked about how I lisped and how you can't trust anyone with a lisp.’
    • ‘If you were a school kid in the 60's, chances are you spent at least one Christmas lisping along with Alvin and the Chipmunks.’
    • ‘‘My mum says we're twins,’ she lisped, shyly holding out her hand.’
    • ‘The third soldier lisped, with a slight Siberian accent, motioning them out with his rifle.’
    • ‘Now if all this is right, and what you've found here is just how humans have evolved to be able to speak the way they do, does it tell you anything about speech pathology, about children who lisp, or anything like that?’
    • ‘In fact I don't think I've ever had anybody that lisped on the program yet.’
    • ‘Chris, for some reason, frequently denies that he lisps, not realising perhaps quite how much we love him for it, but it's like the Atlantic Ocean denying that it contains salt.’
    • ‘He was the kind of guy who would call himself ‘straight - acting’, which meant that he didn't lisp or mince, and wasn't inclined to wear frocks.’
    • ‘‘Man… dey get knock out,’ she lisped, seeing my surprise.’
    • ‘So much for Portia's lisping about the gentle rain that blesseth the giver as well as him that takes!’
    • ‘Luckily, this hasn't happened in a long time and, therefore, I haven't lisped since eighth grade.’
    • ‘Gay males are often more effeminate, yes, but I don't know any females who lisp like that.’
    • ‘His tongue lisped over his fangs as he whispered - the low sound did not suit his gravelly voice well.’
    • ‘‘It has been burning this entire time,’ she lisped, her voice weary, strained.’

Origin

Old English wlispian (recorded in āwlyspian), from wlisp (adjective) lisping, of imitative origin; compare with Dutch lispen and German lispeln.

Pronunciation:

lisp

/lɪsp/

Definition of Lisp in English:

Lisp

noun

  • [mass noun] A high-level computer programming language devised for list processing.

    • ‘Interestingly, they wrote their code primarily in Lisp, an artificial intelligence language most commonly used at universities.’
    • ‘It's a mail reader, news reader, web browser, program development environment, Lisp interpreter and psychotherapist.’
    • ‘His interests also include hiking, amateur radio and programming in Lisp.’
    • ‘A few programming languages - notably Lisp and its offspring - provide integers of unlimited size and exact rationals as built-in data types.’
    • ‘Unless a return object is explicitly specified with the return statement, the last expression evaluated will be returned, as in Lisp.’

Origin

1950s: from lis(t) p(rocessor).

Pronunciation:

Lisp

/lɪsp/