Definition of liquor in English:

liquor

noun

  • 1Alcoholic drink, especially distilled spirits.

    • ‘To him spirituous liquor is a superfluous and dangerous luxury.’
    • ‘At the bar, look for upscale liquor and signature drinks along with a variety of tapas.’
    • ‘Drinking hard liquor and beer both independently contributed to the logistic regression model.’
    • ‘She thought she could smell liquor on his breath, and crossed her arms.’
    • ‘Poteen he explained is a very potent liquor distilled from potatoes.’
    • ‘With their skills at home brewing, they turned its fruit into a particularly intoxicating liquor.’
    • ‘In Connecticut, a 1949 ordinance forbids the storing of town records in any place where liquor is sold.’
    • ‘"I don't know why I'm still here, " I muttered, drinking another malt liquor.’
    • ‘Of course, it didn't help the performances that apparently bootleg liquor flowed freely during the location shooting.’
    • ‘A drink was defined as ‘a glass of wine, bottle of beer, shot glass of liquor, or mixed drink.’’
    • ‘People don't realize that if they order a tall drink they're getting the same amount of liquor as a short drink.’
    • ‘But men are more likely to order alcohol in casual dining restaurants; both men and women drink liquor and wine.’
    • ‘He poured some liquor into the glass and I drank everything down.’
    • ‘The urge was there all right, to buy the cheapest illegal liquor and get drunk in the afternoon.’
    • ‘Next, make sure all liquor, beer and wine is stored in a secured area.’
    • ‘They should stop smoking tobacco and avoid drinking hard liquor.’
    • ‘Distilled liquor (including whisky) is unknown in Europe before the 13 th century AD.’
    • ‘Help your partner stay away from beer, wine, wine coolers, liquor and mixed drinks.’
    • ‘Consider drinking beer instead of hard liquor or wine.’
    • ‘I could smell the liquor on his breath, and I recoiled, disgusted.’
    alcohol, spirits, alcoholic drink, strong drink, drink, intoxicating liquor, intoxicant
    View synonyms
  • 2A liquid produced or used in a process, in particular.

    1. 2.1Liquid in which something has been steeped or cooked.
      • ‘A lot of popular spicy dishes require the ingredients to be marinated in a liquor for a few hours or overnight.’
      • ‘These had been slightly glazed with concentrated poaching liquor and dusted with what tasted like ground-down, caramelised peach crisps.’
    2. 2.2Liquid which drains from food during cooking.
      • ‘They are more similar to dried beans than either crowder or black-eyed peas, and make a clear liquor when cooked.’
      • ‘After the required period of time, press-strain the herbs through a fine cloth and store the liquor for use.’
      • ‘Imagine you are making jam and have gotten to the point where you pour the steaming liquor of fruit, sugar, and pectin into the jars.’
      • ‘Strain over a wide jug and retain the liquor, discarding the peppercorns.’
    3. 2.3The liquid from which a substance has been crystallized or extracted.
      • ‘The coolers often contained rods or branches to increase the surface area on which the liquor could crystallise.’
    4. 2.4Water used in brewing.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Dress (leather) with grease or oil.

  • 2Steep (something, especially malt) in water.

Phrasal Verbs

  • be/get liquored up

    • Be or get drunk.

      ‘he got liquored up again on Friday’
      • ‘This from a sixty-year old man who still gets liquored up and crashed his ex-wife's wedding.’
      • ‘But we did make plans to go out a couple of weeks later and had a grand old time partying together, getting liquored up and doing karaoke.’
      • ‘He liked getting liquored up and doing battle - his memos to various magazines reek of alcohol but are readable for their truth and their boozy wit.’
      • ‘Face it; when Canada Day rolls around, nothing else will do, unless of course you're also partial to getting liquored up and rampaging down Whyte Avenue.’
      • ‘But getting liquored up is not the only way a non-believer can derive entertainment out of this ancient excuse for a Saturday morning space opera.’
      • ‘I can readily imagine my anscestors getting liquored up and charging off to fight 600 against 100,000 in certain knowledge of defeat.’
      • ‘Of the night before his first college game, age 17, he said, ‘We got liquored up because the beer was there and because we could.’’
      • ‘Everyone except for Terri and Guy proceed to get liquored up.’
      • ‘My father wouldn't let me drive the Porsche but I knew if we all went in one car, once my parents were liquored up, they would give me their keys to drive them home.’
      • ‘That and I'm having it in a bar, so the audience will have a chance to get liquored up before I go on, which can only make me funnier.’
      intoxicated, inebriated, drunken, befuddled, incapable, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence, maudlin
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (denoting liquid or something to drink): from Old French lic(o)ur, from Latin liquor; related to liquare liquefy, liquere be fluid.

Pronunciation:

liquor

/ˈlɪkə/