noun

  • 1A relationship between two things or situations, especially where one affects the other:

    ‘a commission to investigate a link between pollution and forest decline’
    • ‘The most in-depth study ever conducted into the links between drugs, street prostitution and homelessness in Glasgow is to be published on Friday.’
    • ‘Police in Salisbury are investigating links with an armed robbery in Amesbury, after a man was seen with a handgun last week.’
    • ‘In these circumstances, and without more, it seems to me that the necessary causal link is sufficiently established.’
    • ‘Dieticians say the survey shows the clear link between obesity and deprivation.’
    • ‘Police were yesterday investigating possible links with a knife attack in nearby London Fields last Thursday.’
    • ‘Further research will be necessary to determine the direction of causality of that link and to investigate possible links with aggressive behavior.’
    • ‘The work will look at what else in the body is affected by anti-inflammatory drugs to identify potential links with bowel cancer.’
    • ‘Our results suggest a possible causal link between airborne particulate matter from traffic and chronic respiratory symptoms.’
    connection, relationship, relatedness, association, linkage, tie-up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A relationship or connection between people, countries, or organizations:
      ‘he retained strong links with the media’
      • ‘The spokesman said one of the conditions of the company continuing their contract was that he severed links with the company.’
      • ‘She will tell universities they must forge closer links with their local communities and schools.’
      • ‘What is the University doing to forge closer links with the local community?’
      • ‘When that happens we deal with the culprits and we have established good links with the bus company.’
      • ‘This makes it harder to question and challenge the structures and authorities which affect our lives or to make the links with others in similar situations or who will support us.’
      • ‘He omitted to tell investors of his links with some of those companies.’
      • ‘I applaud social, cultural and trading links with our European friends.’
      • ‘For those who want a stable Asia, the interest in establishing close links with Japan should be obvious.’
      • ‘He now has a Birmingham and a Westmead branch as well as links with many other companies.’
      • ‘We are trying to reach as many of our former students and graduates as possible to tell them to come along and meet old friends and renew links with their former college.’
      • ‘All these magazines have deals with the record companies, even personal links with the stars themselves.’
      • ‘Most Pakistani Americans maintain close links with relatives and friends in Pakistan.’
      • ‘At the time, the Arab ambassadors expressed their interest in fostering more business links with Scottish companies.’
      • ‘He also asserted that they had yet to investigate to see if there were any links with some of the executives at the state company.’
      • ‘‘Ken has close links with other company chairmen and chief executives and investors,’ says Park.’
      • ‘It has developed links with 8,500 companies and with all of York and North Yorkshire's secondary schools, and 85 per cent of its primary schools.’
      • ‘He said Bradford had many experts in inter-faith relations and good links with other faith leaders, which made the city the perfect place to deliver training.’
      • ‘The US study found men who do not have many close links with friends and family have higher levels of a blood molecule which indicates inflammation.’
      • ‘Some insurance companies have links with alarm providers and locksmiths who may offer extra discount on the cost of locks or alarms.’
      • ‘A succession of tutors was his only tenuous link with the larger world.’
      bond, tie, attachment, connection, relationship, association, affiliation
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Something that enables communication between people:
      ‘sign language interpreters represent a vital link between the deaf and hearing communities’
      • ‘He has been a beat officer for the past three years and is a vital link between the community and police.’
      • ‘These ‘storyboards’ became powerful communication links for all who walked the Disney halls.’
      • ‘The nurse is the communication link between the doctor and the patient, the patient and the family, and the family and the doctor.’
      • ‘The origins of this project lie in the aspirations of the EU to foster and develop greater links of communication and co-operation between Europeans.’
      • ‘But officers are hoping two separate regiments will preserve many more traditions and close community links which are vital to strong recruitment.’
    3. 1.3 A means of contact, travel, or transport between two places:
      ‘they set up a satellite link with Tokyo’
      ‘a high-speed rail link to the Channel Tunnel’
      • ‘Satellite links will also be useful whenever time is an issue.’
      • ‘Lastly, the state of the rail and road links between Hastings and London is a reason to improve the digital connectivity - making it less necessary to travel.’
      • ‘However, Mr Clark stressed the need to improve road transport links to the airport because of its location.’
      • ‘What's more, secondary ports tend to lack the high-capacity road and rail links that big transport centers demand.’
      • ‘To keep up, we not only must build more effective transportation links, but we must operate them more efficiently.’
      • ‘Roads, rail links, airports, public housing, factories - all subsidised for the central economy - were on the brink of ruin.’
      • ‘While HAPs are unproven, Internet traffic is traveling over geosynchronous satellite links today.’
      • ‘The Teledesic architecture is wireless point-to-point links between a satellite and a fixed station on the ground.’
      • ‘And, he said, some of the planned improvements in existing road and public transport links would make all the difference.’
      • ‘Transportation links by road and water continue to be erratic in Croatia, so flying to Split and taking the ferry remains the most efficient means of getting to and from the island.’
      • ‘Damage to roads and other transport links was extensive, and took many days to repair.’
      • ‘Further, the committee also stated that all the link roads were carrying traffic much above their capacity.’
      • ‘The problem is, they can already do so via commercial services that use satellite links to provide in-flight Wi-Fi access.’
      • ‘Residents are set to fight plans for a proposed link road to ease traffic congestion between Wigan and Atherton.’
      • ‘Each of the flats for the deaf has been set up with a computer video link, enabling the deaf tenants to communicate in sign language with workers in the staff base.’
      • ‘A look at a map will confirm that the ‘natural’ east-west rail and road links converge on Montreal.’
      • ‘Before there were roads or rail links, the colony built a pier so boats could transport people and supplies from Mobile.’
      • ‘An exclusion zone has been declared, and road and transport links nearby have been closed.’
      • ‘From now on, he said, bosses of commerce and industry will have a real say on issues like allocating land for business and housing development, road links and transportation.’
      • ‘Yet, distance is not the only criteria on which to compare the options of VHF and satellite links.’
    4. 1.4Computing A code or instruction which connects one part of a program or an element in a list to another.
      • ‘Sorry I can't post a direct link to any direct article.’
      • ‘One hides its adverts amongst the normal links at the bottom of each page.’
      • ‘Click on the audio link at the bottom of the page.’
      • ‘Do you want to know the best way to obtain inbound links to your web site?’
      • ‘You may republish if you include an active link to the original and leave this notice in place.’
    5. 1.5
      short for hyperlink
  • 2A ring or loop in a chain:

    ‘a chain made of steel links’
    figurative ‘ministers are the vital link in the chain between the civil service and Parliament’
    • ‘Many of the men wear finely-wrought gold rings, like open links of chain, around their necks.’
    • ‘The bay is made up of two parts, like two links in a chain, separated by a coral or sandbar.’
    • ‘He makes a speciality of finding the weak link in the chain.’
    • ‘I am a link in a chain, a bond of connection between persons.’
    • ‘In reality, even in the first links of the chain of causality the causes have already flowed and dissolved beyond the scope of our vision.’
    • ‘The purpose of this study is to provide one missing link in a growing chain of knowledge.’
    • ‘She had me stop and asked me where the original idea behind starting the conversation had originated and we mentally retraced the links in my chain of thought back to the totally innocuous thing that had started it.’
    • ‘That simple purchase, however, was foreordained to be a vital link in the chain of Reformation history in England.’
    • ‘Strengthen the primary and assistance muscles and you'll have no weak links in the chain.’
    • ‘It is important that the Government does not break any links in the chain when implementing the report.’
    • ‘The police know there are people who could provide those vital missing links which would bring the driver to justice.’
    • ‘You start with a problem and you uncover deeper and quiet different contents in the chain of links leading to the deepest cause of the problem you started with.’
    • ‘That earns you a suit of medieval armor and a giant cannonball lashed to your left leg with five links of rusty chain.’
    • ‘It is a tactic he has employed before, but it serves to clarify hidden links in a chain of process and development.’
    • ‘Of the three links in his argument chain, I do not dispute the last.’
    • ‘The other vital link in the chain are the bureaucrats.’
    • ‘I'm swinging so high that the chain links rattle at the top of each arc.’
    • ‘All commands of this chain will keep rotating in the replay loop one by one like links of the chain circled around a rod.’
    • ‘On his right arm just above the elbow he wore several cords, and one chain of metal links, with charms attached to them.’
    • ‘Not all the links in their chain of logic are steel.’
    loop, ring, connection, connective, connector, coupling, joint, knot
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A unit of measurement of length equal to one hundredth of a surveying chain (7.92 inches).

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Make, form, or suggest a connection with or between:

    ‘rumours that linked his name with Judith’
    ‘foreign and domestic policy are linked’
    [no object] ‘she linked up with an artistic group’
    • ‘It linked up with the experiences of the workforce and appealed directly to them.’
    • ‘What links Carnaby Street boutiques with the Hornsey student sit-in of May '68?’
    • ‘The moment we linked up with dogs is probably one of the most crucial events in human history.’
    • ‘As he suggests, linking artistic motivation with money purely to increase the ease of studying copyright would be too simplistic.’
    • ‘It also has a cross border element and is also linked up with schools in Austria and Luxembourg.’
    • ‘Reports suggested the alert was linked to a series of attacks with a white powder being sent to banks across the area.’
    • ‘There was nothing more than anecdotal evidence to suggest illnesses were linked to the scheme.’
    • ‘The liberal view is that linking them together has been a successful policy over a period of decades and that whatever changes may or may not be made to the program should preserve this linkage.’
    • ‘In this connection he links Vermeer's name to that of Canaletto, who is believed to have used the camera extensively and who is also remarkable for his wide-angle perspectives.’
    • ‘The club have linked up with the nearby secondary school in the search for design ideas for next season's new kits.’
    • ‘He went into sports sponsorship full time, setting up deals in football and motor sport, sometimes linking the pair together.’
    • ‘The former Real Madrid ace linked up with his new Middlesbrough team mates for the first time yesterday.’
    • ‘But the fact of the matter is that people, personalities and policy are closely linked.’
    • ‘Several potential mechanisms have been suggested linking cardiovascular disease and death with binge drinking and alcohol withdrawal.’
    • ‘An alternative view might instead suggest linking globalization to the creation of a global regulatory framework that would make markets accountable to international political institutions.’
    • ‘The bid to avoid deadlock at the summit also suggested linking the rebate's evolution to agricultural aid after 2013.’
    • ‘Every pupil will be linked up with an undergraduate mentor and they will attend lectures as well as lessons.’
    • ‘And when he returned to England, he linked up with his old school to send out unwanted books.’
    • ‘Vision links strategic policy to tactical actions; leadership relates to training the next generation of military personnel.’
    • ‘The exhibit suggests that body art links an individual to a society, group, or class.’
    associate, connect, relate, join, bracket, draw a connection between, marry, wed
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Connect or join physically:
      ‘a network of routes linking towns and villages’
      ‘the cows are linked up to milking machines’
      • ‘They are medium-distance through-routes connecting important towns and linking the national primary routes.’
      • ‘They were never linked up to Tendring Council's monitoring centre and were not maintained.’
      • ‘In addition to linking villages to market towns and services such as doctors' surgeries and Green Hammerton post office, the mini-bus will be available for hire by community groups and schools.’
      • ‘What about the promise that Sligo would be linked up to the new natural gas line?’
      • ‘North Yorkshire Police had raised concerns over the plans, because of the small size of the building, suggesting the staircase linking the two floors could become a flashpoint for any trouble.’
      • ‘Officers believe the vandals followed a route as the targeted streets all link up with one another.’
      • ‘The property also links to Shop Street, one of Galway's main retail areas.’
      • ‘An extensive network of highways links Mexican cities and towns.’
      • ‘It is one of only a few routes linking the village with Colchester and diversions will have to be set up directing traffic on to a narrower route along Haye Lane.’
      • ‘The suggestion for linking our major rivers is not new.’
      • ‘The bus station is set to be built on what is currently Osborne Street, and link with the proposed Vineyard Gate shopping development.’
      • ‘Instead, new bus routes will link town centres and communities to railway stations.’
      • ‘There are direct and mechanical effects, such as flicking a light switch that directly links two pieces of metal, and a light goes on immediately.’
      • ‘Built on an old railway line, the 35-mile track links Bordeaux with Sauveterre de Guyenne.’
      • ‘The 3-kilometer tunnel links Sochi with five settlements in the mountains, including the popular Krasnaya Polyana ski resort.’
      • ‘Direct trains to Greenwich, Lewisham, Gravesend and Charing Cross, combined with several bus routes linking the town to Dartford and Bluewater, make it easy to get in and out of Crayford.’
      • ‘Do not link more than three light strands, unless the directions indicate it is safe.’
      • ‘To share the video conversation with a wider audience, the phone can be linked up to a TV.’
      • ‘The town is considering extending the trails to eventually link the entire route around the lake.’
      • ‘The property is adjacent to the Great Southern Hotel and also links to Shop Street, one of Galway's main retail areas.’
      join, connect, fasten, attach, bind, unite, combine, amalgamate
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Computing Create a hyperlink between (web pages or hypertext documents):
      ‘I've had problems linking my blog to other websites’
      [no object] ‘it turns out he reads my blogs and was very pleased I'd linked to his article’
      • ‘Right now that URL links to an older post of mine, but I will update it after the conference itself.’
      • ‘Second, this material has to be converted to HTML, and the resulting pages linked to the course homepage.’
      • ‘Linking to and posting interesting messages on other relevant blogs may help build an audience, particularly if those other bloggers link back to you.’
      • ‘The article linked above, for example, gives fascinating insights into the people of Ethiopia.’
      • ‘Check out the first book in the series, conveniently linked below.’
      • ‘Bloggers link to other blogger's posts to argue with them.’
      • ‘His address can be found at the web page linked in the next paragraph.’
      • ‘As a writer for this and other magazines, I find my stuff often gets linked to by assorted bloggers.’
      • ‘The article linked to above makes some good points.’
      • ‘Make sure that all site map pages are linked together.’
      • ‘Placing your portfolio on the Web allows you to link your pages to related information, which helps to situate your work within a broader context of your choosing.’
      • ‘Notes about each song including lyrics can be found on the individual song page linked below.’
      • ‘Browse the articles to which I've linked below for information on particular varieties of flowering landscape trees.’
      • ‘Sorry about the bad link earlier, I can't seem to link the page directly.’
      • ‘Bloggers link to articles and opinion pieces all the time without independently checking the facts in them.’
      • ‘You will have to forgive me (or at least I'm asking you to) for linking news articles with such fervor in recent times.’
      • ‘Why am I the only libertarian blogger linking this?’
      • ‘Specific research interests are listed on the individual faculty pages linked at the left.’
    3. 1.3 Clasp; intertwine:
      ‘once outside he linked arms with her’
      • ‘‘And off we go to Spanish,’ she continued, linking an arm in mine.’
      • ‘And I'll tell you, I'm prepared to link arms with John and others and get this done.’
      • ‘It meant being prepared to link arms with their political opponents in the centre and the right in opposition to terrorism.’
      • ‘Arms will be linked, kisses exchanged and a chorus of Auld Lang Syne belted out.’
      • ‘She links her arm through mine and directs me gently down the path.’
      • ‘More floral tributes were laid on Monday by her friends, who approached the site linking arms.’
      • ‘In Kiev, protesters standing five deep and linking arms blockaded the cabinet building.’
      • ‘It would take over 25 people linking arms to form a circle around some of the largest of these trees.’
      • ‘That is not the best position from which to link arms and march boldly towards the future.’
      • ‘Finally she links her arm into mine again and starts walking.’
      • ‘Encouraging everyone to link arms, he said this was a massive show of solidarity on the part of Waterford and the Government was not going to break it.’
      • ‘I link arms with my agent, my soul mate, my wife.’
      • ‘I picked him up and we linked arms and headed to my house.’
      • ‘‘Yeah,’ she whispered, linking her arm in his as they left the room.’
      • ‘We linked arms and sang the Lambeth Walk and formed a conga line, there was laughter, and singing.’
      • ‘She didn't let any of her new nervousness show and forced a smile as she showed off the dress before linking her arm through his once more and then walking back up the aisle.’
      • ‘I follow Matt outside, where he links his arm with mine.’
      • ‘Hundreds of European fishermen are to link arms in a unique show of solidarity as they fight to save their industry from a predicted collapse.’
      • ‘But they made it a night to remember, with fireworks, a sound system belting out Auld Lang Syne, and revellers linking arms with police and dancing in the street.’
      • ‘Before I even know what he's doing, he links his arms around my waist and he pulls me closer.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a loop; also as a verb in the sense ‘connect physically’): from Old Norse hlekkr, of Germanic origin; related to German Gelenk joint.

Pronunciation:

link

/lɪŋk/

noun

historical
  • A torch of pitch and tow for lighting the way in dark streets.

Origin

Early 16th century: perhaps from medieval Latin li(n)chinus wick, from Greek lukhnos light.

Pronunciation:

link

/lɪŋk/