Definition of line of march in English:

line of march

phrase

  • The route taken in marching.

    • ‘The advance from popular to revolutionary consciousness is not a straight, unbroken line of march.’
    • ‘The mode presenting the greatest risk to life is truck transport because its manned systems are restricted to moving along linear lines of march.’
    • ‘Scout units reporting to lieutenant Clark patrolled the line of march.’
    • ‘On 31 August he was promoted général de brigade and given a division: his general's stars were taken from an old tunic found in a house on the line of march.’
    • ‘He was able to obtain water and camp a short distance off the line of march because he knew the rockholes and soakages of the country.’
    • ‘In the initial period of war, they were infrequently committed to combat right from the line of march to carry out spoiling attacks, but more often than not, they went over to the defensive.’
    • ‘Some guerrillas picked at the edges of his camps and line of march, but did not weaken him appreciably.’
    • ‘Early in the afternoon a herd of about 60 camels arrived, and caused some anxiety to those having horses in or near the line of march.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, the sheer numbers of wild animals encountered almost everywhere in the West during the 1860s and 1870s made it possible for soldiers to kill game almost without leaving the line of march.’
    • ‘Taking a few of his men and volunteers and horses from another camp that had not been sacked, he anticipated the Indians' line of march and did retrieve a few animals.’