Definition of limpet in English:

limpet

noun

  • 1A marine mollusc which has a shallow conical shell and a broad muscular foot, found clinging tightly to rocks.

    • ‘Mussels and limpets are their primary food, but Black Oystercatchers prey on a wide range of shellfish and other creatures found along the rocky shore.’
    • ‘Entering the water from the shore, the first animal we spot may well be a mollusc such as a limpet or dog-whelk.’
    • ‘Slipper limpets have also made their way across the Atlantic, taking over areas off the coast of the British Isles and Northern Europe.’
    • ‘Lottiid and especially fissurelid limpets, neither of which feed predominately on macroalgae, also have given rise to large-bodied taxa in certain temperate oceans.’
    • ‘In particular, they noted that modem patelloid limpets have segmented scars due to bundling of the large retractor muscle.’
    • ‘Secondary gills are found in Ancylids, which are freshwater limpets adapted to life in fast-flowing streams.’
    • ‘The shape of a limpet's shell has a great deal to do with whether the animal remains securely attached to its rock or is ripped off and thrown onto dry land or into the waiting tentacles of a hungry sea anemone.’
    • ‘While Pisaster has a very broad diet that includes barnacles, limpets, snails, and chitons, mussels are its preferred prey.’
    • ‘Brains of limpets and abalones are much simpler than brains of garden snails and slugs in histological differentiation.’
    • ‘There is a gap of several tens of millions of years between the Middle Permian when the last Metoptomatids lived, and the Middle Triassic when the true limpets appear.’
    • ‘In coastal areas, they eat mussels, barnacles, and limpets.’
    • ‘Two thirds along things change, there are some scattered rocks covered in barnacles, limpets, mussels and seaweed.’
    • ‘Two species of limpets, previously unrecorded for the West Point area, have also been found during this study.’
    • ‘The ‘lock-and-key’ fit of homing limpets may have more to do with resistance to dislodgment than with desiccation.’
    • ‘Barnacles are crustaceans like crabs and shrimps but, because of their appearance, until the 19th century they were thought to be molluscs like limpets and whelks.’
    • ‘Modern species thrive under intense herbivory from snails, chitons, and limpets, and this has been suggested as one reason for their success.’
    • ‘The sand was dotted with saucer - sized jellyfish, rocks and pools are squidgy with jelly buttons encrusted with limpets, barnacles and winkles and are seedbeds for mussels.’
    • ‘Many of the taxa that apparently diverged in the Paleozoic now are limpets and retain little information about the morphologies of their coiled ancestors.’
    • ‘Some species of limpets have been shown to spend their entire lives within a few cm of their home scars, while others can move upwards of 1 m during a single tidal cycle.’
    • ‘It seems that as limpets creep across rocks, eating algae, they also eat chalk.’
    1. 1.1 Used in comparisons to refer to people and things that cling tightly:
      ‘the couples on the floor were clinging to each other like limpets’

Origin

Old English lempedu, from medieval Latin lampreda limpet, lamprey.

Pronunciation:

limpet

/ˈlɪmpɪt/