Main definitions of limp in English

: limp1limp2

limp1

verb

  • 1no object, usually with adverbial of direction Walk with difficulty, typically because of a damaged or stiff leg or foot.

    ‘he limped heavily as he moved’
    with adverbial of direction ‘he limped off during Saturday's game’
    • ‘We both started cracking up when we looked to the back and saw that Guy was still limping on one foot to the boys locker room.’
    • ‘I watched as the driver of the car came to his feet, he was limping on his left leg.’
    • ‘Thompson, who has a badly bruised foot and limped from the dismal fray early in the second-half on Tuesday, could be out for two weeks.’
    • ‘Now he's got a large bruise on his foot and is limping pretty badly on it.’
    • ‘The pain can be so severe the patient limps or hobbles around with the affected heel off the ground.’
    • ‘Biting his tongue, he pulled himself to his feet and limped across the room to his bed.’
    • ‘Jason finally gets onto one foot and begins to limp with the other one.’
    • ‘Ideally, these steaks should arrive as hard and dense as diamonds; drop them on your foot and you'll limp for a week.’
    • ‘He limped heavily as his co-pilot helped him to walk; it appeared as thought he man's leg was broken.’
    • ‘They watched as the goat struggled to its feet and limped away, bleating in protest at this unexpected treatment.’
    • ‘Angela quickly recovered from her stumble, and began to limp while walking ahead of him, hoping he wouldn't notice.’
    • ‘Meghan climbed to her feet, still limping on her injured leg, and looked around at the crowd of girls.’
    • ‘She bent down to clutch her leg, limping more heavily upon it as she moved towards the bed, then sat heavily upon it.’
    • ‘The end of the shell pierced the bottom of my foot as I limped to the steps.’
    • ‘The caravan of cars was accompanied by men and women on bicycles and limping along by foot.’
    • ‘If your child shows signs of joint swelling, stiffness or pain or just limps for no obvious reason, take your child to your family doctor.’
    • ‘He lightly brushed Arin away and walked over to Karras, limping heavily on his right leg.’
    • ‘He staggered to his feet, limping towards the entrance of the cave, his body searing with pain each time he moved.’
    • ‘James was bleeding from a large gash on his forehead, while Ryan was limping heavily and his shirt was torn.’
    • ‘It took Ryre five days before he could manage to walk without limping.’
    hobble, walk with a limp, walk with difficulty, walk lamely, walk haltingly, walk unevenly, falter
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with adverbial of direction (of a damaged ship, aircraft, or vehicle) proceed with difficulty.
      ‘the badly damaged aircraft limped back to Sicily’
      • ‘Soldiers silhouetted by a pink sunset watched their battle-worn vehicles limp back into camp.’
      • ‘Because it handles like a Formula 1 car limping into the pits with four burst tyres.’
      • ‘I soon found out how difficult it would be to limp the aircraft home.’
      • ‘A damaged Cardassian ship limps into the station carrying a Cardassian reformist and her two pupils.’
      • ‘All the punishment dished out meant only eight cars could limp out for the demolition derby in which Bill Bylett ground the opposition to a halt.’
      • ‘Sadly it has been damaged and is presently limping into Cascais, Portugal.’
      • ‘It was able to limp about a half mile away and crash land.’
      • ‘Its bow was severely damaged, and 23 sailors were hurt too badly to stand watch as the vessel limped back to Guam.’
      • ‘Three days later the boat limps into Newport, a few mattresses stuffed into the broken-off tip of the hull to keep the water out.’
      • ‘After 37 days at sea his ship limped into Sydney after being torpedoed by a German U-boat.’
      • ‘It strikes me as curious that a relatively new car limps into the garage, rasping and wheezing like a parched man crawling on all fours towards a mirage of an oasis, but then pulls off purring contentedly like the cat that got the cream.’
      • ‘The gunners managed to shoot down two of the attackers before the aircraft was badly hit, limping back to base on two of its four engines.’

noun

  • A tendency to limp; a gait impeded by injury or stiffness.

    ‘the accident left him with a pronounced limp’
    • ‘Eonsas was a big man, in at least his fiftieth turn, still strong but developing a pronounced limp on his left side.’
    • ‘The limp can be related to an injury or sometimes may occur for no apparent reason.’
    • ‘He spent nearly a year in hospital in 1945 as a result of a leg wound and walked with a pronounced limp for the rest of his life.’
    • ‘He got up from his sitting position and, with a slight limp in his gait, he ran towards the battlefield.’
    • ‘The swelling has gone down but the lamb still has a limp.’
    • ‘The person in the centre with the trilby is undoubtedly my grandfather Jack Caton, because of his pronounced limp.’
    • ‘He was gravely wounded in World War I, leaving him with a pronounced limp for the rest of his life.’
    • ‘It didn't seem like a very big deal at the time, and in fact I had all but forgotten about it until I woke up this morning with a pronounced limp.’
    • ‘He walked to the sink with a slight limp from a battle injury he'd gotten years before either of his children had come to him, from nature or from science.’
    • ‘William Gallas had to remain in the fray despite an injury that gave him an ever more pronounced limp.’
    • ‘Earlier injuries would be crucial in identifying Uday, who was hit by 17 bullets in an assassination attempt in 1996 that left him with a limp.’
    • ‘His injuries are still with him; he cannot raise his arms above his shoulders; he still has a slight limp.’
    • ‘Janet's memories of her father are all of a man with a limp.’
    • ‘The crowd that December night at the Boulder Theater included a man in a wheelchair with two broken ankles, a pair on crutches, and a handful of others with pronounced limps.’
    • ‘Later, at the Croatia team base further down the mountain, she shuffles up the stairs ahead of me with a pronounced limp.’
    • ‘He watched her, wordlessly, using a carefully organized gait to hide the limp.’
    • ‘They have a pitcher whose right leg is an inch shorter than his left leg, giving him a limp in his gait.’
    • ‘He was also wearing a pair of thin, silver-rimmed glasses and walks with a pronounced limp in his left leg.’
    • ‘A limp may develop, with associated stiffness.’
    • ‘Testimony to the battering that his body took from falls are metal pins inserted in both arms, plates and screws holding his legs together, and a pronounced limp.’
    lameness, hobble, uneven gait, shuffle
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘fall short of’): related to obsolete limphalt ‘lame’, and probably of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

limp

/lɪmp/

Main definitions of limp in English

: limp1limp2

limp2

adjective

  • 1Lacking internal strength or structure; not stiff or firm.

    ‘she let her whole body go limp’
    ‘the flags hung limp and still’
    • ‘Aaron's body went limp for a second, blood covering his mouth, then broke into spasms.’
    • ‘Her head was limp and floppy and she hung like a rag doll.’
    • ‘He wanted her limp body curled around a soft teddy bear now.’
    • ‘Avoid bunches that have thin, limp leaves that are pale-green or yellow or bunches with extremely large or blemished stalks.’
    • ‘Pramoto, a man with a soft face and a limp cigarette, lay sprawled on a rickshaw seat.’
    • ‘In a fashion shoot called Doll Drums, the model lies limp and stiff, draped over chairs as if she'd been thrown there by a petulant child.’
    • ‘Raven watched as a limp arm was slid through the biggest of the board cracks to hang there like a piece of meat before him.’
    • ‘I was pretty damn sure I had turned completely white; I felt stiff, limp, and heavy all at once.’
    • ‘Under his increasingly limp fingers, the antennae stiffened, then pulled back, away from his head.’
    • ‘He threw Annabelle's limp body over his shoulder with sheer brute strength, and then proceeded into the dark room.’
    • ‘A woman in her mid-fifties stood on a ladder organizing books on a top shelf, her stiff, dark hair long since made limp by the humidity.’
    • ‘Then he went limp, his hand slacked and his head sunk back.’
    • ‘The cover of the tank opened, and Kompuu's limp body fell out.’
    • ‘Suddenly, he had the urge to kiss her until she went soft and limp in his arms.’
    • ‘Sarah screamed hysterically as she pulled on her mother's limp arm, covered with deep cuts and bloodstains.’
    • ‘Dori's body stiffened, and then she went limp, slumping to the floor.’
    • ‘Forbes lifted the limp figure into his arms and placed him under the covers of the thick blankets.’
    • ‘Survivors, alone or in pairs, carried away limp victims covered with blood and sand.’
    • ‘As soon as he was safe from the sea's cold clutches, Arrigo covered his sister's limp form with his jacket, then collapsed beside her.’
    • ‘It was much larger than it had first appeared, and had dark red and blue feathers covering its limp body.’
    soft, flaccid, loose, slack, lacking firmness, lax, unfirm, pliable, not taut, relaxed
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Having or denoting a book cover that is not stiffened with board.
    2. 1.2 Without energy or vigour.
      ‘a limp handshake’
      • ‘A limp handshake and a thank-you for rounding out the end of an otherwise mundane Sunday.’
      • ‘Limp Handshakes annoy me intensely, I don't care who it's from.’
      • ‘She offered a limp handshake, maintaining eye contact with the wall space just above my head.’
      • ‘The most common blunders include being late for the interview, dirty finger nails, slouching in the seat and having a wet, limp handshake.’
      • ‘Her opposite hand shaking, she put it around the limp wrist.’
      • ‘The handshake was moist and limp, the type that made any soldier or field officer cringe.’
      • ‘Too tired to argue, I hung like a limp rag doll to his arm as he half carried me effortlessly through a maze of corridors.’
      • ‘Besides, there was food right here, all he had to do was hypnotize her, or hit her with enough psychic energy to make her limp and unconscious.’
      • ‘Foster stared at her hand as if it was a snake, before she reluctantly took it in a limp handshake.’
      • ‘She said in a slurred voice while she went limp in his arms, she energy spent.’
      • ‘Still feeling sick, he was completely limp without any energy.’
      • ‘His hand-shake was as limp as ever but even more damp.’
      • ‘Zeke watched horrified, as Zhore went limp and his energy faded into nothingness.’
      • ‘She had no energy left to direct Hawk and sat there limp and lifeless as a rag doll.’
      • ‘The girl's brown eyes looked coolly at her, taking Manda's hand in a limp handshake.’
      • ‘This production could have used more aggressive direction from Barbara Larose to spark the limp energy of the cast.’
      • ‘Like a limp handshake, this beer lacked substance and character; however our pack on the next table seemed to be drinking it easily enough!’
      • ‘If your entire body is achy, tired, and limp, you need to replenish your energies.’
      soft, flaccid, loose, slack, lacking firmness, lax, unfirm, pliable, not taut, relaxed
      tired, fatigued, weary, exhausted, worn out
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century: of unknown origin; perhaps related to limp, having the basic sense ‘hanging loose’.

Pronunciation

limp

/lɪmp/