Main definitions of lime in English

: lime1lime2lime3lime4

lime1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A white caustic alkaline substance consisting of calcium oxide, which is obtained by heating limestone and which combines with water with the production of much heat; quicklime.

    • ‘By pressing a button on the bottom, water mixes with quicklime, producing a chemical reaction that heats the coffee.’
    • ‘People made their own containing milk protein, quicklime and earth pigments, and giving a variety of colours from browns to greens.’
    • ‘The mineral, carbonate of lime, assumes an immense diversity of characters, though no one doubts that under all these Protean changes it is one and the same thing.’
    • ‘Hydrated slaked lime is slaked quicklime that has reacted with water to form calcium hydroxide.’
    • ‘The pH can be adjusted by adding hydrated lime or caustic soda.’
    • ‘If the hair on the skin were to be removed, urine, quicklime or wood ash was use in solution into which the hide was steeped and then rubbed or left to soak into the wet surface.’
    • ‘In the laboratory higher concentration ethanol, with less water, can be produced by refluxing the rectified spirit with quicklime and then distilling the alcohol mixture.’
    • ‘In early times, people roasted limestone to obtain lime (calcium oxide), a base.’
    • ‘We have two manufacturing plants which produce high calcium quicklime and hydrated lime products.’
    • ‘They used various materials such as lime, copper, silica, iron oxides, and chalk to produce numerous colors.’
    • ‘Kathleen Jamie should have used quicklime rather than caustic soda to deflesh her gannet's skull, but maggots would have been best.’
    • ‘This occurs when finely divided amorphous silica particles combine with available lime to form a calcium silicate hydrate.’
    • ‘Calcium oxide, more commonly known as lime or quicklime, has been studied by scholars as far back as the pre-Christian era.’
    • ‘All of the water is chemically combined with the quicklime, so the product remains a ‘dry’, free-flowing powder.’
    • ‘Magnesia, quicklime, and nitric acid all seemed promising for a time, but failed.’
    • ‘Studies of old vineyard soils in Bordeaux have shown that fertility can be restored by heavy applications of organic matter, lime, phosphorus, and potassium.’
    • ‘Some contractors rework soft spots in the subgrade material, mixing quicklime (hydrated lime) or fly ash into the material to help dry it out or bind it together.’
    • ‘A mixture of bean paste and lime is applied to stencil patterns on the cotton before it is dyed with indigo.’
    • ‘If the burning chemical is a powder-like substance such as lime, brush it off the skin before flushing.’
    • ‘He published his first paper in 1816 on caustic lime from Tuscany.’
    1. 1.1 A white alkaline substance consisting of calcium hydroxide, made by adding water to quicklime and used in traditional building methods to make plaster, mortar, and limewash.
      • ‘Check whether your building or part of it is constructed with any of the traditional building materials like lime, laterite, granite, wood, mud or the like.’
      • ‘It is almost impossible for molds and bacteria that harm people to grow on lime plaster or on concrete.’
      • ‘When quicklime is soaked in water, it is changed to calcium hydroxide or slaked lime.’
      • ‘It's about 800 years old, and still contains traces of lime mortar, indicating it was probably used in the tanning process.’
      • ‘Stucco is a siding material made of Portland cement, sand, lime and water.’
      • ‘Thin slices of the nut, either natural or processed, may be mixed with a variety of substances including slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) and spices such as cardamom, coconut, and saffron.’
      • ‘Colors are fresh and pure and the calcium hydroxide slaked lime into which the fresco is painted lends a reflective brightness unmatched by other painting mediums.’
      • ‘To cure the problem conservationists have tapped the wisdom of the abbey's ancient builders and are planning to replace the cement with a medieval hydrolic lime mortar mix.’
      • ‘The first part, using slaked lime, should take about 20-30 minutes, while the second part should not add more than 15 minutes of practical work.’
      • ‘Hydrated slaked lime is slaked quicklime that has reacted with water to form calcium hydroxide.’
      • ‘Studies at the Getty Conservation Institute on high-reactivity quicklime have identified the parameters for developing high-quality slaked lime putty to be used in the comparative evaluations.’
      • ‘It will have to be pretty much to plan, using bricks and lime mortar and proper wooden sashes for the windows.’
      • ‘Rectangular in shape, the Fort, made of lime and mortar, extends to an area of 16,200 square metres.’
      • ‘Weigh shovelsful of lime and cement separately so you can calculate approximate water needs for your mix.’
      • ‘The bales are stacked on stone footings and lime plaster will coat the outside walls.’
      • ‘At the French army's tricolour-splashed Foyer du Soldat, we see the resurrection of cooling lime plaster cremated under cement.’
      • ‘Well-versed in building and building materials, he used a traditional mortar of lime and sand to decorate his small cottage with shells.’
      • ‘A technique that dates back 5,000 years or more, buon fresco - or true fresco - involves the application of five layers of plaster made from a mixture of slaked lime and sand.’
      • ‘All repairs to ancient monuments have to be done under official supervision, and then old techniques like lime mortar have to be used.’
      • ‘Hydrated lime is actually slaked lime that has been dried and repulverized by the manufacturing company and is ready for use.’
    2. 1.2 (in general use) any of a number of calcium compounds, especially calcium hydroxide, used as an additive to soil or water.
      • ‘Ideally, the laboratory testing procedure adopted should emulate site conditions as closely as possible to quantify reactivity of the soil with lime.’
      • ‘In its pure form it is a light, whitish metal; but it is seldom thus seen because it reacts violently with water to form lime (calcium hydroxide).’
      • ‘This can be accomplished by frequently adding small amounts of lime to the soil surface.’
      • ‘Or you may set your plant in sharp sand, and mix some lime with the soil which you replace.’
      • ‘In extremely acidic soils some lime may be needed as well.’
      • ‘One thing that they did toward this end was to mix lime into the soil.’
      • ‘In general, lime is offered in two different forms - dry and liquid.’
      • ‘Often, it is determined that the soil needs more lime.’
      • ‘Additionally, lime enables soils that are not productive to become effective.’
      • ‘So, it's best to use lime sparingly on soils, especially those with a high Ph (alkaline).’
      • ‘The level of soluble calcium in lime slurry is significantly increased with the addition of silica fume.’
      • ‘The durability of the soil - lime specimens was also similarly affected.’
      • ‘Mix a shovel full of compost, a handful of bone meal, and a little Dolomite lime to the soil which was removed.’
      • ‘Once you have the results of the soil test, you can add nutrients or soil amendments such as lime, as needed.’
      • ‘Some vineyards affected by copper toxicity in the Bordeaux area are much reduced in vigour, but the problem can be overcome by adding lime to the soil.’
      • ‘Less lime is generally required on bottomland, more on hillsides and the most on hilltops.’
      • ‘In general, lime does not move downward further than plow depth in an organic soil.’
      • ‘General purpose cement and lime are commonly used in subgrade stabilisation by Australian councils.’
      • ‘Add lime if the soil's pH is too low; autumn is the best time to apply.’
      • ‘Use lime, if needed, to adjust soil pH and raise calcium levels.’
  • 2archaic Birdlime.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Treat (soil or water) with lime to reduce acidity and improve fertility or oxygen levels:

    ‘they were liming acidified lakes’
    • ‘The rest will become available over time, and many nutrients will also become more available when a soil is limed.’
    • ‘Soils previously limed heavily for a garden or other crops in the past may need the pH lowered.’
    • ‘Records show that in Mazabuka, Chibombo and Mumbwa, a large number of farmers confirm that lime usage had improved their yields tremendously.’
    • ‘The ponds are refilled with seawater and fresh water to produce a salinity of 2-10 ppt and limed to a neutral pH.’
    • ‘Soil is limed in some areas to improve barley growth and productivity on acid soils, but this practice is often economically unfeasible.’
    • ‘Government bodies since the 1950s have pushed landowners and offered subsidies to plough up or lime the heather to allow the spread of grass.’
    • ‘Fertilizing and liming the area will improve cover conditions as will the construction of a brush pile for additional cover.’
    • ‘It is at a time like this when farmers should plan to get their fields limed because failure to plan for such important issues that affect their business is definitely preparing to fail-PALISAH’
    • ‘Avoid spreading urea on land limed less than nine months ago.’
    • ‘As with calcium, availability of magnesium is also determined largely by soil pH. When soils are adequately limed with high-magnesium limestone, magnesium deficiencies are not likely to occur.’
    • ‘The soil was limed by applying 5 • 5 g CaCO 3 kg - 1 soil.’
    • ‘He offers advice on crocus bulbs, liming the roses, putting coffee grounds on the chives.’
    • ‘Groundsmen lime the rugger fields for the student young of the great and the good.’
    • ‘If the bulbs are planted deeply it is possible to leave them undisturbed for two or three years although acid or neutral soil will have to be limed.’
    1. 1.1often as adjective limed Give (wood) a bleached appearance by treating it with lime:
      ‘limed oak dining furniture’
      • ‘Beds are set on platforms or suspended from ceilings, bathtubs are hewn from blocks of black granite or pale limestone, and the bare wood floorboards are wide, limed and lacquered.’
      • ‘The kitchen, to the rear, has limed oak units at ground and eye level, a tiled worktop and splashback.’
      • ‘There is a good-sized drawing room features a French-style limed oak fireplace and polished wood floor.’
      • ‘A room currently used as a study, but which could also make a third bedroom, also has a cast-iron fireplace as well as built-in presses and limed tongue-and-groove floorboards.’
      • ‘Both interconnected reception rooms are decorated in contemporary grey tones and are laid in limed wooden antique floorboards.’
      • ‘The kitchen is fitted with limed oak units, granite-effect worktops and a tiled splashback, as well as a ceramic-tiled floor with underfloor heating.’
      • ‘On one side, a stone wall has been fully exposed and the white wooden flooring has a limed wash finish.’
      • ‘To the right is a large, galley-style kitchen area with limed oak units, a double oven and hob and a breakfast bar.’
      • ‘The kitchen is fitted with handmade limed oak presses, while there is also a breakfast room with access to the back garden. Upstairs are four bedrooms, a bathroom and a separate shower room.’
  • 2archaic Catch (a bird) with birdlime:

    ‘the bird that hath been limed in a bush’

Origin

Old English līm, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch lijm, German Leim, also to loam.

Pronunciation:

lime

/lʌɪm/

Main definitions of lime in English

: lime1lime2lime3lime4

lime2

noun

  • 1A rounded citrus fruit similar to a lemon but greener, smaller, and with a distinctive acid flavour:

    ‘roughly chop two limes’
    [mass noun] ‘wedges of lime’
    [as modifier] ‘lime juice’
    • ‘The citric acid in lemons or limes has a similar effect, although this is not called ‘cooking’.’
    • ‘You'll also need limes, lemons, olives and lots of ice.’
    • ‘The limes add dimensions of flavour beyond tart or citrusy.’
    • ‘Consider adding whole lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruits and even kumquats to main courses as they cook.’
    • ‘Orchards carpet the land in parts of California, and oranges, lemons, limes, and other citrus are familiar trees in home gardens.’
    • ‘When you have too many lemons or limes or oranges and some are going to spoil, slice some thinly and then freeze the slices.’
    • ‘Citric acid is an organic (carbon based) acid found in nearly all citrus fruits, particularly lemons, limes, and grapefruits.’
    • ‘Finely grate the zest of the limes into a bowl, add the juice of the limes, stir in the condensed milk and then the cream.’
    • ‘It worked out great: the lime and salt and pepper gave the beef the kick it needed to fully inflate its potential.’
    • ‘If substituting lemons for limes, you need to double the amount to reach the required strength of flavour.’
    • ‘It is capable of juicing lemons, oranges, limes and grapefruit.’
    • ‘I have a wooden citrus reamer that I use for small doses of things like limes or lemons and I have a glass juicer handed down to me by my grandmother that I use for larger quantities.’
    • ‘Oranges, lemons, limes, mandarins or other citrus fruit from Queensland will be banned from entering any other state or territory, threatening at least $100 million worth of fruit still to be picked in the state.’
    • ‘Oranges, lemons and limes are particularly high in Vitamin C. Carrots provide vitamin D and spinach is rich in iron.’
    • ‘‘Soda adds the refreshment and the lime adds the citrus twist to counterbalance the honey sweetness,’ Parnell said.’
    • ‘It came on a correctly pre-warmed plate with a baked potato, a selection of steamed vegetables, half a lime and a pepper grinder - no need to ask!’
    • ‘Surprisingly complex for one so young, delivering flavours of spice, limes, lemons, orange peel and oatmeal, all harmoniously threaded with ripe acidity.’
    • ‘Then we actually make a couple of our own rums, a citrus one in which we soak lemons, limes and oranges.’
    • ‘Lemons, limes, and oranges can be frozen whole.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, cut lemons or limes into wedges, and simmer the olives in a little water to reduce saltiness.’
    1. 1.1[mass noun] A drink made from or flavoured with lime juice:
      ‘lager and lime’
      • ‘For this you will need rum, sugar, fresh mint, lime, soda water and a muddler.’
      • ‘I've heard her laughing loudly in bars, seen her drinking vodka, lime and soda on cramped dance floors, seen her queuing outside West End clubs.’
      • ‘Robbo equalised in the second half, so now I'm waiting for full time, and drinking vodka and lime, which is all rather civilised.’
      • ‘But he smiled at me whilst he was at the till, and when he came to serve me said ‘Vodka lemonade and lime yeah,?’’
      • ‘I now have seltzer water with a splash of unsweetened cranberry juice and lime instead of wine most of the time.’
      • ‘Her favourite drink right now is vodka, lime and soda.’
      • ‘I changed my drinks, brandy, lime and soda now and different pretty little cigs in pretty packets.’
      • ‘Blackcurrent cordial for lime, lemonade for soda.’
      • ‘Top up with ginger beer, squeeze two chunks of fresh lime.’
      • ‘The often loutish, boozy image was replaced with players such as Jonny Wilkinson and Jason Robinson, who looked as though a dash of lime in their soda water was enough excitement for one night.’
  • 2The evergreen citrus tree which produces limes, widely cultivated in warm climates.

    • ‘In the same way, every small home in the Caribbean has always kept some vegetables and a fruit tree (usually a lime, but also other citrus).’
    • ‘In the western zone, oranges, limes, and bananas are cultivated.’
    • ‘It belongs to the citrus family, Rutaceae, but is not a true lime.’
  • 3[mass noun] A bright light green colour like that of a lime:

    [as modifier] ‘a lime-green bikini’
    • ‘She shut her bedroom door with a click and lit her lime green lava lamp, glancing over at her clock to check the time.’
    • ‘He intends to not be here to see what lime-green, red and purple look like against the background of blue walls already illuminated by dubious tubelights.’
    • ‘To do this, the couple painted the gallery using a vibrant lime-green, teal and purple palette.’
    • ‘Asters look fabulous combined with gold variegated trailing ivies and heathers with lime-green or flame coloured foliage.’
    • ‘With cheerful colours from lime green to pineapple yellow, they promise to make the steaming hot days a little more bearable.’
    • ‘Big colours include pink, lime green, bright blues and more sombre chocolate browns and off whites.’
    • ‘Paired with the bright lime green tank top she was wearing, and the hot pink miniskirt, she looked quite odd.’
    • ‘The lime-green walls are almost completely covered with dozens of perfectly spaced framed posters advertising horror and science-fiction movies of the Thirties, Forties and Fifties.’
    • ‘It's a strange thing when a letter from the school principal arrives on lime green and aqua stationery.’
    • ‘Novelty colours available are lime green and a dark red seemingly black.’
    • ‘It was a comfortable room with walnut end tables, coffee table and paneling, moss green carpet, drapes and dark green throws on the lime-green couch and chair.’
    • ‘Believing the sky to be lime green with bright orange spots isn't faith, it's psychosis.’
    • ‘The only information I had about him was that he was about 6ft tall and would be wearing something lime-green coloured.’
    • ‘The main bedroom - in cream and lime-green, with a beige ottoman at the foot of the queen-size bed - is the epitome of cosiness.’
    • ‘Now I have on a bright neon lime green T-shirt and I'm not a small girl, so you can't miss me.’
    • ‘When off duty he will have one other suit, either lime green, electric blue or maroon and he will often wear the jacket with a pair of black trousers.’
    • ‘Today she has Purple and lime green socks and a matching scarf.’
    • ‘Artfully arranged under this symphony of green and white is a pair of equally beautiful, lime-green, soft-leathered, hand-stitched, high-heeled Manolos.’
    • ‘His attire will be haphazardly thrown together, but he'll still look good, except perhaps when he's wearing the lime-green slacks with the purple blazer.’
    • ‘We contemplated lots of different colors before settling on some sort of lime green or apple green.’
    greenish, viridescent
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French, from modern Provençal limo, Spanish lima, from Arabic līma; compare with lemon.

Pronunciation:

lime

/lʌɪm/

Main definitions of lime in English

: lime1lime2lime3lime4

lime3

(also lime tree)

noun

  • A deciduous tree with heart-shaped leaves and fragrant yellowish blossom, native to north temperate regions. The pale timber is used for carving and inexpensive furniture.

    Also called linden
    • ‘Using trees such as lime, ash, sycamore and chestnut results in a imposing display which is far superior to what smaller garden trees produce.’
    • ‘Elms and limes are, as trees go, very different to the eye - at least when in full leaf.’
    • ‘I asked him if the lime tree season was over and if that was why our limes were turning yellowish-orange.’
    • ‘It was also about this time that lines of magnificent beech trees were planted along the front avenue, roadside and Nun's Walk and specimen limes, beeches and chestnuts planted in the park.’
    • ‘Next we took the valley bottom road and there met only two walkers and a laden tractor and then, after a conker tree and a lime tree, reached the farmstead of Lower Askew.’
    • ‘The car park fronting the baroque facade of Wentworth is due to be replaced by authentic sweeping parkland and a lime and oak-lined avenue.’
    • ‘As you walk along the rides at this time of the year you can see the wonderful glow of red and scarlet oaks, the luminous yellows of lime and tulip trees, and the russet, orange and gold of maples and Persian ironwood.’
    • ‘At the hamlet's Milbank House, a lime, a conker and a turkey oak shade a stone culvert and set their seed and nuts.’
    • ‘Many trees, such as lime, sycamore, horse chestnut and willow provide excellent bee forage.’
    • ‘Most of our timber trees are introductions too: oak, ash and elm are native, but sycamore, lime, maple, spruce, Douglas fir are all aliens.’
    • ‘We don't mean by ‘tree’ quite what our animist forebears meant by the word they used to talk about oaks, limes, and beeches.’
    • ‘The gardens which surround the property include beech, lime and holm oak trees while in the eastern corner is an ancient churchyard.’
    • ‘Marcia pointed out that at the same time as the High Street trees were planted a lime tree was put in the churchyard at the top of the street.’
    • ‘The Lough Tree - often called The Love Tree - is a lime tree thought to be more than 200 years old.’
    • ‘Residents fear cutting the 30 ft limes, which formed part of an avenue of trees leading to All Saints Church, to hedge height, could open the way for renewed attempts to develop land on the rectory site.’
    • ‘On the island, I followed indistinct paths through the lime, oak and black alder trees.’
    • ‘Since 2000, 32 different species of tree have been planted including oak, ash, small-leaved limes and bird cherry, while a carpet of bluebells and daffodils has also been sown.’
    • ‘Some willow trees will be lost by the development but trees like hornbeam, lime and birch will remain with preservation orders on them.’
    • ‘Growing conifers is still important, but oaks, ash, and limes are now seen as a way of restoring ancient woodlands and promoting more diverse flora and fauna.’
    • ‘As we descended in the jungle, Jim Johnson pointed out domestic and medicinal plants - cinnamon, cashew, limes and soursop.’

Origin

Early 17th century: alteration of obsolete line, from Old English lind (see linden).

Pronunciation:

lime

/lʌɪm/

Main definitions of lime in English

: lime1lime2lime3lime4

lime4

verb

[NO OBJECT]West Indian
  • Sit or stand around talking with others:

    ‘boys and girls were liming along the roadside as if they didn't have anything to do’
    • ‘Two of the men were liming on the street near a car, awaiting the other two, when the man allegedly approached them.’
    • ‘And at 1 am yesterday, a Dibe, Long Circular resident, who was recently released from prison was gunned down as he was liming outside his home.’
    • ‘Those involved in the investigation said Sean, was liming with two friends near his home around 7 am.’
    • ‘Police reports stated that at around 6.45 pm, Phillip, 21, was liming near the basketball court at upper Gokool Street, Diego Martin, when a man approached him and fired several shots.’
    • ‘Student Priya Rambarran said she was liming on the playfield with her friends when she saw the wall falling.’

noun

West Indian
  • An informal social gathering characterized by semi-ritualized talking.

    • ‘You think my reaction had anything to do with the little lime up by our friend's apartment?’
    • ‘On Tuesday night last week, Natty and I enjoyed ourselves immensely at a little lime in our complex.’
    • ‘I was expecting to have so much to say, but it was just a cool lime, lots of people.’
    • ‘Take the case of a small lime hosted on Friday 13 by jazz pianist Raf Robertson.’
    • ‘But Trinis are such that they will continue to go to Carnival shows and fêtes and dinners and limes with their friends, and so on.’

Origin

Origin uncertain; said to be from Limey (because of the number of British sailors present during the Second World War), or from suck a lime, expressing bitterness at not being invited to a gathering.

Pronunciation:

lime

/lʌɪm/