Definition of lift in English:

lift

verb

  • 1with object Raise to a higher position or level.

    ‘he lifted his trophy over his head’
    • ‘He also knows that whoever lifts the Border-Gavaskar Trophy in Bombay next month will know that they've been through a scrap to end all scraps.’
    • ‘"Let me see, " I said, lifting up his baggy shirt.’
    • ‘Stepping in front of him, her hand gently lifted his chiseled chin, forcing him to stare at her.’
    • ‘When the cure was complete, the probe was raised to lift the entire cell wall above the water level.’
    • ‘I ran my hand over the finely polished mahogany surface, and gently lifted the lid.’
    • ‘I took a deep breath and lifted myself into sitting position, taking the two with me.’
    • ‘His black cape trailed behind him and was lifted by the gentle breeze that passed by.’
    • ‘With a sigh and a heave, she lifted herself up and meandered over to the filing cabinet.’
    • ‘It is a startling admission from the manager who ended the club's 36-year wait for a trophy by lifting the Tennents Scottish Cup two years ago.’
    • ‘Entranced by its beauty she gently lifted the lid.’
    • ‘The thing lifted Ivan to eye level, looked at him for a few seconds, then dropped him.’
    • ‘The only time that a Burnley captain has lifted the famous old trophy was in 1914 and within months a World War had started.’
    • ‘Raise your upper body as if your chin is being lifted straight up toward the ceiling.’
    • ‘He stepped forward and embraced his son, lifting him clear off the ground.’
    • ‘She lifted up his shirt and saw three thick red lines along his torso.’
    • ‘Strong arms, built up from years of raising a child, lifted her up.’
    • ‘Bob dropped to the floor in a cross-legged position, then lifted himself onto the tips of his toes.’
    • ‘A warm hand lifted her chin upward as he leaned towards her and stared into her brown copper eyes.’
    • ‘When its receiver has been lifted, it means the nameless voice on the other end of the line meets two criteria: speaks English and needs help.’
    • ‘I leaned over and grabbed her shoulders, lifting her up into a sitting position.’
    raise, hoist, heave, haul up, uplift, heft, boost, raise aloft, raise up, upraise, elevate, thrust, hold high, bear aloft
    improve, boost, enhance, make better, invigorate, revitalize, upgrade, ameliorate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Move (one's eyes or face) to face upwards and look at someone or something.
      ‘he lifted his eyes for an instant’
      • ‘Something stirs within me and I slowly lift my eyes to meet your glare.’
      • ‘I sat close to the fire, gazing into the glowing heart of it, and then lifting my eyes to the brightening stars.’
      • ‘This means nothing to me, because I'd not lift my eyes to find out what it was called.’
      • ‘She closed her eyes and lifted her face up to the skies, feeling the gentle breeze caress her face as she slowly let go of everything on her mind.’
      • ‘Instead, let's lift our eyes and see how wide the American horizon has become.’
      • ‘He stopped and closed his eyes, lifting his face to the sky.’
      • ‘And for the first time that day, Valerie lifted her eyes upwards and almost gasped at where she had wandered to.’
      • ‘She stays like that, lifting her face and her camera to the heavens, in the squawking aerial universe of all these flying creatures.’
      • ‘We must lift our eyes from the misleading and myopic platitudes of our politicians and look to the future.’
      • ‘He paused as the woman moved away, then lifted his eyes to the ceiling again.’
      • ‘He rocks, shuffles and chews a plastic bottle, then sits in that distressingly human way bears have with his back to the wall and lifts his face to a glimmer of watery sunshine.’
      • ‘She closed her eyes and lifted her face to the sun poking momentarily from behind the clouds.’
      • ‘He called upon the gathered journalists from Canada, Britain, the US and the region to lift their eyes from the mud and look up at the stars.’
      • ‘I stole fifteen minutes to go and sit on the patio, closing my eyes and lifting my face to the sun.’
      • ‘I stood on my feet and narrowed my eyes, lifting my face.’
      • ‘A veil of acknowledgment swept across her face as she slowly lifted her eyes and shifted her expression to see me.’
      • ‘I didn't lift my face to look at her but spoke into her body.’
      • ‘Bent in two, I lifted my eyes and saw a roiling, black plume of ash and debris ascending into the sky.’
      • ‘Then some of them watch it on TV in the press box rather than lift their eyes two inches to see it for real.’
      • ‘A robust woman to my left continues sucking her lollipop; another, to my right, studiously resists lifting her eyes from a copy of King Lear.’
    2. 1.2no object Move upwards; be raised.
      ‘Thomas's eyelids drowsily lifted’
      • ‘He ducked in behind the cargo ship, which was lifting sluggishly upwards.’
      • ‘Even before she spoke, Gerald's head lifted upwards and he sniffed the air hopefully.’
      • ‘But the voices lifted, and hands gestured for me to start, drowning out my own movements.’
      • ‘Watch the miraculous gift of breath, as your diaphragm lifts up and pulls down.’
      • ‘I brought the tape home so my family could hear the 125 voices lifted in song.’
      • ‘The lid easily lifted off of the box.’
      • ‘You will have to ensure the sub-floor is level, and if in doubt install a hardboard surface to take the tiles and ensure they will not shift and lift in the future.’
      • ‘What better time to hear gay and lesbian voices lifted in song?’
      • ‘By the end of the telling her voice had lifted and she herself shared a giggle at the overall predicament.’
      • ‘His eyelids lifted, and his blue eyes focused directly on her.’
      • ‘Chris and Giovanni turned towards the energetic voice, eyebrows lifted.’
      • ‘Once, when she was in elementary school, the nun stood at the front of a church filled with children out in the pews with their voices lifted in song.’
      • ‘His eye-lids lifted and he managed a quirk of a smile in greeting.’
      • ‘His outside ears lift up, moving at the strange sounds.’
      • ‘But her voice lifted and wavered, and it ended up a question more than it was a statement.’
      • ‘Grandma's old eyelids lifted and her mouth fell open all at once.’
      • ‘At the same time, the deck lid lifts up and out of the way and the package shelf lifts up and moves back to meet the top.’
      • ‘Contracting her abs, she keeps her chin lifted and raises her upper torso as high as possible.’
    3. 1.3no object (of a cloud, fog, etc.) move upwards or away.
      ‘the factory smoke hung low, never lifted’
      • ‘As if in response, the rain had stopped, the clouds had lifted, and a welcome southern sun was shining.’
      • ‘He noticed that there was a fog lifting and it was obscuring the moonlight.’
      • ‘The fog was lifting, revealing a grey sky, and a metallic coloured ocean.’
      • ‘On Tuesday afternoon, clouds lifted from the site for the first time.’
      • ‘The storm clouds lift, the storm clouds descend.’
      • ‘The fog lifted at least, and Haley's eyes fluttered apart at last.’
      • ‘We drove back towards York, and the clouds slowly lifted as we came down Garrowby Hill and through Stamford Bridge.’
      • ‘I can't say I left with complete certainty and understanding, but some of the fog had lifted.’
      • ‘The opening quarter had been spoiled by a torrential downpour but as the clouds lifted, the action heated up.’
      • ‘However in the afternoon the fog lifted for a few hours to reveal the magnificent ship in all her glory.’
      • ‘A cloud has lifted following the change in management.’
      • ‘Once the fog lifted from his tortured mind the crystal-clear clarity of yesteryear returned with another story.’
      • ‘Fifteen minutes later the clouds lifted and the sun began to shine again.’
      • ‘The dark and dirge-like clouds lift for a few rays of petrified beauty in melodies or in single, sustaining piano notes, achieving a smooth, even balance.’
      • ‘The fog is lifting, but too slowly, and we are just approaching one-quarter mile now.’
      • ‘The fog had lifted somewhat when we arrived, which is why they were able to successfully land.’
      • ‘The dark cloud has lifted to reveal a red haze, if you will.’
      • ‘When the clouds lift, you can see a patchwork of clearcuts and roads carved into the slopes.’
      • ‘Nor does it see the clouds lifting soon, whoever wins today's election.’
      • ‘Yet when the clamour died away, the mists lifted to reveal what had been achieved.’
      clear, rise, disperse, dissipate, disappear, vanish, dissolve, be dispelled, thin out, scatter
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    4. 1.4 Increase the volume of (one's voice)
      ‘she lifted her voice in a great shout’
      ‘Willie sang boldly, lifting up his voice’
      • ‘Before he climbed into the back seat, he turned to the house and lifted his voice to its full volume.’
      • ‘So when some police officers do that, my voice will be lifted primarily to find out why they would do such a thing, not to call for their heads.’
      amplify, raise, make louder, louden, increase
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    5. 1.5 Increase (a price or amount)
      ‘the building society lifted its interest rates by 0.75 of a point’
      • ‘It is perfectly true that an individual firm, or even several firms, can increase profits by monopolizing their product markets and lifting the price.’
      • ‘The level has now been lifted from the 1992 level to be equal to the adjusted consumer price index for this year, 2004.’
      • ‘The company lifted its vehicle-use gas price by 0.2 yuan to 2.1 yuan per cubic metre last month.’
      • ‘The lamb trade is lifting steadily and a price of 165p is now standard with the better quality continental sheep making up to 170p/kilo.’
      • ‘The ability to boost prices is helping to lift margins despite rising costs.’
      • ‘It warned that it expected raw material prices to lift by a similar amount this year.’
      • ‘Farmers are now expecting prices to lift by an equivalent amount.’
      • ‘The arable sector is more difficult to predict but the appalling weather, combined with increased demand from the animal feed sector, could lift prices to compensate at least in part.’
      • ‘The rally in oil prices should lift profits at the oil company's exploration and production division.’
      • ‘The enormous wartime demand lifted prices and finally ended more than a decade of calamity and collapse on the American farm.’
      • ‘If the Reserve Bank lifts rates this week it will shock the markets, but few will be surprised if rates rise again by year's end.’
      • ‘That should spark the economy and corporate profit growth, lifting stock prices, investors say.’
      • ‘Asian suppliers are lifting prices as demand remains strong and material costs increase.’
      • ‘Investors want businesses to concentrate on pumping up the bottom line and lifting stock prices.’
      • ‘Refining alcohol would use tapioca as a raw material and the new industry is expected to lift the price of this agricultural product.’
      • ‘It is simply a method by which the overall ‘health’ levels will be lifted.’
      • ‘In addition to war fears, oil prices were also lifted by a snowstorm which hit the east of the US over the weekend.’
      • ‘By hitting production and refining capacity it has pushed up an already high oil price, lifted petrol prices and led to shortages.’
      • ‘Australia's shipping lines are lifting prices to get back in the black.’
      • ‘This prompted tracker funds to buy the stock, lifting the share price even higher.’
      increase, raise, lift
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    6. 1.6 Hit or kick (a ball) high into the air.
      • ‘A bowler who exerts a lot of energy into lifting and turning the ball to get a lot of revolutions and hook.’
      • ‘Howell lifted the resultant free kick over the bar.’
      • ‘He'll never hit long homers, but he has such remarkable bat control that he can alter his swing to lift the ball.’
      • ‘On the next pitch, Dent lifted a high fly ball toward left field.’
      • ‘With the ball lifted over his closest marker, he dispatched a powerful half volley.’
      • ‘When you have to lift or flip the ball into the air, you bring more moving parts into play, and this hurts your feel.’
      • ‘Flintoff bowled a widish one which Kasprowicz lifted to third man, but a diving Simon Jones could not hold on.’
      • ‘In the ninth, the devilish player lifted a long fly ball that fell behind him in center for a pinch-hit triple.’
      • ‘Huckerby looked odds-on to score as he lifted the ball towards goal but Michael Oakes read the situation well and made an outstanding block.’
      • ‘The second lifted alarmingly off a length but was down the leg side and Bradman was able to duck and let it past.’
      • ‘The batter lifted a short fly ball to center field where the Orioles' Jackie Brandt made a shoe-string catch of the ball.’
      • ‘When they're both going, it's like watching two thrashing machines, one crashing the ball through gully and point and the other lifting anything within reach over mid wicket.’
    7. 1.7 Improve the rank or position of (a person or team)
      ‘this victory lifted United into third place’
      • ‘The victory over Rovers marked City's first three-point haul of September and lifted the Minstermen back up to fifth in the Division Three table.’
      • ‘His healthy cheque lifts him to 30th on the money list but I think a new approach to the tour will bring more victories for the young man from Perth.’
      • ‘The inimitable spring is still there, although no longer quite as powerful as a decade ago when it lifted him head and shoulders above the English game.’
      • ‘Many fans are asking for a player clear-out to lift the team off the bottom of the Superleague.’
      • ‘His victory and talent therefore lifted him into the Elite category.’
      • ‘There is a steel determination between both panel of players to lift Carlow to new levels and silence the critics once and for all.’
      • ‘It would be easy for Kitna to be angry; he played a major role in lifting the team from awful to competitive last year.’
      • ‘The victory was enough to lift Harden up to third from bottom, leaving Thackley and Silsden in the relegation zone with two games to go.’
      • ‘Cooke kicked his fifth goal from six attempts to polish off a memorable win which lifts Hull into fourth place.’
      • ‘It is Woods' fourth Masters title and his ninth Major Championship victory, and the win lifts him back to number one in the world.’
      • ‘His direct running has caused problems for defences and his increased goal threat has lifted him to the top of the scoring charts at Man City with nine goals.’
      • ‘He is considered a mid - to late-round pick at this point, but a strong postseason could lift him to as high as the third round.’
      • ‘In La Liga, he scored 16 goals and created many more with his passes and runs off the ball, lifting Real to a league championship.’
      • ‘Haga's double victory lifted him from fourth to third in the overall rankings.’
      • ‘It lifted him into third place, nine shots off the pace.’
    8. 1.8 Perform cosmetic surgery on (part of the body) to reduce sagging.
      ‘surgeons lift and remove excess skin from the face and neck’
      • ‘When surgeons perform a facelift they lift the skin of the face and neck and expose a raw surface.’
      • ‘The mid-facelift is performed to lift this soft tissue back into a higher more youthful appearance.’
      • ‘This allows the nipple and areola complex to be lifted.’
      • ‘The corneal periphery scars, and this is why a flap can be lifted months later for enhancement.’
      • ‘The skin will then be lifted up, pulled back and any excess will be trimmed off.’
    9. 1.9 Dig up (plants or root vegetables)
      ‘the end of September is the time to lift and store carrots’
      • ‘In most parts of the country, plants grown from tubers, as well as plants that have been lifted and stored over winter, should be started indoors.’
      • ‘They should be well rooted within 12 months when they can be lifted and transplanted or potted up.’
      • ‘Mulch heavily in fall, or if soil freezes, lift and store bulbs.’
      • ‘Cannas and dahlias may need to be lifted and stored.’
      • ‘These are among the small number of bulbs that prefer to be lifted and planted when they are green.’
      • ‘You can control it by removing the affected leaves, but badly diseased plants should be lifted and destroyed.’
      • ‘Tender bulbs can be either treated as annuals and composted or tossed out, or they can be lifted and stored.’
      • ‘After a number of years it may become necessary to lift crowded plantings of bulbs in order to spread them out and revitalize the soil.’
      • ‘Farmers can now produce two crops of new potatoes, by re-planting when they lift the first crop.’
      • ‘Cuttings should be left in place until autumn next year, when they can be lifted and transplanted.’
      • ‘Most other glads need to be lifted and stored at the end of the growing season.’
      • ‘This can be done without any appreciable harm to the plant, though of course it is better to wait until the rhizomes have matured in July before lifting and planting.’
      • ‘Except in extreme northern zones, where they must be lifted in fall, Galtonia will withstand winter if planted in a sunny spot and heavily mulched.’
      • ‘I've been told that lifting the bulbs, storing them for the summer and replanting them in the fall will improve their performance.’
      • ‘First, moisten the soil around the plant several days before lifting.’
      • ‘We have also started marking out a new design in what will become the flower garden, and some of the turf has already been lifted.’
      dig up, pick, pull up, dig out of the ground, root out, unearth, take up
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  • 2with object and adverbial of direction Pick up and move to a different position.

    ‘he lifted her down from the pony's back’
    • ‘Then he lifted me up and I could see a beautiful creek area which was going to be part of a wild bird sanctuary or something like that.’
    • ‘Daddy put a cushion on the carrier, lifted me up and told me to keep out my feet so that they would not get caught in the spokes of the wheel.’
    • ‘He lifted her up carefully, realizing that he had picked her up so many times that it hardly even mattered to either him or her anymore.’
    • ‘He picked her up and lifted her up almost on her shoulder.’
    • ‘Over a ton of weight was then lifted gingerly out of the soil by a crane.’
    • ‘She was lifted back onto the stretcher and another march began.’
    • ‘She lifted herself up to a sitting position, and pulled her face close to his, as if she was about to kiss him.’
    • ‘She pried her fingers from the root and lifted her up off the frozen ground.’
    • ‘Quickly and quietly, he lifted himself out of the pool, picked up the bucket and filled it with pool water.’
    • ‘I had felt a sharp pain, but ignored it and lifted Raine off the floor and picked her up once more.’
    • ‘It took four people to lift the trolley off the body.’
    • ‘And Jane felt as though a million bricks had been lifted off her shoulders.’
    • ‘She felt his strong arms snake behind her back, pulling her closer and lifting her up slightly so her toes were barely touching the ground.’
    • ‘Feeling something crunch beneath him, he lifts himself up and pulls a crinkled plastic bag from the cushion.’
    • ‘I know it's a cliche saying that I feel like a weight has been lifted from my shoulders, but I fully understand the root of the phrase.’
    • ‘He pressed something into my hand as he kissed me; he lifted himself up and pulled me up after him.’
    • ‘A giant compass depicting the life and times of a South Yorkshire community which traces its roots back to medieval times has been lifted into place.’
    • ‘I myself am lifted onto another stretcher, carried into the ambulance, and set down beside Michael.’
    • ‘The tray is pulled back under the car and lifted into its holding position.’
    pick up, grab, scoop up, gather up, snatch up, swoop up
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    1. 2.1 Transport by air.
      ‘a helicopter lifted 11 crew to safety from the ship’
      • ‘Among these were 2,132 people in isolated villages who were lifted out by helicopter.’
      • ‘Everything, every single nut, bolt, screw, girder, steel cable, had to be lifted to those heights by helicopter, and winched down.’
      • ‘He had been lifted up here by helicopter.’
      • ‘The group's handful of foreign staff, who were not hurt, were waiting for an American helicopter to lift them from the compound.’
      • ‘By the time a rescue helicopter lifted Don from the glacier, another storm threatened.’
      • ‘Naval helicopters could not lift army Land Rovers.’
      • ‘We asked for an army helicopter to come and lift him out.’
      • ‘The exciting discovery was apparently made when researchers were forced to break open the leg bone of a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil to lift it by helicopter.’
      • ‘Paratroopers who parachuted in will be lifted by crane back to their helicopters.’
      • ‘She was discovered by two men, who moved her on a sofa to higher ground, where she waited for a helicopter to lift her to hospital.’
      • ‘He and a local fire fighter were lifted by helicopter from an area on the front line when air crew lost sight of the men through the smoke.’
      • ‘A second helicopter was dispatched to lift him seven hours later.’
      • ‘Five men were injured and were lifted by medevac helicopter to another base.’
      • ‘The large polar tents and camping gear would remain at the Lake Victoria campsite and be lifted out by helicopter later that season.’
      • ‘It became so large that the aquarium arranged for it to be lifted by helicopter to the ocean.’
      • ‘Blankets and oxygen were pulled over to the canoeists and rescuers, who were left on the island until the RAF helicopter arrived and lifted them one by one over to the river bank.’
      • ‘Four Army helicopters have lifted around 400 giant bags of stone up the Lake District fells to help in the repair of popular eroded paths.’
      • ‘She was air lifted by helicopter to Airedale General Hospital at Steeton with non-life-threatening injuries.’
      • ‘Vertical replenishment primarily involves using helicopters to lift cargo from a supply ship to a combatant ship.’
      • ‘An RAF helicopter assisted the rescue, lifting both the climbers and team members to the bottom of the valley.’
      airlift, transport by air, transport, move, transfer, fly, convey, shift
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    2. 2.2 Enable (someone or something) to escape from an unpleasant situation.
      ‘the best way to lift nations out of poverty is through trade’
      • ‘Just half of the amount could pay off the international debt of 22 of the poorest countries in Africa, lifting millions of people out of poverty.’
      • ‘The idea was to lift the neediest children out of the cycle of poverty by helping them and their parents, all too often their lone mothers.’
      • ‘But you will transcend these privations because New York on foot lifts you out of yourself, simply by being itself.’
      • ‘We had them rocking at one point, with Tom Greaves scoring a goal that lifted us.’
      • ‘The deal is aimed at opening up global markets to producers from the developing world, enabling them to start lifting their countries out of poverty.’
      • ‘She was an actress with an opera singer's voice and vocal skills, which enabled her to lift her performances out of the banal into the realms of realism.’
      improve, boost, enhance, make better, invigorate, revitalize, upgrade, ameliorate
      View synonyms
  • 3with object Raise (a person's spirits or confidence)

    ‘we heard inspiring talks which lifted our spirits’
    • ‘Her heart broke at the thought of Rhea leaving and yet the other girl's confidence and hope lifted up her own heart.’
    • ‘It was the line about ‘laughing out loud,’ however, that lifted the Professor's spirits and gave him the hope to carry on.’
    • ‘‘We haven't got anyone with the inspiration to lift us up and push us on after that first goal,’ he said.’
    • ‘I was sure that he would lift people's moods so I decided to design a card, which I sent to family and friends.’
    • ‘His voice lifts the soul and spirit inspiring our party of schoolchildren to take an excitingly fresh tilt at the English countryside.’
    • ‘Certainly the large crowd in the main stand went away feeling they had had their money's worth and lifted both teams with the excellent atmosphere they created.’
    • ‘The early goal in that second period helped lift us, gave us something to hold on to, and from then on we played well.’
    • ‘It was a grand day, too, autumn cold, dry, and with bright sunshine to lift the spirits.’
    • ‘‘They lifted his spirits and encouraged him to go for it,’ she said.’
    • ‘Your letters did much to boost his morale and lift his spirits.’
    • ‘It is supposed to stimulate the mind and lift the spirits.’
    • ‘This is powerful, tender, big-hearted and dangerously exciting music that's fit to lift the spirits and raise parties from the dead.’
    • ‘He used his pace, height and strength to defend and said that the sight of the flying Irish tricolours lifted him.’
    • ‘Over the decades, the beautiful game has helped to boost and bolster the nation's morale and has lifted spirits even in the darkest of times.’
    • ‘For here is a player who can turn a game in an instant, can lift a team with a moment of daring and brilliance.’
    • ‘It was about getting my head down and getting through the game and the goal lifted me a little bit.’
    • ‘But in the end, once I got to the start line and realised all the people really wanted me to get a medal, it lifted me.’
    • ‘It was a bit like Liverpool and Chelsea the other night when the Liverpool fans were sensational and lifted their team.’
    • ‘Every donation is valuable to us, but a gift of this size lifts everyone's spirits.’
    • ‘He totally lifted my spirits and gave me a confidence boost.’
    • ‘Bright colors lift spirits, so give the black in your wardrobe a rest for the next two months.’
    boost, raise, buoy up, elevate, give a lift to, cheer up, perk up, enliven, uplift, brighten up, lighten, ginger up, gladden, encourage, stimulate, arouse, revive, restore
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    1. 3.1no object (of a person's mood) become happier.
      ‘suddenly his heart lifted and he could have wept with relief’
      • ‘My heart began to lift at that point, as I realized that not everyone shared the same hatred for my family.’
      • ‘He walked into the restaurant and the mood lifted.’
      • ‘At this point I am suddenly aware that the previous intense heaviness and feeling of irritation is lifting.’
      • ‘I felt my morale lifting by discovering this simple fact.’
      • ‘His heart lifted and he feared he would float around if he could when he learned that she wanted to spend more time around him.’
      • ‘The sadness from the mass mood had lifted and everyone felt at ease.’
      • ‘The sorrow lifted from his face and he smiled, giving me the urge to grab him and kiss him.’
      • ‘Depression had lifted and he was relaxed and ‘feeling good’.’
      • ‘However, it was clear to see her droopy mood was lifting.’
      • ‘But as her depression lifted, in the spring, she would suddenly begin to notice it again.’
      • ‘The chemical depression lifts and you slowly start to become yourself again - with all that entails, ups and downs.’
      • ‘By about 10: 30 I was awake again and the funk had lifted, so we set our sights on a first attempt at the Louvre.’
      • ‘I thought my mood would miraculously lift once I didn't have to deal with hate mail and evil comments.’
      • ‘Thanks, but as you can see, her mood is finally lifting, thanks to Timmy, Robert, and some close friends.’
      • ‘That will give him enormous confidence and you can tell his mood is lifting.’
      • ‘Yet he advises patients to bear with it because the depression will ultimately lift and sleep problems diminish.’
      • ‘When the mood does lift, it does nothing to tarnish the wistful sadness of the record.’
      • ‘Her mood lifted momentarily at the thought of the couple, but it didn't last.’
      • ‘Another acknowledged the troops for a job well done, and morale lifted 100 percent.’
      • ‘The only problem was that no matter what she did the boredom wouldn't lift.’
  • 4with object Formally remove or end (a legal restriction, decision, or ban)

    ‘the European Community lifted its oil embargo against South Africa’
    • ‘But as taboos about the body gradually lifted and the human sciences advanced, the knowledge of nervousness slowly changed.’
    • ‘It has paid lobbyists to persuade government ministers to lift restrictions on operating casinos.’
    • ‘When the ban was finally lifted, in 2000, the cultural context had changed dramatically.’
    • ‘The ban on planting Barbary has been lifted in many communities where wheat production is not a livelihood.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, last week the protective notice issued to 22 staff at the South East Regional Airport was been lifted.’
    • ‘The latest surge follows Taiwan's decision last year to lift some restrictions on investing in China.’
    • ‘He lifted wage and price controls, which triggered inflation.’
    • ‘He is also asking the Treasury to cancel the currency fluctuation bands and to lift the restrictions on the issue of short-term debt certificates.’
    • ‘But the government Monday lifted the ban, and said it would welcome aid.’
    • ‘Some restrictions for senior and disabled permit holders using the local public transport system will be lifted from Sunday.’
    • ‘Also on Monday, the ban on parking within 300 feet of an airport terminal will be lifted.’
    • ‘Provincial and federal bans on offshore oil and gas development are also expected to be lifted in the near future.’
    • ‘This situation will change in 2001 when that monopoly is lifted, allowing other phone operators to install equipment and offer their own local services.’
    • ‘In Europe, the ban would have to be lifted by the aviation authorities in the individual Member States.’
    • ‘The decision to lift the ban was a result of a ‘regular thorough check-up’ of all orders of the past few years, the Government said.’
    • ‘The embargo on this press release has been lifted ahead of schedule.’
    • ‘If the war ends soon and the trade sanctions are lifted, oil prices are likely to fall even further.’
    • ‘But this could now be lifted if member states agree to the guidelines.’
    • ‘Restrictions on light aircraft and helicopter flights were lifted overnight.’
    • ‘No one doubts that there is a growing groundswell of opinion that sanctions must be lifted or at least reduced so that the innocent do not continue suffering.’
    cancel, raise, remove, withdraw, revoke, rescind, annul, void, discontinue, countermand, relax, end, stop, terminate
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  • 5with object Carry off or win (a prize or event)

    ‘she staged a magnificent comeback to lift the British Open title’
    • ‘16 teams are taking part and a case can be made for at least half of those lifting the trophy come the end of the tournament.’
    • ‘He made up for a series of near misses by lifting the main event at Openshaw Park in Bury.’
    • ‘Despite that, the Scorpions pulled back to within three points, but Liverpool played out the final minute to lift the trophy.’
    • ‘Oxenhope now need four points from four games to lift the trophy and with a club record 11 straight victories under their belt this should not be to much to ask.’
    • ‘The North Yorkshire side still have the opportunity to lift the championship and go into the game looking to return to the top of the division.’
    • ‘Most of the factors it takes for a club to lift the biggest prizes in the game appear to be there.’
    • ‘The others, AC Milan, came from behind to win the Champions League semi-final derby then lifted the trophy.’
    • ‘They scored the vital goals to help Albion lift the trophy in front of about 2,000 people.’
    • ‘They put the icing on the cake by lifting their first prize since 1996.’
    • ‘Manchester City lost out in the final of the Manchester Senior Cup to Oldham, who lifted the trophy for the first time in 28 years.’
    • ‘The premier division leaders took a further step towards lifting the Championship trophy for the first time since 1999 when they took 26 points from a draw at Easingwold.’
    • ‘Sheffield United are four times winners but not a lot of fans can remember the last time they lifted the trophy 80 years ago.’
    • ‘The K-League champs have made a series of high-profile signings since they lifted the trophy last December.’
    • ‘He paid tribute to his fellow players after lifting both trophies at an awards ceremony at Salford's Willows Variety Centre last night.’
    • ‘They are not a million miles away from being good enough to lift a trophy or break into the top six or seven in the league.’
    • ‘However if he can keep the Canaries in the Premiership then that will mean as much as lifting a trophy.’
    • ‘So strong is their position that they could even lose to United and lift the trophy by defeating Everton at home in the final game.’
    • ‘The Silsden side are out to complete a Challenge Cup treble after lifting the trophy in 2002 and 2003.’
    • ‘Liverpool were seemingly assured of the title in 1989 when they needed only to avoid a two-goal defeat at home to the Gunners to lift the trophy.’
    • ‘There's never been a better time for an unheralded side to enjoy a long run, even if lifting the trophy is sadly out of the question these days.’
    1. 5.1 Use (a person's work or ideas) without permission or acknowledgement.
      ‘this is a hackneyed adventure lifted straight from a vintage Lassie episode’
      • ‘And it adds piquancy to the tale that many of these changes appear to be lifted straight out of her own book of cultural reform.’
      • ‘The material was lifted almost verbatim from a six-year-old book.’
      • ‘The newspaper lifted the photos and used them in their advert.’
      • ‘Kicking off in 1944, the film opens with the type of prologue that could have been lifted straight from the Indiana Jones escapade, Raiders of the Lost Ark.’
      • ‘It could have been lifted straight out of the '80s.’
      • ‘One passage was lifted almost verbatim from a speech Bush made in February 2002.’
      • ‘I noted previously that it lifted quotes from their contexts out of the books of textual-criticism scholars.’
      • ‘Entire excerpts from previous movies are lifted, but with surreal twists on the already surreal situations insinuated to great comic success.’
      • ‘Designers themselves lift for different purposes, depending on the work at hand.’
      • ‘When the first hairstyle thief lifts your look, it will be said that they are copying your style rather than vice versa.’
      • ‘The congestion charge, introduced in London on Monday, has been lifted straight out of the professor's 1951 essay.’
      • ‘It is the kind of story which could have been lifted straight from the pages of one of her fictional tales.’
      • ‘His arguments are lifted straight from standard young earth creationist sources, as are his methods.’
      • ‘These scenes could have been lifted straight out of the Middle Ages.’
      plagiarize, pirate, copy, reproduce, poach, steal, borrow
      View synonyms
    2. 5.2informal Steal (something)
      ‘he had been caught lifting a coat from a department store’
      • ‘The grey sports car was parked on Masonfield Crescent when burglars broke in to lift the keys and make their getaway in the early hours on Saturday.’
      • ‘What is going on in Vienna is flatly felonious behavior that is lifting billions of dollars from the pockets of American citizens.’
      • ‘He plays a high-stakes burglar who lifts the diamonds and then gets hoodwinked by a rival gang.’
      • ‘He can also choose to pad his pockets by lifting the purses and jewels off passers-by as they walk through the streets.’
      • ‘‘Two people lifted a spoon to shoot up with yesterday and just walked out,’ she says.’
      • ‘Punitive expeditions destroyed crops and stores and lifted cattle, leaving villagers to starve as a salutary lesson for resistance or revolt.’
      • ‘After surveying this web site, one gets the urge to check to see that your wallet has not been lifted.’
      • ‘Apparently he immediately dismissed me as harmless - I wasn't going to shoplift or lift the cash register.’
      • ‘Twenty-five per cent of house burglaries are sneak-ins and almost half are offences, where the burglar lifts keys from the house to steal the car.’
      • ‘A Russian pensioner has been arrested after allegedly masterminding a scam geared to lifting the credit card number of Western tourists visiting Moscow cyber cafes.’
      • ‘I can cut wood and build fires, make tents of skin, sniff out a trail, steal chickens and eggs both, lift purses..’
      • ‘Packed shopping centres are heaving with pickpockets, who lift thousands of credit cards a day at this time of year.’
      steal, thieve, rob, pilfer, purloin, pocket, snatch, take, appropriate, abstract, help oneself to
      View synonyms
    3. 5.3informal Arrest (someone)
      ‘that night the army came and lifted Buckley’
      catch, apprehend, seize, arrest
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1British A platform or compartment housed in a shaft for raising and lowering people or things to different levels.

    ‘Alice went up to the second floor in the lift’
    North American term elevator
    as modifier ‘the lift door opened’
    • ‘Tragically, a fault meant the safety doors opened before the lift had arrived and he stepped in without realising.’
    • ‘An extension was built at the back with a lift to the fourth floor.’
    • ‘A fire crew manually reeled the lift to the nearest floor.’
    • ‘The next minute, my legs went like jelly and the lift doors opened.’
    • ‘The lift opened up on level six, causing Taylor to wrinkle up her nose, as the familiar smell of tank fluid filled the air.’
    • ‘I had nothing better to do so I hung around to watch the fire-crew arrive in their big red tender and pile out to open the lift doors and crank the lift down to the rescue point.’
    • ‘Being the nice, considerate girl I am, I opened the lift door for him to come in, when it was already almost 90% closed.’
    • ‘He thanked her quickly before he entered the lift to the third floor.’
    • ‘The lift door opened immediately and we entered.’
    • ‘They prised the doors open when the lift began filling with water from the sprinkler system.’
    • ‘Once you have cracked this, try lifting your pelvic floor upwards in stages, like a lift stopping at different floors, then bring it down again.’
    • ‘The lift door slowly opened, revealing several guards.’
    • ‘We all go back to staring at the lift doors willing them to open.’
    • ‘As the doors to the lift opened and we went in, I dug around for my black book.’
    • ‘The only traditional bricklaying was around the lift shaft in the rear courtyard.’
    • ‘When the lift doors open, they emerge in futuristic silver outfits and take their places at the control deck.’
    • ‘A building worker is recovering after falling 25 feet down an unfinished lift shaft after scaffolding gave way.’
    • ‘Is the lift shaft airtight when all the outer doors are closed?’
    • ‘The explosion gutted the lift shaft and damaged the door of the apartment.’
    • ‘The doors of the lift opened and we were in corridors quite obviously more modern, where the doors had no handles and the names of the occupants were written on small LED displays just by the side.’
    elevator, hoist
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A device incorporating a moving cable for carrying people up or down a mountain.
      ‘we zigzagged across the mountain from one lift to the next’
      • ‘It gives access to 125 miles of pistes and 460 lifts for around £100.’
      • ‘Can I climb mountains, ride a ski lift, and ski?’
      • ‘It has enough variety to please any telemarker with more than 3000 feet of vertical drop and a dozen lifts.’
      • ‘A maze of quality runs links lifts at the mountain top, the only fault being the lack of decent slopes heading back down into the town.’
      • ‘Why do we stretch to the limits of our stamina and sometimes risk our lives climbing mountains, when chair lifts and gondolas provide comfort?’
      • ‘No, we don't envy them the parking problems, the lift lines, or even the lifts themselves.’
      • ‘Development of vast acreages of adjacent public land for ski runs and lifts also takes its toll.’
      • ‘Cruising up the side of the mountain on a chair lift, the cold thin air brought tears to my eyes and I marvelled at the beauty of the peaks, the snow, the trees.’
      • ‘She needs time in downhill mode, and lifts are the way to get it.’
      • ‘However, the nursery slopes are also good and there are drag lifts, chair lifts and instructors to make it manageable.’
      • ‘Private investors are expected to inject a further 300 million euro into tourist infrastructure, lifts and ski-runs.’
      • ‘With the fire brigade's ladders too short to reach the lift, a mountain rescue team was called in to help.’
      • ‘But almost 50 square miles of ski mountaineering terrain make the lifts pale in comparison.’
      • ‘More than 80 lifts serve 220 kilometres of ski runs suitable for all abilities.’
      • ‘They snowboarded all over the mountain, using every lift and tow available to them.’
      • ‘The notice at the foot of the Grouse Mountain chair lift, warning that there are no easy routes from the top, means what it says.’
      • ‘The year before, I had begun getting her used to the mountains by carrying her on lifts and skiing down gentle slopes, holding her in my arms like a baby kangaroo.’
      • ‘Brando gave us a ride up the side of the mountain, to the first lift.’
      • ‘The resort's East Mountain has a quad lift that serves skiers, snowboarders, and snow bikers.’
      • ‘She rested her head on his shoulder as the lift slowly climbed the mountain.’
    2. 1.2 A built-up heel or device worn in a boot or shoe to make the wearer appear taller or to correct shortening of a leg.
      • ‘To keep your Achilles tendons happy it even has adjustable heel lifts.’
      • ‘If not - and because she doesn't like wearing the lifts in her shoes - she will suffer back pain.’
      • ‘Differences greater than 2 cm may merit correction with heel lifts.’
      • ‘I also get to wear little lifts in my shoes, which makes me feel like a total dork.’
      • ‘This season's styles range from sandals with barely a lift and lower heels, to teetering spikes that can do some serious damage.’
      • ‘On the other hand, folks who favor it say the double pivot compensates for the lower heel lift, and they say it thus has enough lift.’
      • ‘Showing more leg, when there is leg worth showing, will make you appear taller, as will a shoe with a little lift to it.’
      • ‘Some physicians have advocated the use of heel lifts to shorten the gastrocnemius muscle.’
      • ‘Can you recommend anyone who sells shoes with lifts?’
      • ‘They also feature a heel lift for reduced lower leg stress on ascents and a simple binding system with a fixed pivot rod.’
      • ‘He's also got a penchant for shoe lifts to add to his 5 foot 7 inch height.’
      • ‘Plus he wears lifts in his shoes which is a little weird.’
      • ‘Okay, now I understand the different heel lifts, but how do I rotate it?’
      • ‘His critics like to joke that at 67, he still wears lifts in his shoes.’
      • ‘The patients were rehabilitated in a boot with a heel lift and were permitted full weightbearing as soon as tolerated.’
  • 2An act of lifting.

    ‘weightlifters attempting a particularly heavy lift’
    • ‘When lifting heavy objects, keep your back straight, bend at the knees and power the lift with your legs.’
    • ‘The result is long legs, pointe shoes, pirouettes, leaps and lifts.’
    • ‘Their side-by-side combination spin was well synchronized, but the one-armed lift appeared somewhat shaky.’
    • ‘The other two days, go light on these lifts but heavy on all others.’
    • ‘The bodice was constricting like a corset that gave lift to my bosom, but thankfully I could still breathe.’
    • ‘That's why a classic lift called the bent press is one of my favorites.’
    • ‘This classic Olympic-style lift is an essential back and leg builder.’
    • ‘Substitutions can be made for the prescribed lifts if you lack the correct equipment.’
    • ‘There were none, except perhaps the slight lift of an eyebrow as he noticed Cory's gaze.’
    • ‘Rhinoplasty, tummy tucks, liposuction and eye lifts can provide a psychological boost and restore youthful confidence.’
    • ‘Teddy smirked and motioned to the bit of paper with a slight lift of his chin.’
    • ‘A two-handed lift is necessary, but two-handed lifts are much more difficult for most people to perform correctly.’
    • ‘On that summer league floor, James showed off the best of Magic Johnson's towering court vision, and had Jordan's lift to boot.’
    • ‘I never do burns for heavy compound lifts, such as squats or bent rows.’
    • ‘Adding strength in these two compound lifts will directly improve your bench press power.’
    • ‘The stronger you are, the faster and bigger you can grow, so continuously try to increase your lifts; but never at the expense of correct form.’
    • ‘Until a year or so ago, his lefthanded batting stance included a high leg lift in which he swung his right foot back and forth through the box like a pendulum, as a timing device.’
    • ‘To accomplish the latter, keep your heels close together and angle your toes slightly outward for lifts such as hack squats and leg presses.’
    • ‘Performing the right number of basic lifts in the correct manner will be the major focus of our program.’
    • ‘He appeared to get his lift wrong and could only manage a snatched, weak mid-high shot.’
    push, hoist, heave, thrust, shove, uplift, a helping hand
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1mass noun Upward force exerted by the air on an aerofoil or other structure, counteracting gravity.
      ‘separate engines provide lift and generate forward speed’
      • ‘Use only approach flaps, since they help provide lift, whereas landing flaps mainly produce drag.’
      • ‘I didn't find any but the lightest lift and landed five miles short.’
      • ‘Such torques are proposed to be counteracted anteriorly by lift forces generated by the head and pectoral fins.’
      • ‘Bolt lift is increased, but for this purpose speed of fire is not a priority.’
      • ‘The sudden loss of lift caused the airplane to descend rapidly to the runway.’
      • ‘We can work weak lift under the clouds and hang out.’
      • ‘Flaps do more than increase lift; they also increase drag, change pitch attitudes and so forth.’
      • ‘They plummeted as I stayed high and came in over their next weak lift.’
      • ‘Gliding works by having a gliding airfoil design that generates lift forces, keeping the animal in the air longer.’
      • ‘Dimples on spinning golf balls reduce air resistance and increase lift by creating turbulence in the air flowing past the balls.’
      • ‘Any secondary school physics text or pilot licence manual will tell you that aerofoils generate lift because of the Venturi effect.’
      • ‘I find light lift under very thin clouds and drift quickly down wind in the 22 mph breeze.’
      • ‘This makes it more agile, particularly at supersonic speeds; reduces drag; and gives it an overall increase in lift.’
      • ‘This helps increase lift, which is what you need at this point.’
      • ‘If an airplane wing provides lift (an airfoil), how does a plane fly upside down?’
      • ‘The phenomenon increases the ratio of lift to drag for a wing.’
      • ‘The spoiler is a plate along the upper surface of an airplane wing, which functions to reduce the lift and increase its drag.’
      • ‘Ideally, you want to feel the airplane's lift as if you were feeling the traction of a car on ice through the steering wheel.’
      • ‘I worked some weak lift under a big cloud then raced for the smoke.’
      • ‘It can decrease thrust, reduce lift, and increase drag.’
    2. 2.2 The maximum weight that an aircraft can raise.
      ‘the Puma tactical transport helicopter has a total lift of up to 5,500 lb’
      • ‘Under normal flying conditions, they do not increase the lift of the airplane or materially aid the maneuverability.’
      • ‘To sustain an airplane in the air it is enough that the lift be equal to the weight, but for an airplane take off the lift must be bigger than weight.’
      • ‘Just how large is the inertial force required to oscillate a wing relative to the total lift that the wing must support?’
    3. 2.3Cricket mass noun The tendency of a ball bowled to rise sharply on bouncing.
      • ‘He gained much lift and sharpness with his awkward wrong-footed deliveries.’
      • ‘However, eight balls later, a little extra lift from Zoysa was enough to snare India's maestro, the ball brushing his glove on the way through to Kaluwitharana.’
      • ‘He was a tall man standing at 6ft and when bowling he used his height well, getting lift and speed off the pitch.’
      • ‘The others get so much spin and lift that they bowl far more wicket-taking deliveries.’
      • ‘The left-arm fast bowler, extracting much lift, bowled with hostility to contain the batsmen.’
    4. 2.4 A rise in price, level, or amount.
      ‘the company has already produced a 10 per cent lift in profits’
      • ‘"Perhaps they are trying to give the share price a lift, " he said.’
      • ‘If the opinion of woolgrowers at a sheep industry seminar in Launceston is anything to go by, producers are pinning their hopes on a lift in prices.’
      • ‘And the third thing which has emerged just in the last few months in particular has been the big lift in commodity prices.’
      • ‘In the election it announced that it would provide tax refunds for first time babies with a view to encouraging a lift in the birth rate.’
      • ‘Beef prices are not strong enough to encourage suppliers to want to sell, and some are considering letting cattle out to grass in the hope of a lift in beef prices in April.’
      • ‘But, at long last, we have seen a lift in the price and there is a little more stability.’
      • ‘There is nothing better than a lift in beef prices at the start of September to put more pep in the step of producers and yesterday was one of those days.’
      • ‘Indeed, as I have said, it would give every single property owner in this country an immediate lift in the amount of money that is left in his or her pocket.’
      • ‘The price lift is not restricted to rice and oil.’
      • ‘Any sign of encouragement could give a lift to shares, which have been trading near their all-time low point and are at a discount to others in the sector.’
      • ‘It has been a big year with record profits, record sales and while a win in the ratings and a lift in profit margins.’
      • ‘And he predicts a big lift in goat prices is on the way.’
      • ‘A win to level the series would be remarkable and would also serve as a great confidence lift prior to their trip to New Zealand tomorrow, where they will compete in a five-match series.’
      • ‘The monthly gain was the biggest in almost two years and received its biggest lift from a 10 percent sales jump.’
      • ‘The targeted commercials yielded a 3 percent lift in total volume in the last quarter of running the spots.’
      • ‘Any cut in interest rates next month, which is looking increasingly likely, will be too late to stimulate an end-of-year lift in consumer spending.’
      • ‘Many people feel the urge for a caffeine or sugar lift at this time.’
      • ‘This victory will give Sligo a huge lift in confidence.’
      • ‘The politicians used the trust's billions to bestow favors on corporations whose share prices needed a lift or to bolster a sagging stock market.’
      • ‘But they appear to have escaped major damage, and that led to a drop in the oil price and a lift in US shares.’
      rise, leap, increase, upturn, upsurge, upswing, spiralling, escalation, elevation, boost, advance, augmentation
      View synonyms
    5. 2.5informal An instance of stealing or plagiarizing something.
      ‘in a speech he adopted the President's familiar hand motions—it was a lift’
  • 3A free ride in another person's vehicle.

    ‘Miss Green is giving me a lift to school’
    • ‘I had eschewed the offer of a lift from my parents, wishing to appear independent and a free spirit.’
    • ‘We all have stories about fellow pilots who gave us a lift when our airplanes were being stubborn, loaned us a car when we needed a ride or even taken us home to wait out the weather.’
    • ‘The lads would sneak away from school to get a lift on the circus vehicles as they approached the town.’
    • ‘She refused the offer of a lift back to the house she shared with three other students on Argyle Street.’
    • ‘And he got a lift home from none other than the Mayor of Bolton.’
    • ‘Or maybe you enjoy a lift home, chatting over the day's events?’
    • ‘They wanted a lift in her vehicle; there was no choice but to take them in.’
    • ‘The ride is akin to hitching a lift on the back of a horse drawn carriage.’
    • ‘But did he stay where he was and wait for the judge to give him a free lift in a police car courtesy of a bench warrant?’
    • ‘After it was done I needed a lift home, so I asked Steve.’
    • ‘He was a very private person but he would often give me a lift into Oxford if I was waiting for the bus.’
    • ‘A sleek black chauffeur-driven car pulled up and the elderly lady passenger asked if they would like a lift.’
    • ‘Sometimes motorists will give a lift to someone not knowing that the individual is carrying illegal items.’
    • ‘I forgot that Mack could've given me a lift… but it was too late to go all the way back to school because she would have left already.’
    • ‘Young drivers also appear willing to accept lifts from drivers they know to have taken illicit substances.’
    • ‘She almost wasn't, forgetting to book holiday and all, but she's got a free ticket, a lift down there.’
    • ‘It must have been the fine breakfast that dragged us out or the free lift from Tim.’
    • ‘His counsel said that he was merely trying to appear cool while waiting for lifts outside the Bus depot.’
    • ‘Fortunately I managed to get a lift into town and dashed home to change my ridiculous shoes.’
    • ‘On a walk, at the theatre, in a bus, at a restaurant or a roadside joint, or even when a stranger, who is given a lift by you, rides on the pillion, people are strangely silent.’
    car ride, ride, run, drive, transportation, journey
    View synonyms
  • 4in singular A feeling of confidence or cheerfulness.

    ‘winning this match has given everyone a lift’
    • ‘If you know how to, supply these key resources, you'll give yourself an instant lift.’
    • ‘As soon as we arrived at Frankton the sight of Lake Wakatipu and the mountains gave us a lift in spirits.’
    • ‘It was the first time this year and gave a satisfying lift to my spirits.’
    • ‘The office will be air-conditioned with stimulating scents and extra oxygen - to give a physical and psychological lift.’
    • ‘Their reaction, I'd guess, was a touch of awe mingled with the instant lift we all felt the moment we entered this space.’
    • ‘After working alone, talk, laugh and interact with others for an instant lift.’
    • ‘He gave a lift and a spur to a BBC office which could often be in a state of chaos.’
    • ‘Knowing we have now got a match with Fulham to look forward to gives everyone a massive lift and it can only be good for your confidence.’
    • ‘If there is a winner it will give this team a big impetus and a massive lift going into the final four games.’
    • ‘But don't expect media giants to get a big lift from their Chinese operations anytime soon.’
    • ‘‘It has given the security department a lift and it is encouraging that there is now a serious deterrent,’ he said.’
    • ‘We want to give them a lift, encouraging the good ones to stick with it and resist the temptation to jack it all in and run off with a Spanish waiter.’
    • ‘Just as champagne gives you an instant lift so chocolate, as it melts in the mouth, creates a feeling of euphoria and wellbeing.’
    boost, fillip, pick-me-up, stimulus, impetus, encouragement, spur, reassurance, aid, help, push
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • lift a finger (or hand)

    • usually with negativeMake the slightest effort to do something, especially to help someone.

      ‘he never lifted a finger to get Jimmy released from prison’
      • ‘Local councillors come and go, all express a sincere desire to commiserate, but none has ever lifted a finger.’
      • ‘The question surely shouldn't be whether a politician lifts a finger to help a friend - but whether that help, if given, results in a distortion of policy, corruption or special treatment that is unavailable to others.’
      • ‘Indeed, for a mere $100,000 a year, your bathroom can be immaculately cleaned without ever lifting a finger.’
      • ‘The sad fact is that many of these champions of liberty have never lifted a finger to defend said liberty with arms or real effort.’
      • ‘Can all of those who are opposed to the sale of the local amenity say with their hand on their heart that they ever lifted a finger to try to make a success of it?’
      • ‘You might have heard about scam merchants offering to find grants for businesses, pocketing a fat consultancy fee and disappearing into the distance without lifting a finger.’
      • ‘Has anyone ever heard a politician offer to lift a finger for single people?’
      • ‘And couldn't he lift a finger to help once and a while?’
      • ‘Because if you see the frantic, almost hysterical, run-up to a Christmas Day blow-out as just one big hassle, there is a whole host of exciting options on hand to give you the very best Yuletide - without lifting a finger!’
      • ‘You can play this song and think of politicians, or officialdom, or your favourite target of hatred - its strength lies in its subtlety, its ability to point at decaying humanity without ever lifting a finger.’
  • lift his (or its) leg

    • informal (of a male dog) urinate.

      • ‘He called, ‘Please tell me that critter isn't going to lift his leg to the tree.’’
      • ‘If we are to gauge his abilities off his TKO win in 5 he might be lifting his leg on the wrong tree.’
      • ‘Mr and Mrs This-is-Max-he's a-Labrador took themselves and Max off so fast the poor dog didn't have time to lift his leg on the gate post as he passed.’
      • ‘In the short one-block distance from our house to hers he had already emptied his bladder, so I told her that if he lifted his leg to mark anything that she should just keep walking because he would be marking with imaginary pee.’
      • ‘When he got in the house he promptly lifted his leg and sprayed the furniture.’
      • ‘I saw this little dog walk over to my car and lift his leg though.’
      • ‘Red lifted his leg and peed happily upon a small sage bush.’
      • ‘Chuck bolted outside to his favorite pee spot, lifted his leg, and I kid you not, he stood there for over 60 seconds holding the perfect yoga position.’
      • ‘He made across the grass towards the gate where the Little Train used to run, lifting his leg periodically to mark his territory, stepped through out into the road and proceeded off towards the beach.’
      • ‘It is found guilty of lifting its leg and soiling the original theatrical aspect ratio of this film.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • lift off

    • (of an aircraft, spacecraft, or rocket) take off, especially vertically.

      ‘the helicopters lifted off at 1030 hours’
      • ‘Tailwinds produce excessive rolling speeds prior to lifting off and following touchdown.’
      • ‘The coordinator could not contain the gloat as the aircraft lifted off to record another on-time take off.’
      • ‘They can improve current systems, or develop new products, like a rocket that lifts off on invisible laser beams.’
      • ‘As the aircraft lifts off, put in a slow, steady, forward elevator pressure - just enough to keep it from climbing, but not so much that you descend back onto the runway.’
      • ‘Plan your takeoff, so you'll lift off before the rotation point of the other aircraft.’
      • ‘One by one, the insects march up blades of grass, waiting until dusk to lift off like miniature helicopters into the night.’
      • ‘The report says that as the aging helicopter lifted off the deck of HMCS Iroquois, the pilot gave the aircraft too much power.’
      • ‘As night approached, four CH - 46 Sea Knight helicopters lifted off the Roosevelt's deck.’
      • ‘By the time a STARS helicopter lifts off, a team of experts has already gone into action - both in the air and on the ground.’
      • ‘The first airship is due to lift off from a special base being constructed at a hanger in the village of Briesen near Berlin.’
      • ‘To applause from watching crowds, it lifts off from Heathrow to successfully completed its first full transatlantic flight since its grounding last year.’
      • ‘One alleged problem was that, nearing its 252 mph top speed, it began to lift off like an aeroplane.’
      • ‘Finally, when the airplane has less than 20 feet of runway left, there is a sudden change in the pitch of the shouts as everyone screams at once, and at the very last moment the airplane lifts off and is airborne.’
      • ‘Witnesses said the takeoff roll was long and the airplane went almost the entire length of the runway before lifting off.’
      • ‘Then - the mission complete - the helicopters lifted off, turning for the border and safety.’
      • ‘Marine Cobra helicopters lifted off as tracer fire criss-crossed the north end of the airport, it said.’
      • ‘One of his mightiest inventions was the Dirigibelle, a vast steam-powered Zeppelin which would lift off from Brighton Pier, and float across the English Channel.’
      • ‘The first privately funded spacecraft lifts off from an airstrip in the Mojave Desert.’
      • ‘He shouted over the rotor noises of the helicopter as it lifted off from the site.’
      • ‘The Douglas engineers he contacted said if he added another 1000 gallons the airplane would not lift off.’
      take off, be launched, blast off, leave the ground, become airborne, take to the air, take wing
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse lypta, of Germanic origin; related to loft.

Pronunciation

lift

/lɪft/