Main definitions of lifecast in English

: lifecast1lifecast2

lifecast1

noun

  • A three-dimensional representation of a subject created from a mould of their living body.

    ‘epoxy resin is used to make the lifecasts, which are then finished in bronze’
    • ‘His latest installation, The Silent Evolution at Mexico's National Marine Park of Cancun, features 400 human lifecasts and their aquatic friends.’
    • ‘Each model or client shows the same fascination and wonderment with their lifecast as an infant does when first recognising itself in a mirror.’
    • ‘I believe that things like the pediment of the Parthenon were also generated from lifecasts.’
    • ‘It's a great way for people who enjoy lifecasting to express themselves through video.’
    • ‘On the demand side, this lifecasting stuff would never have caught on if there wasn't an audience for what it produces.’
    • ‘Once the cast has been taken you need to wait for four to eight weeks for your lifecast to be completed.’
    • ‘Bodily associations with wax date back to its earliest representational uses in ancient Greek and Roman funerary rites, where it served as a pliable, skinlike covering for plaster lifecasts.’
    • ‘The network features online lifecasting and live video streaming produced by more than 12,500,000 registered users.’
    • ‘The inspiration, if not the direct model, clearly comes from the sixteenth-century Nuremberg goldsmith Wenzel Jamnitzer, who specialised in the creation of elaborate artefacts decorated with lifecasts of small animals.’
    • ‘When all else fails, there are always "lifecasting" websites that allow users to set up video cameras and stream whatever is in front of the camera onto the internet.’
    • ‘100% silk shirts worn by Geller go for $135; and a lifecast of Geller's hand is yours for a mere $3,000.’
    • ‘Prosthetic alginate, Hydrocal Plaster, or skin-safe silicone rubber is used to make the lifecast.’
    • ‘The students made this lifecast using the George Segal method.’
    • ‘But lifecasting doesn't stop with people.’
    • ‘Plaster is poured into the impression to make a lifecast, or perfect replica of the person's face.’
    • ‘If they really want to appeal to the likes of me, Rob, Milo and the rest of the self-appointed Twitterati they should switch off the Wi-Fi, ban social networking and lifecasting and instead pitch the park as what it is: a holiday away from all that virtual nonsense.’
    • ‘He was the first of a dozen young people at the center who posed for lifecasts by John Ahearn.’
    • ‘Lifecasting comes naturally to today’s youths, who are used to living their lives in public, posting details of every hookup and breakup on their Facebook or MySpace pages.’
    • ‘Although the novelty of "life-casting" has worn off to some degree, that hasn’t stopped more and more people from cracking open a laptop and sharing their previously private moments with the world, live and unedited.’
    • ‘Rachel visits the client to take the casting then finishes off the lifecast at home.’
    • ‘The measurements from a lifecast were entered into a computer model-making program that allows her to scale a head to any size with utter fidelity.’
    • ‘Lifecasting shows life in unabridged form, programming without a thematic concept, without a casting director, without an editor.’
    • ‘Like Segal, Hanson used lifecasts as the basis for his fibreglass and resin figures but also applied lifelike colour, dressed them in real clothing, and provided them with real accessories.’
    • ‘This is something that’s been bothering me for a while: with all the push toward lifecasting, should we worry that criminals are going to get a little smarter?’
    • ‘For each of his personally selected subjects, Ball starts with a plaster lifecast.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as noun lifecasting
  • Create (a three-dimensional representation of a subject) from a mould of their living body.

    ‘lifecasting is accurate enough to capture fingerprints, wrinkles, and even hair follicles’
    ‘the artist's debut features nude human figures lifecast from rubber, bronze, and polyurethane’
    • ‘I fell into the art of lifecasting when taking a break from my career in television to have a baby.’
    • ‘Lifecasting is a specialist area of sculpting where moulds are taken directly from a person's body, and a near-exact replica then cast in plaster, stone powder, resin or even metals.’
    • ‘The dancer's body is without doubt a joy to work with and most suited to the art of lifecasting - being both elegant yet well-defined and engraved with fascinating peculiarities arising from years of hard work and repetitive movements.’
    • ‘Lifecasting should only be attempted by trained professionals using the appropriate materials.’
    • ‘The art of lifecasting dates back as far as Cleopatra's Egypt.’
    • ‘The mould is re-assembled and oil-based clay is poured in to create a pliable version of the bust which can be carefully sculpted to replace any wrinkles or skin texture which may have been lost or damaged in the lifecasting process.’
    • ‘To begin creating the prop, we lifecast the arm of model Matthew Reynolds.’
    • ‘A typical object for a scholar's study, lifecast bronze crabs survive in some numbers and are often stated to have been made in sixteenth-century Padua.’
    • ‘The best comparable surviving example of this practice is his silver writing casket in Vienna, the lid of which consists of ten small rectangular panels, each mounted with a lifecast animal.’
    • ‘Art, photography, and lifecasting combine to create unique images.’
    • ‘Alginate is often used for life-casting, but for this piece a silicone based material is being used.’
    • ‘The event will feature a wide range of mediums, such as Raku pottery, sculpture, lifecasting, abstract paintings, jewelry, digital art, photography, watercolor and mixed media.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from life and cast.

Pronunciation

lifecast

/ˈlʌɪfkɑːst/

Main definitions of lifecast in English

: lifecast1lifecast2

lifecast2

noun

  • A continuous video of one's day-to-day activities broadcast live on the Internet.

    ‘he strapped a camera to the side of his head and invited the world to share his unabridged lifecast’
    • ‘The truly committed could start a 24-hour lifecast of their daily activities reminiscent of television's Big Brother.’
    • ‘Seemingly every move he's made in recent months has been captured and archived in what has amounted to a lifecast.’
    • ‘He is aware of the limitations of the site's current lifecast offerings.’
    • ‘For me this lifecast is an exciting journey and an on-going learning process: I'm hoping my readers will benefit from seeing someone just like them who is unafraid to try just about anything.’
    • ‘It's a formula not vastly different from that of American blog sensation Julia Allison, whose "lifecast" resulted in her becoming something of a real-life celebrity.’
    • ‘Had they not deported Hidalgo, it's unlikely so many people would have paid attention to his lifecast.’
    • ‘Watching strangers' lifecasts or reading lengthy gut-wrenching blog posts is for people who have lots of time.’
    • ‘She uses her blog as a way to share and experience parenting, as well as to maintain a lifecast of her children.’
    • ‘Dedicated users may even set up 24-hour lifecasts of their daily activities.’
    • ‘Her lifecast details every minute of her daily life, mostly what she wore and to which event.’
    • ‘Two years ago, he launched Justin.tv, on which he aimed to broadcast lifecasts, unedited screenings of everyday life which could even make Big Brother appear vaguely interesting.’
    • ‘Wilson, who is raising a daughter, started his own lifecast in March 2007.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as noun lifecasting
  • Broadcast (a continuous video of one's day-to-day activities) live on the Internet.

    ‘lifecasting creates an interactive, never-ending soap opera’
    ‘they eagerly lifecast their entire existence via the web’
    • ‘Lifecasting shows life in unabridged form, programming without a thematic concept, without a casting director, without an editor, without anything in the subject’s life that is much different than the audience’s.’
    • ‘It’s a great way for people who enjoy lifecasting to express themselves through video.’
    • ‘On the demand side, this lifecasting stuff would never have caught on if there wasn't an audience for what it produces.’
    • ‘Lifecasting comes naturally to today's youths, who are used to living their lives in public, posting details of every hookup and breakup on their Facebook or MySpace pages.’
    • ‘His ability to lifecast while simultaneously hosting the Oscars was kind of the highlight of my 2011 so far.’
    • ‘Paul, armed with a video camera, a laptop, Wi-Fi, and a host of other gadgets, lifecast the whole event on the social networking site Twitter.’
    • ‘They truly believed that lifecasting would become a popular pastime, once they had proved the concept with their custom-designed portable camera.’
    • ‘This is something that’s been bothering me for a while: with all the push toward lifecasting, should we worry that criminals are going to get a little smarter?’
    • ‘Jordan now lifecasts for NonSociety, a trio of personality-driven blogs.’
    • ‘Although the novelty of life-casting has worn off to some degree, that hasn’t stopped more and more people from cracking open a laptop and sharing their previously private moments with the world.’
    • ‘The idea was conceived in 2007 when Justine began lifecasting on Justin.tv.’
    • ‘When all else fails, there are always lifecasting websites that allow users to set up video cameras and stream whatever is in front of the camera onto the internet.’

Origin

Early 21st century: from life and broadcast.

Pronunciation

lifecast

/ˈlʌɪfkɑːst/