Definition of lieutenant in English:

lieutenant

noun

  • 1A deputy or substitute acting for a superior.

    ‘one of the Prime Minister's most trusted lieutenants’
    • ‘His vast influence in the north-east made Charles I appoint him king's lieutenant in the north.’
    • ‘He left some time after the guard was set up, and left his lieutenant in charge.’
    • ‘There the saluting officer was Major Edmund Gartside, who is deputy lord lieutenant of Manchester.’
    • ‘Thereafter he was Edward's chief lieutenant in the north.’
    • ‘The elusiveness of the leader and his lieutenants has gnawed at officials and has cast doubt on their claims of having disrupted the group.’
    • ‘Those invited were picked partly by the Prince and partly from nominations by lord lieutenants, the Queen's representatives in different parts of the country, as well as charities involved in the rural community.’
    • ‘Since human beings (unlike animals, or trees) are created in the image of God, and possess powers of reason which are a reflection of God's, they may act in the world as delegates or lieutenants of God.’
    • ‘She also looks fabulous enough to make a loyal lieutenant betray the hand that fed him.’
    • ‘The only problem was Hunter never really knew what his trusted lieutenant was thinking.’
    • ‘Also, it enables the " benevolent dictator " and " trusted lieutenants " structures to emerge.’
    • ‘A raft of top bosses and small-fry lieutenants have been nabbed since then.’
    • ‘Nasser dominated Egypt post-1952 and Sadat served as a trusted lieutenant.’
    • ‘Eventually he gets promoted up to being a lieutenant and becomes the right-hand man to the family boss.’
    • ‘In 1978 he was appointed deputy lord lieutenant for Wiltshire.’
    • ‘While he sits at the apex, it is likely that his top deputies and their lieutenants are largely responsible for coordinating the activities of the far-flung cells.’
    • ‘Certainly a number of his lieutenants and cohorts have been captured in recent months.’
    • ‘The lieutenant stood up to face his superior without fear and without respect.’
    • ‘It's as if his on-the-field lieutenant is exempt from being substituted, is exempt too from criticism.’
    • ‘He would delegate to his trusted lieutenants and then leave them alone to do their jobs.’
    • ‘But I regard you as a lieutenant available to assist as and when required.’
    deputy, second in command, right-hand man, right-hand woman, number two, assistant, aide, wingman, henchman, henchwoman, subordinate
    sidekick
    body man
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A rank of officer in the British army, above second lieutenant and below captain.
      • ‘Although they had lost a loyal lieutenant, the battle was not over.’
      • ‘They are scheduled to graduate from the Royal Military College as lieutenants in the Australian Army on Saturday June 22.’
      • ‘High academic rank brought Jackson assignment as a lieutenant in the 3rd US Artillery.’
      • ‘He was commissioned a second lieutenant through the Officer Candidate School program in 1969.’
      • ‘Mr Long, a former flight lieutenant, was based at RAF Lyneham from 1962 until 1994.’
      • ‘A lieutenant or staff sergeant can easily find themselves in charge of a $25,000 cash monthly field-ordering officer account.’
      • ‘Michael quickly rose through the ranks as orderly sergeant, first lieutenant and captain.’
      • ‘The young lieutenant later became Lord Roberts and commander-in-chief of the Indian army.’
      • ‘While at William and Mary in 1776, Monroe was commissioned an infantry lieutenant in the 3rd Virginia Regiment.’
      • ‘He served as a flight lieutenant in the Royal Air Force bomber command until 1947.’
      • ‘And the lieutenant was the leader of the platoon.’
      • ‘He was commissioned a second lieutenant upon graduation in 1972 from the U.S. Military Academy.’
      • ‘Joseph Tilly was a military man and became a lieutenant in the artillery.’
      • ‘There are paintings and photographs of generals, lieutenants, sergeants, privates, secretaries and commanders-in-chief.’
      • ‘The team, made up of one major, four captains, one lieutenant, one first sergeant, and three sergeants first class, began the arduous task of preparing the foreign soldiers for combat.’
      • ‘I served with outstanding female officers as an Army military police lieutenant and captain - officers who were equal or superior to me in every way.’
      • ‘Five years later, he was appointed a second lieutenant in the army's Topographical Engineers.’
      • ‘Are the results as crisp and orderly as when the colonel commands the lieutenant?’
      • ‘He was commissioned in mid-1944 and made flight lieutenant two years later.’
      • ‘The company commander thought the new lieutenant and staff sergeant were scapegoats for superior officers in their chain of command.’
    2. 1.2A rank of officer in the navy, above sub lieutenant and below lieutenant commander.
      • ‘He has commanded in every rank from lieutenant to vice admiral, and has flown his flag in all three of the Navy's aircraft carriers.’
      • ‘Who makes up and then runs current innovation efforts, lieutenants or admirals?’
      • ‘He was a Navy lieutenant who fought in real battles.’
      • ‘He served two tours as a lieutenant in the navy in Vietnam between December 1967 and April 1969, when he returned to the US with three Purple Hearts and a Silver Star.’
      • ‘He was a surgeon lieutenant in the navy and a major in the special forces for the sultan of Oman.’
      • ‘He reportedly invited a union official home to personally inspect his Silver Star, Bronze Star and three Purple Hearts, awarded for his combat duty as a Navy lieutenant.’
      • ‘As a lieutenant in the Navy, I put my letter of resignation in a year before the end of my commitment.’
      • ‘Sir James has commanded in every rank from lieutenant to vice-admiral.’
      • ‘Appointed first lieutenant in the Continental Navy in 1775, Jones received the command of the Ranger in 1777.’
      • ‘During the second world war he served in the Royal Navy as surgeon lieutenant, escorting convoys in the north Atlantic on HMS Maplin, a converted merchant ship which catapulted Hurricanes into combat.’
      • ‘Refusing exemption, he had joined the navy as a lieutenant and was about to take charge of the Admiralty's Educational Film Unit.’
      • ‘The two former military officers (Woodward served as a lieutenant in the Navy) have been amigos for more than a dozen years.’
      • ‘Nuclear propulsion pay will now be received by sub lieutenants and lieutenants at category A levels on completion of their engineer officer of the watch board.’
      • ‘As a Royal Navy lieutenant, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for navigating unchartered waters off the Burmese coast.’
      • ‘I was a naval gunfire officer in the Vietnam War - a Navy lieutenant serving in the 7th Marine Regiment.’
      • ‘A Navy lieutenant in France broadcasted information and live entertainment to troops accompanying President Wilson to the 1919 Paris Peace Conference.’
      • ‘In September 1945 I was a surgeon lieutenant in the Royal Navy in Ceylon when I was sent to Sumatra with a naval landing party to Belawan Deli, the port for Medan, the principal city in the northern part of the island.’
      • ‘Lieutenants were just lieutenants, without the division of sub-lieutenants, but their seniority was all-important, and taken from the Navy list.’
      • ‘Initially the Navy had only two ranks, lieutenant and captain; flag ranks were not established until the Civil War.’
      • ‘As a Navy lieutenant during World War II, he introduced to the U.S. Navy the importance of knowing how to swim.’
    3. 1.3(in the US) a police officer next in rank below captain.
      • ‘No one would question the sight of a military police lieutenant taking his gear from one place to another.’
      • ‘Back there he plays catch with his father, Mark, a police lieutenant in Carrollton, Texas.’
      • ‘After a portentous prologue, the film shifts five years ahead, showing him in his new position as lieutenant in the citizen police force.’
      • ‘On Tuesday I called the lieutenant in charge of the buy-back program for some more information.’
      • ‘The principal made a call to the police captain or lieutenant, and said, I've got a drug issue here.’
      • ‘A lot has been made of that fact, but he was putting the question to the police lieutenant this morning.’
      • ‘A volunteer Buffalo police lieutenant also lectured on awareness and how to avoid getting attacked.’
      • ‘I was strapped onto a backboard and placed on the front of a boat with an injured police lieutenant, a firefighter, and a few walking wounded.’
      • ‘As a Shawnee police department lieutenant explained to reporters, the transparent tape performed as advertised.’
      • ‘‘We're in a state of high alert,’ said one police lieutenant.’
      • ‘She is a 52-year-old retired D.C. police lieutenant and the oldest U.S. athlete on the team.’
      • ‘The task force leader, a sheriff's lieutenant, said the number of people vulnerable to identity theft in the case could reach 500,000.’
      • ‘The fire department lieutenant and the police supervisor led Eric to a parked cruiser, where they pumped him for information.’
      • ‘In a separate incident, guerrillas killed a police lieutenant in the same city.’
      • ‘According to the Independent, a police lieutenant declared at the hotel yesterday that he had stationed snipers around the building and would kill anyone who attempted to leave.’
      • ‘The police lieutenant who handled the case of our intruder called and informed me that the man who broke into our house was found dead in his jail cell.’
      • ‘She was eager to see the damage for herself, even though her husband, a police lieutenant, warned her how bad it was.’
      • ‘They had never expressed pride when I had graduated from the academy and been commissioned as a lieutenant.’
      • ‘Some of the great glories of science, including many who have adorned the non-physical sciences, have been as innocent of metaphysical theory as so many police lieutenants.’
      • ‘‘I only had a pistol with me,’ said a police lieutenant.’

Usage

In the normal British pronunciation of lieutenant the first syllable sounds like lef-. In the standard US pronunciation the first syllable, in contrast, rhymes with do. It is difficult to explain where the f in the British pronunciation comes from. Probably, at some point before the 19th century, the u at the end of Old French lieu was read and pronounced as a v, and the v later became an f

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French (see lieu, tenant).

Pronunciation:

lieutenant

/lɛfˈtɛnənt/