Definition of lie-in in English:

lie-in

noun

British
  • A prolonged stay in bed in the morning.

    ‘your mother is having a lie-in this morning’
    • ‘Because work is so readily available, we're beginning to take it for granted, so if it was a particularly demanding weekend, a lie-in on Monday morning won't do anyone any harm.’
    • ‘His wife Florence allowed him a rare lie-in this morning, after working late in the studio on material for their band.’
    • ‘With the Easter holidays just underway, school children are looking forward to two weeks of late morning lie-ins and afternoons spent hanging out with their friends.’
    • ‘And do all those thoughts evaporate during the traditional Saturday morning lie-in?’
    • ‘Today was lunch with Mum after a reasonable lie-in this morning.’
    • ‘I suppose it's just nice to have the time to myself to do with as I see fit and if this means a couple of lie-ins and dossing around the house, then that's fine with me.’
    • ‘Jack said: ‘I think that after all these early mornings I deserve a bit of a lie-in.’’
    • ‘You'd think that I'd be able to get a lie-in on a Saturday morning, wouldn't you?’
    • ‘I've had three years earning hardly any money, and long lie-ins are OK for a while but then they get pretty soul-destroying.’
    • ‘When she gets home, Jill is looking forward to a Sunday morning lie-in and a long brunch with plenty of Bloody Marys.’
    • ‘That night the three of us enjoyed a few beers at one of the area's few bars followed by a lie-in the next morning on our first ‘rest day’.’
    • ‘The baby classes have been stopped at our local pool, Govanhill in Glasgow, because it's earmarked for closure - but Sundays are the only mornings parents can get a lie-in.’
    • ‘He likes to have long lie-ins in the mornings, and is quite grumpy until he has his morning cup of coffee, which is usually early afternoons.’
    • ‘There's nothing like planning a nice, long lie-in on a Sunday morning, and then getting woken up by People With Children at 9am.’
    • ‘They had a lie-in on Sunday morning before driving to a local beauty spot where they had a picnic.’
    • ‘We've lost our lie-ins, which seems trivial but makes a big difference.’
    • ‘I arose late this morning, having had a marathon lie-in (for me), and emerged from the boudoir at 11: 56.’
    • ‘And so, while dear Pal was enjoying the final minutes of his rainy Saturday late morning lie-in, I've filled in the test.’
    • ‘On the first morning of their five-day break, the couple had a lie-in before joining other guests mid-morning to relax on the lawn of the resort.’
    • ‘As I sat supping beer after the rehearsal, sometime around 11 pm last night, I was working on the basis that I would have a nice lie-in the next morning, and it didn't matter if I had another pint.’

Pronunciation

lie-in

/ˈlʌɪɪn/