Definition of library in English:

library

noun

  • 1A building or room containing collections of books, periodicals, and sometimes films and recorded music for use or borrowing by the public or the members of an institution.

    ‘a university library’
    as modifier ‘a library book’
    • ‘Showmen would also tour schools, libraries and concert halls with the apparatus showing off the latest film slides.’
    • ‘In 1911 the collection was placed on view in a third-floor gallery at the new public library building at Forty-second Street.’
    • ‘This included various workshops and activities and visiting speakers were available to youngsters in the library and the school hall.’
    • ‘Further, we found a severe lack of Latino children's literature in the libraries and classrooms of schools in this study.’
    • ‘Children may not be able to return to a school in September after a £1m fire devastated four classrooms, a library and a hall.’
    • ‘He was led through the library, study rooms and multimedia centre.’
    • ‘A newspaper dating from 1867 was one of three items found in a glass bottle in the wall cavity between the school library and a classroom.’
    • ‘When I was a lad, all those years ago, I was an assistant to the Librarian at Queens' College, Cambridge, a post which gave me access to the inner sanctum of the library.’
    • ‘Each month 10 per cent of all book sales to library members goes back to the Richmond-Tweed Regional Library for the purchase of new books.’
    • ‘When interrupted or just merely looking up, common places like my bedroom, the library or my school gym are foreign to me.’
    • ‘It's easier to borrow the book from a public library or buy it from a second-hand bookshop.’
    • ‘Students are considering the energy sources in their own dorms, libraries and classrooms and then working to harness this buying power to create a clean energy revolution.’
    • ‘For sixty years the Geology Museum remained in the public library building.’
    • ‘Students in year three and four were given two days off, and are now back at the school using the library as a temporary classroom.’
    • ‘The students can then access the presentation at the school library at his/her convenience.’
    • ‘So you look at the overall campus and you look at lots and lots of rooms: libraries, dorm rooms, classrooms, cubicles and so forth.’
    • ‘So a university gets a new library building but no funds for new books.’
    • ‘By publicly borrowing library books, patrons forfeit any constitutional protections they may have had in their reading habits.’
    • ‘I researched sailboat building at our town library and Boston Public Library.’
    • ‘It was raining when I left home, heading to university to return my library book to stop the fine accruing at $3 a day.’
    1. 1.1 A collection of books and periodicals held in a library.
      ‘the Institute houses an outstanding library of 35,000 volumes on the fine arts’
      • ‘Many people who would not think of themselves as collectors amass considerable libraries in their lifetime.’
      • ‘It is not surprising then that the young Abdurrahman was encouraged to debate ideas and issues and to read widely in his father's extensive library.’
      • ‘Like family heirlooms, libraries and research collections gain luster with age and use.’
      • ‘A few Italian book collectors began to amass libraries of unprecedented proportions: one cardinal is said to have had as many as 15,000 books.’
      • ‘They visited the stables, admiring the horses, and settled in to read from the extensive library Geoff had collected.’
      • ‘This practical guide for pedagogy students and teachers is a welcome addition to our collective libraries.’
      • ‘Readers with deep pockets should feel free to purchase this W.B. Yeats second issue for my library.’
      • ‘I trust that you will find this issue a welcome addition to your library.’
      • ‘This volume belongs in all college and research libraries, and in scholars' professional collections.’
      • ‘Onboard, take advantage of the research library and expert naturalists.’
      • ‘The museum houses a library with about 60,000 books related to Gandhi and the various causes he espoused.’
      • ‘His annotated score, as well as a beautifully bound presentation copy signed by every member of the orchestra, is among the thousands of scores and sound recordings in the library.’
    2. 1.2 A room in a private house where books are kept.
      ‘there was a library that Uncle Hilbert used as his study’
      • ‘It had a dining room, spacious living room with a central fireplace, an impressive kitchen, a small breakfast room, a large library and a sitting room.’
      • ‘After adding on more casual spaces, he'll turn a little-used living room into a library, study, or game room.’
      • ‘Dominic's room was more like a hotel luxury suite complete with a living room and a private library.’
      • ‘The ground floor also features a library and dining room.’
      • ‘The floating glass divider turns up again to encapsulate a private library and two guest bedrooms.’
      • ‘The property includes eight bedrooms, a library, study, a conservatory, and two wine cellars.’
      • ‘There are two formal reception rooms on the ground floor, as well as a kitchen, breakfast room, library, study, conservatory and guest bathroom.’
      • ‘After the game room came the three guest rooms, the kitchen, the library, the informal living room and Rob's bedroom.’
      • ‘The bedrooms are linked to the bathrooms, dressing rooms, libraries and anterooms.’
      • ‘It is a single-family four-bedroom house, with a living room, dining room, library, kitchen, two bathrooms, yard and garage.’
      • ‘The house has two studies, a library, a 15 ft kitchen, dining room, family room, sitting room, drawing room and two bathrooms.’
      • ‘He was cordial and invited me to his small private drawing room and library.’
      • ‘The villa had running water, underfloor heating, bathing facilities, two libraries, a reception room and bedrooms surrounding an internal patio.’
      • ‘Downstairs there is a library, living room, terrace and a kitchen and dining area.’
      • ‘The castle has a panelled dining room, a library, a billiards room and a grand hall.’
      • ‘For the same money, you can buy a three-bedroom Greek beach house with a sitting room, library, fitted kitchen and bathroom.’
      • ‘The library and drawing room looked almost normal compared to the bizarre collection of marble busts, classical casts and ancient antiquities that covered the walls of the rooms behind.’
      • ‘It includes a library, kitchen, four main bedrooms, a dressing room, two bathrooms, three further attic bedrooms and a study.’
      • ‘Along the cool corridors are private dining rooms, libraries, a gymnasium, and Turkish baths.’
      • ‘You can use the kitchen, the library, the living room.’
      study, studio
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 A series of books or recordings issued by a company as a set.
      • ‘A Dutch publisher plans to release the complete series in a library of 12 hardcovers.’
    4. 1.4 A collection of films, recorded music, etc., organized systematically and kept for research or borrowing.
      ‘a record library’
      • ‘He left behind a much smaller library of recorded works than Sun Ra, but what a collection it is.’
      • ‘Experts analysing the anthrax used in the US attacks are comparing its DNA with a library of strains collected worldwide.’
      • ‘This is not a recording to build a library with, then.’
      • ‘‘He's simpatico with the culture and has a whole library of recorded sounds from that area,’ Karp said.’
      • ‘This includes photo libraries, research databases and detailed archives.’
      • ‘One may lament the absence of a libretto but the CD version will probably be in most collectors' libraries anyway.’
      • ‘The archive functions as a dance library and research center, much like the New York City Public Library's Dance Collection.’
      • ‘Start your library by researching other denominational hymnals.’
      • ‘Often, I've found, it's just the coincidental timing of first hearing and life events that have made them assume a special place in the recording library inside my head.’
    5. 1.5Computing A collection of programs and software packages made generally available, often loaded and stored on disk for immediate use.
      ‘download any of thousands of programs from our software libraries’
      • ‘All [customers] need to do is buy a camera, and the software library and toolkit do the analysis.’
      • ‘That said, backward-compatibility is a relatively new feature for consoles - for a long time, buying a next-generation machine meant leaving your software library behind.’
      • ‘He reckons it will take 18 months to get the 4,000 programs in the software library built, and has taken the CD off the market.’
      • ‘At under $20 per title, however, these are great recommendations for a family's home software library, as well as for a teacher's free-time area.’
      • ‘Update the software library to get rid of old software versions, beta versions and out of date service packs.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin libraria ‘bookshop’, feminine (used as a noun) of librarius ‘relating to books’, from liber, libr- ‘book’.

Pronunciation

library

/ˈlʌɪbri//ˈlʌɪbrəri/