Main definitions of ley in English

: ley1ley2

ley1

(also temporary ley)

noun

  • A piece of land put down to grass, clover, etc., for a single season or a limited number of years, in contrast to permanent pasture.

    • ‘The meadow, which until recently was a magnificent relic of ancient pasture, is now approaching the usual nitrogenous-fertiliser-fed ley so common anywhere.’
    • ‘The sheep and cattle all run together on swards, which are predominately white clover mixtures, and Howard told me that the mixed stocking and the highly nutritious clover leys have a big bearing on the way his livestock thrive.’
    • ‘If the land be ploughed out of ley once in ten or 12 years there is no danger of the seeds missing.’
    • ‘Housing, feeding and slurry facilities were already adequate, which freed up spare capital for reseeding fields with clover-rich leys.’
    • ‘The farm is down to clover leys for grazing and silage plus oats, wheat and beans for feeding out of parlour in a total mixed ration, with all cows receiving the same amount of feed.’

Origin

Old English lǣge ‘fallow’ (recorded in lǣghrycg ‘ridge left at the edge of a ploughed field’); related to lay and lie.

Pronunciation:

ley

/leɪ/

Main definitions of ley in English

: ley1ley2

ley2

(also ley line)

noun

  • A supposed straight line connecting three or more prehistoric or ancient sites, sometimes regarded as the line of a former track and associated by some with lines of energy and other paranormal phenomena.

    • ‘It was difficult to leave this place with the remembrance and the power of its deep ley lines.’
    • ‘This suggestion might be dismissed as abandoning scholarship in favour of the misty realms of ley lines and earnest unwashed New Ageism.’
    • ‘He locates ley lines, etc., and inserts carved granite ‘needles’ at particular points to enhance or redirect the flow of energy.’
    • ‘To me they are as mysterious and seemingly symbolic as Stonehenge, marking some unknown ley line along the mountains, silently turning, facing the wind.’
    • ‘The shop fronts were hunched beneath narrow buildings that hinted at a medieval past; today they house bookshops, with shelves full of guides to instant-dowsing, ley lines, runes and crystal healing.’
    • ‘Sometimes everybody's ley lines coincide, and it all comes together.’
    • ‘The ley lines are found most frequently in areas along the west coast.’
    • ‘‘It used to be known for ley lines more than anything but now I think it's known as much for its lattes,’ he said.’
    • ‘He believed that if he stood on a manhole cover in Liverpool's Matthew Street while his two groups played live on opposite sides of the world, the converging ley lines would fill him with a powerful life force.’
    • ‘Some are new-age mystics convinced that the Christian route to Santiago is just the latest version of a more ancient pathway linking ley line to ley line.’
    • ‘Up until about an hour ago I had been the only person I knew who even knew what a ley line was, let alone could actually use them, but the rule still applied.’
    • ‘The myths include the idea that Oxford Road is built on a ley line and so is believed by some to be an energy centre.’
    • ‘Our only feeling on that is that there are proven psycho-magnetic ley lines which criss-cross the country, and it is suggested that ghosts can use these as we use roads.’

Origin

1920s: variant of lea.

Pronunciation:

ley

/leɪ/