Definition of lethargy in English:

lethargy

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A lack of energy and enthusiasm.

    ‘there was an air of lethargy about him’
    • ‘The first half was marked by total lethargy and an almost complete lack of chances.’
    • ‘There is a tendency towards slouching rather than an upright composure and overall there may be a sense of lethargy or a lack of vitality.’
    • ‘In spite of the general lethargy of teenagers, surveys show that most adolescents would like to be fitter.’
    • ‘The end result is a state of lethargy interspaced with bursts of frantic energy.’
    • ‘During the day, if heating is set too high, it can induce lethargy, poor concentration and fatigue.’
    • ‘Running on pure nervous energy, he was caught in the temporary lethargy that comes after great effort.’
    • ‘A large meal before or during a flight will cause lethargy making it more difficult to cope with jet lag.’
    • ‘A good breakfast is important for refilling our energy stores, keeping lethargy at bay during the morning hours.’
    • ‘He was particularly upset with police lethargy and lack of enough vehicles for night patrolling.’
    • ‘The heat was swelling as the morning ticked on, filling the air with lethargy.’
    • ‘I'm getting a little concerned with my total lethargy.’
    • ‘However, today may be slow on the updates - there's a distinct air of lethargy about the place.’
    • ‘Feelings of lethargy and fatigue are creeping into my being.’
    • ‘The chorus has that air of resigned lethargy and torpor which regularly lowers over those with little or no hope.’
    • ‘Better marketing techniques could help in overcoming this lethargy, and creating a bigger market, they point out.’
    • ‘Even worse, only a few people had picked it up, and when I shook off daylight savings lethargy at 1pm to get a copy, the display stand was still full.’
    • ‘I have sudden surges of energy and productivity, or lethargy and napping.’
    • ‘Pardon my lethargy and lack of imagination as I continue my romp through our holiday snaps.’
    • ‘Thankfully, I should soon be reaching the stage when the nausea and lethargy subside and I gain a bit more energy.’
    • ‘A typical Scottish fry-up will send them back into sluggish lethargy.’
    sluggishness, inertia, inactivity, inaction, slowness, torpor, torpidity, lifelessness, dullness, listlessness, languor, languidness, stagnation, laziness, idleness, indolence, shiftlessness, sloth, phlegm, apathy, passivity, ennui, weariness, tiredness, lassitude, fatigue, sleepiness, drowsiness, enervation, somnolence, narcosis
    hebetude
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Medicine
      A pathological state of sleepiness or deep unresponsiveness and inactivity.
      ‘a history of weight loss, lethargy, and fluid retention’
      • ‘Symptoms include vomiting, lethargy and frequently coma.’
      • ‘Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, lethargy and indifference.’
      • ‘Monitor for clinical symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, lethargy, edema, jaundice, and seizure breakthrough.’
      • ‘Some of the other side effects of the strong pain medications include confusion, lethargy and sleepiness.’
      • ‘Symptoms include lethargy and disorientation, as well as life-threatening seizures and respiratory distress.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from late Latin lethargia, from Greek lēthargia, from lēthargos forgetful, from the base of lanthanesthai forget.

Pronunciation:

lethargy

/ˈlɛθədʒi/