Definition of lend in English:

lend

verb

  • 1with two objects Grant to (someone) the use of (something) on the understanding that it will be returned.

    ‘Stewart asked me to lend him my car’
    ‘the pictures were lent to each museum in turn’
    • ‘He told me that a relative had offered to lend him a car while he is here.’
    • ‘Hannah lent me a sleeping bag since I didn't take one and I managed to find space in a room with a carpet to sleep.’
    • ‘I was doubly shamed, as mine contained little more than a notebook, a camera, a sleeping bag they had lent me, and some lint.’
    • ‘She took off the jacket Jay lent her and returned it to him.’
    • ‘Bill lent me a copy of his latest book and I have to tell you I laughed until I cried reading this book.’
    • ‘Luckily I was still pretty smart and someone lent me a tie.’
    • ‘We give them what they want and in return they lend us what we want.’
    • ‘When Virginia goes to England, she lends me her car: a Peugeot convertible with English plates.’
    • ‘You don't have to depend on your parents lending you the car.’
    • ‘She lent me her cellphone so I could make calls to arrange this.’
    • ‘I thought I'd just give you back those albums you lent me.’
    • ‘A policeman took time from directing operations to lend me his car and mobile phone to collect my mind and phone work colleagues.’
    • ‘She told a tale of woe that involved her ex-boyfriend Kevin using guilt to convince her to lend him her car.’
    • ‘When I arrived, I was lent a small cap; my hat would have been conspicuously different.’
    • ‘Uncle offers to give me one car, and lend me another.’
    • ‘One of my managers at work has lent me his camera to play with.’
    • ‘He convinced Brian to lend him his car and Romeo drove back to Juliet's house.’
    • ‘The point here is that I lent you something and you've broken it.’
    • ‘Jouko had lent me his photographic field guide for the weekend, and I quickly determined that the bird was a Spangled Drongo.’
    • ‘By 2002, she was living with Tim Montgomery, a relationship which began after she had lost her spikes in Oslo and he lent her his.’
    loan, give someone the loan of, let someone use, let someone have the use of
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    1. 1.1 Allow (a person or organization) the use of (a sum of money) under an agreement to pay it back later, typically with interest.
      ‘no one would lend him the money’
      no object ‘banks lend only to their current account customers’
      ‘balance sheets weakened by unwise lending’
      • ‘With only Rp 2 million in his hand, some of which his brother lent him, he decided to try his luck in the capital.’
      • ‘So why are banks falling all over themselves to lend small businesses money?’
      • ‘The state-owned bank lent the money to a company called Harvard Properties whose directors are Dan McGing and Barry Kenny.’
      • ‘He claimed Sattar had agreed to lend him the money, which he needed for personal reasons.’
      • ‘It's security the bank requires when lending you money, explained the banker.’
      • ‘My parents have also lent me some money, which I will eventually have to pay back.’
      • ‘A homeless teacher has been jailed after he stole cash from a kind-hearted charity boss who lent him money and gave him a job.’
      • ‘Liu was not at home and his parents refused to lend him the money.’
      • ‘Banks would be more inclined to lend him money to improve the site, he said.’
      • ‘And how willing will our bank be to lend us money to invest in assets other than property?’
      • ‘When a bank lends you money, the loan comes with strings attached - namely, the covenants contained in the loan agreement.’
      • ‘So he persuaded a bank to lend him the money to buy a chain of newsagents.’
      • ‘Although they could justify the expense, they knew no bank would lend them any more money.’
      • ‘On a few occasions Mrs Slater had lent him small sums.’
      • ‘It should come as no surprise that banks and other lending institutions are in business to make money.’
      • ‘The bad news comes at a time when banks have lent more money than ever to consumers with poor credit.’
      • ‘Bank of Ireland is prepared to lend staff up to double their salaries to buy Telecom Eireann shares.’
      • ‘They're lending the American government money in exchange for interest.’
      • ‘I give over $600 a month to the nice people who lent me the money to go to business school.’
      • ‘Bertie doesn't have that sort of cash, but as his brother lent him money for Christmas, he'll probably help him out again.’
      advance, give credit, credit, allow
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  • 2with two objects Contribute or add (a quality) to.

    ‘the smile lent his face a boyish charm’
    • ‘It lent this marvelous weight to the central questions of the film, ‘Who am I?’’
    • ‘This lends weight to the theory that autism is a neurodevelopmental condition and not an acquired one.’
    • ‘To lend weight to this, he adds the interpretation of a social scientist and an academician.’
    • ‘Mr Hughes-Wilson's views lend weight to the words of George Bernard Shaw.’
    • ‘Perhaps that lent an extra measure of contrast to the rowdy group at the back of the smoking section.’
    • ‘This paradoxical blend of the practical and the unworldly lends depth and texture to his best work, but it was a volatile mix and didn't always work.’
    • ‘Perhaps he felt it lent a bit of dignity to the affair.’
    • ‘Browning is to be praised for his monumental research project; his analysis of the major characters lends a depth to the work.’
    • ‘A 1997 Yorkshire study of 255 adolescent students' attitudes to reading lends weight to this view.’
    • ‘Another consideration lends weight to this prospect.’
    • ‘Lee Ermey, a former drill sergeant himself, lends a good dose of realism to his role as the evil instructor.’
    • ‘Also, the article lends a bit of credibility to my presentations when I speak to families on dietary, biomedical, and other types of therapies.’
    • ‘When fire fighters arrive to find flames jumping up the outside of the building it is obvious that they too should lend their weight to student concerns.’
    • ‘Its higher price, $262, lends weight to that assumption.’
    • ‘Roland is always cited as a ‘former NASA historian,’ which supposedly lends weight to his comments.’
    • ‘The concentration of structures in space lends an urban quality even to small villages.’
    • ‘However, some commentators argue that new material in the Strasbourg papyrus lends weight to the traditional interpretation.’
    • ‘His British accent lends a singsong quality to the words.’
    • ‘Further weight was lent to that argument in the 2004 Six Nations championship, the first after Johnson's retirement.’
    • ‘Because this exchange pitted him against the president, it lent stature to the senator's candidacy.’
    add, impart, give, bestow, confer, provide, grant, supply, furnish, accord, offer, contribute, afford, bring, donate
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  • 3lend itself towith two objects Accommodate or adapt oneself to.

    ‘John stiffly lent himself to her aromatic embraces’
    • ‘First of all, there were people in this community who lent themselves to that kind of description through their very overt, shameless manipulation of this story to advance their own political careers.’
    • ‘He lent himself to an illusion, he lent himself to misleading the African people.’
    • ‘They're not guys who lend themselves to humor because they're so dull.’
    • ‘The actor has been lending himself to book launches recently, starting with Vikram Seth's Two Lives way back in October.’
    • ‘Judge James Pyke told him: ‘I have listened to the circumstances in which you came to be involved in this, but the fact remains that you lent yourself to an evil trade.’’
    • ‘He was joined by a great contingent of the local faithful and laity, all generously lending themselves to this historic afternoon in Loughglynn.’
    • ‘There are some who will observe the period, but it is not something that we lend ourselves to.’
    • ‘And he was correct to point out that prosecutors lend themselves to being used for political purposes.’
    • ‘Perhaps soldiers patrolling in camouflage gear don't lend themselves to debauchery in the French Quarter.’
    • ‘‘By working at Aldermaston,’ he realises, ‘he has lent himself to evil.’’
    1. 3.1lend itself to (of a thing) be suitable for.
      ‘bay windows lend themselves to blinds’
      • ‘I've got the first one, and the stories really lend themselves to the comic format.’
      • ‘There are several good works in Indian languages published each year which lend themselves to ideal scripts for films.’
      • ‘Lewis's estate was impressed with the way Belvedere's native features lend themselves to the fictional landscape.’
      • ‘Pots lend themselves to the cultivation of annuals and throughout the year they can accommodate a changing display of flowers.’
      • ‘We all know Greater London is short of residential property and many Workspace sites would lend themselves to mixed-use developments.’
      • ‘The countries of North Africa tend to be treated as a whole but do not, in any practical sense, lend themselves to such categorisation.’
      • ‘The animal paintings would lend themselves to greeting card design whereas the flowers would suit repeat patterns such as wrapping paper.’
      • ‘The plastic blocks are lighter, lending themselves to more applications, and easier to install.’
      • ‘Some books make good films, some shops lend themselves to mail-order.’
      • ‘On the other hand my books don't lend themselves to movies and they tend to violate basic laws of fiction writing.’
      be suitable for, be suited to, be appropriate for, be adaptable to, have the right characteristics for, be applicable for, be easily used for, be readily used for, be serviceable for
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Usage

Reciprocal pairs of words such as lend and borrow (or teach and learn) are often confused. Common uses in informal speech in a number of British dialects include can I lend your pen? (correct standard use is can I borrow your pen?). There is no noun lend in standard English, where loan is the correct word to use. However, it is used informally in a number of dialects and varieties, including Scottish, Northern Irish, and northern English, as in, for example, can I have a lend of your pen?

Phrases

  • lend an ear (or one's ears)

    • Listen sympathetically or attentively.

      ‘the Samaritans lend their ears to those in crisis’
      • ‘But for some semblance of camaraderie, lend an ear to their tales of woe.’
      • ‘He wanted to lend an ear but this wasn't part of the bargain.’
      • ‘Whenever I needed to talk about Aaron, which I admit was often, he always lent an ear.’
      • ‘If you need any help getting started, I would be happy to lend an ear or a hand.’
      • ‘‘I killed my son, and my wife's leaving me’ he sobs at regular intervals to anyone that will lend an ear.’
      • ‘Besides, a true friend is always ready to lend an ear when a person is under too much stress to handle.’
      • ‘Let her know that you don't necessarily expect her to fix everything for you - you just want her to lend an ear.’
      • ‘The others in the group generally lend their ears, some slurping steaming hot tea from squat hexagonal glasses.’
      • ‘They lend an ear, they share words of praise and they always want to open their hearts to us.’
      • ‘The two sitting Conservative Ward Councillors work very hard on local issues and are always ready to lend an ear or a helping hand.’
      listen, keep one's ears open, prick up one's ears
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  • lend one's name to

    • Allow oneself to be publicly associated with.

      ‘he lent his name and prestige to the project’
      • ‘Footballer and style icon David Beckham was not only conveniently seen buying some for his wife Victoria last Christmas but also lent his name to its children's range of clothing.’
      • ‘Polgar, a Hungarian native who lent her name to the center, will evaluate Georgia's strategies and techniques, DeLeon said.’
      • ‘While I may not want a war in my name, there are quite a few other causes I don't want to lend my name to either.’
      • ‘In the ensuing outcry, Chomsky lent his name to a letter praising Johnstone's ‘outstanding work’.’
      • ‘He traveled often and far, lectured, taught, lent his name to social causes and to institutions.’
      • ‘His brother, James, accepted Clarks had bought the rights to the name but said he was ‘delighted’ to lend his name to the campaign.’
      • ‘I'm surprised you're lending your name to such a cruel suppression of dissent, Stephen.’
      • ‘The AC Milan footballer has lent his name to Riordan's apartment and villa complex, which will be known as Costa de Cabanas.’
      • ‘So convinced is Sadie Frost of Joshi's philosophy that she has lent her name to his Feel Great range.’
      • ‘After filmmaker Gus Van Sant also lent his name to the project, it was selected for the 2004 Sundance Film Festival, where the word spread.’
      sponsor, finance, put up the money for, fund, subsidize, underwrite, promote, lend one's name to, be a patron of, act as guarantor of, support
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Origin

Old English lǣnan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch lenen, also to loan. The addition of the final -d in late Middle English was due to association with verbs such as bend and send.

Pronunciation

lend

/lɛnd/