Main definitions of league in English

: league1league2

league1

noun

  • 1A collection of people, countries, or groups that combine for mutual protection or cooperation.

    ‘the League of Nations’
    • ‘The league has also been giving hands-on business advice and brokering to many organisations assisting with small business.’
    • ‘In the Po Valley, with its large capitalist farms, socialist leagues finally managed in early 1920 to win a monopoly control of the hiring of labour.’
    • ‘The league has taken the government to court over the fact that children were not being protected from bullying, assault and self-harm.’
    • ‘The league says this failure means up to 3,000 teenagers are locked up in inhumane, appalling conditions.’
    • ‘This led to a split, and the expulsion of the socialist students league, despite the temerity of this organisation.’
    • ‘In the 1930s the French fascist leagues marched to the same spot.’
    • ‘When the Constitution was submitted to referendum, short-lived federation leagues were formed in many centres to campaign for a ‘yes’ vote.’
    • ‘He was so pleased with his efforts that he described the league as ‘all our work’.’
    • ‘To this day Sweden, with the other Scandinavian countries, tops the league of percentage state spending on overseas aid.’
    • ‘The executive disaffiliated the league, which dissolved itself at its Whitsun conference.’
    • ‘The league is a small extremist group.’
    • ‘Britain is supposed to be high in the league of energy-saving policy-making.’
    • ‘Topics included Confederate nationalism, Civil War union leagues, and religion in the Civil War, respectively.’
    • ‘He was a founder member of the Warburton Youth League and was the league's president up until his death.’
    • ‘The league has already blown its £2,500 budget for emergency clothing on basics like underwear and pyjamas.’
    • ‘Finally, the league inaugurated the idea of collective economic sanctions.’
    • ‘The borough currently tops the country's league for the collection of paper, cans and plastic bottles.’
    • ‘Chambers of commerce and boards of trade are organizations of the same general type as business leagues.’
    • ‘What behaviours are open to or legitimate for nations / leagues of nations that wish to change the potentially dangerous conduct of their neighbors?’
    • ‘Karl Marx might approve of the league's socialist ethic: from each according to their abilities, to each according to their needs.’
    alliance, confederation, confederacy, federation, union, association, coalition, combine, consortium, affiliation, guild, corporation, conglomerate, cooperative, partnership, fellowship, syndicate, compact, band, group, circle, ring
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic An agreement or alliance.
      • ‘This is about the integrity of a league and an agreement: A deal is a deal.’
  • 2A group of sports clubs which play each other over a period for a championship.

    ‘the leading goalscorer in the league’
    as modifier ‘the league championship’
    • ‘He is the league's top scorer and also a fan favorite.’
    • ‘Players in the Premiership are playing in that league for a reason and that goes for players in Divisions One, Two and Three.’
    • ‘They also both manage teams in the same online fantasy basketball league.’
    • ‘How do I win my fantasy football league?’
    • ‘He has to be on the short list of league MVP candidates so far.’
    • ‘When will we again see a winning streak like Arsenal managed in the English premier football league?’
    • ‘Through June 27, he was hitting.342 and leading the major leagues in runs batted in with 76.’
    • ‘It made sense, of course, since the hockey league he played for was beginning their Christmas break.’
    • ‘The cloud is kicked up from so many teams scrambling for the league championship.’
    • ‘BBC Scotland today announced details of upcoming live Premier league fixtures.’
    • ‘The chances of making it into the premier league are probably better.’
    • ‘Minor football leagues commence April 6 and the minor football championship starts on July 15.’
    • ‘In this novel a 56-year-old bachelor plays out a baseball league he has invented using a variety of numerical charts and the roll of three dice.’
    • ‘The Grizzlies started a big youth league in British Columbia when they were there.’
    • ‘The minors will be starting their summer County league on Friday, July 9.’
    • ‘The Championship is one of the most competitive leagues in the world with every club capable of beating each other.’
    • ‘We want both; we don't want a more competitive league at a lower quality level.’
    • ‘There's a full programme of football scheduled, with cup and league matches.’
    • ‘Do kids even go outside in the summer anymore except to play in soccer leagues their parents make them join?’
    • ‘Jacob is among the league's top scorers with 9 goals from 12 matches.’
    championship, competition, contest
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The contest for the championship of a league.
      ‘the year we won the league’
      • ‘Fair enough, they've had a couple of good results, but winning the Champions league?’
      • ‘Run over three nights, the league was keenly contested with the outcome in doubt to the very end.’
      • ‘We won the league, FA Cup, Charity Shield and European Cup-Winners' Cup.’
      • ‘At West Ham we came within a couple of games of winning the league in 1986.’
      • ‘Winning the league four consecutive times is a great achievement.’
      • ‘We have got the home games in the bag to come but in our eyes we want to win the next four games and win the league.’
      • ‘His performance in the league, which he won without dropping a frame, led to his being re-seeded number one.’
      • ‘Chelsea has won the English league for the first time in 50 years, and many in England have been grumbling about the achievement.’
      • ‘Here's to raising the bar for every football team that contests the league in this country any time in the future.’
      • ‘At this moment it is easier to win the league than the Champions League or even the FA Cup.’
      • ‘For a while, all I thought about as a Manchester United supporter was when we'd end the drought and win the league.’
      • ‘They have the opportunity to show they are the real deal, that with some quality additions they can make progress and make it an even closer contest for the league next year.’
      • ‘They aren't suddenly going to win the league but at long last there seems to be a proper plan in place that might one day allow them to do so.’
      • ‘When you lose six matches at home you don't deserve to win the league.’
      • ‘The kids won their leagues as 7th and 8th graders, thanks to their talent and camaraderie.’
      • ‘Twice they won the league and twice lost in the play-offs that guaranteed promotion.’
      • ‘They have experience and know how to win and lose leagues so they will be capable of winning the league.’
      • ‘The final of the league was hotly contested.’
      • ‘We had won the league with five games to go and people were talking about a crisis.’
      • ‘People these days won't appreciate it but for many years after that United were the underdogs, until we finally won the league in 1993.’
    2. 2.2
      short for rugby league
      • ‘There are several sports which involve spinal risk, including horse riding and football, especially rugby union and league.’
      • ‘Fourteen men a side is not rugby union, nor league, and certainly not cricket, and the sooner they learn that the better for the dignity of the game and future tourists.’
      • ‘Which nation is the only one which can consistently stand up to New Zealand at rugby union and league?’
      • ‘Robinson's success has sparked a rash of worthy articles in the Australian press, all dealing with the supposed impact of league upon British rugby union.’
  • 3A class or category of quality or excellence.

    ‘the two men were not in the same league’
    ‘Austin's in a league of his own’
    • ‘As rousing, stirring words go, community is not in the same league as ‘freedom’ or ‘liberty’.’
    • ‘And what exactly gave you the impression that great guy is so totally out of your league?’
    • ‘It appears to be in a different league from other buildings which have been converted into cavernous licensed premises.’
    • ‘In a league of her own, the savvy businesswoman is a self-made franchise.’
    • ‘So, have you ever had a crush on someone a little out of your league?’
    • ‘She's out of her league, according to the class consciousness of the time.’
    • ‘In the ‘after’ photo they are all smiley and bright-eyed, their life changed forever; no one is out of their league now.’
    • ‘‘It's extremely crude and not in the same league as the original,’ the designer sniffed.’
    • ‘The story isn't quite in that league but the execution is impeccable.’
    • ‘When Chris carried his display into the regional fair in Fort Worth last month, he knew immediately that he was out of his league.’
    • ‘I loved the latter dearly, but everybody just knew - the two teams were not in the same league.’
    • ‘We were totally out of our league, however, in the fine wines category and after the questions on Chinese dynasties we were in last place.’
    • ‘As a songwriter, he is in a league of his own and is surely among the best writers this country has produced over the last three decades.’
    • ‘However, it is not in the same league as countries such as Canada.’
    • ‘Cynicism aside, she's way out of his league.’
    • ‘A quid box of fireworks was way out of our league.’
    • ‘So, if funding both in the UK and abroad seems out of your league, a quick blast with this book could change your outlook and prospects for the future.’
    • ‘I was recently hired at a company that seems to be way out of my league.’
    • ‘He's utterly out of my league, so that makes it easier to say that.’
    • ‘When it comes to pulling political strokes, they are a class act, in a league of their own.’
    class, group, category, ability group, level of ability, level
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verb

[no object]
  • Join in a league or alliance.

    ‘Oscar had leagued with other construction firms’
    • ‘And since then it has been leagued with various investigations into the historical Jesus.’
    • ‘His policies of appeasement leagued him frequently with the prudent Phocion.’
    • ‘The marquess of Montrose, initially a Covenanter, leagued with the Irish to invade in the north-west and with Alasdair MacColla turned a feud between the Scots-Irish MacDonalds and Argyll's Campbells into a powerful threat.’
    ally, join forces, join together, unite, form an association, band together, affiliate, combine, amalgamate, form a federation, confederate, collaborate, team up, join up
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • in league

    • Conspiring with another or others.

      ‘he is in league with the devil’
      • ‘However, when he was away from home, she hastened to accuse him of being in league with the devil.’
      • ‘Moreover, in Jacobean drama calculation and cynicism are typically coded as daemonic and intrigue is in league with Evil.’
      • ‘In some countries, terrorist groups were in league with national governments.’
      • ‘Intriguingly for those who recognize him, the part has him in league with his uncles in the White House.’
      • ‘In more refined versions, the American government is in league with the aliens and is assisting them in their abduction programme.’
      • ‘A teenage dad who stole tens of thousands of pounds worth of quad bikes while in league with travellers has walked free from court.’
      • ‘We know that all the forces that oppose us are in league with each other.’
      • ‘There's no doubt he can still sing, but now we know he isn't actually in league with the Devil, that's not enough anymore.’
      • ‘The death metallers, of course, come across not so much as being in league with Odin, as they'd like to think, as being a group of bullies.’
      • ‘If you think this puts me in league with the demons, why, you know what to do.’
      collaborating with, cooperating with, in cooperation with, in alliance with, allied with, conspiring with, leagued with, linked with, hand in glove with, in collusion with
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a compact for mutual protection or advantage): via French from Italian lega, from legare ‘to bind’, from Latin ligare.

Pronunciation

league

/liːɡ/

Main definitions of league in English

: league1league2

league2

noun

  • A former measure of distance by land, usually about three miles.

    • ‘She was not permitted to travel more than two leagues (five miles) from Coppet and began to receive word that orders for her arrest were pending.’
    • ‘He then flung it across the gap; it briefly illuminated the other side, a full twenty leagues away.’
    • ‘We eased our way through the crowd and into the park which after only a few paces seemed many leagues distant from the City surrounding it.’
    • ‘That's twenty-four leagues North-east to here.’
    • ‘By any basic living-standard or quality-of-life measurement, it is leagues ahead of most developing nations.’
    • ‘The tunnel measured ten leagues east to west, and it covered that distance in an arrow-straight line.’
    • ‘The result is an economy leagues ahead in the production and utilization of information technology.’
    • ‘Between the outer wall and the city are four leagues of land filled with farms, orchards and houses.’
    • ‘Methinks we have two leagues to go, so let us put some miles between us and here ere we sleep.’
    • ‘It was set on a rise amidst an almost flat plain of land that seemed to stretch for leagues to the north.’
    • ‘I receive a letter, which, upon opening it, I perceive by the handwriting and subscription to have come from a friend, who says he is two hundred leagues distant.’
    • ‘A league was three standard miles, so fifty leagues was one hundred fifty miles.’
    • ‘In 1803 Napoleon exiled her to twenty leagues, roughly fifty miles, from Paris.’
    • ‘There may very well not have been any such series; for example, it is not very likely that Hume had ever actually witnessed the continuous movement of a letter over a distance of two hundred leagues.’
    • ‘If she could not do anything to help here, what could she possibly do from a vantage point thousands of leagues distant?’

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin leuga, leuca, late Greek leugē, or from Provençal lega ( modern French lieue).

Pronunciation

league

/liːɡ/