Definition of laudable in English:



  • (of an action, idea, or aim) deserving praise and commendation.

    ‘laudable though the aim might be, the results have been criticized’
    • ‘It is a laudable impulse to try to increase your understanding of voters in other parts of the country.’
    • ‘The move was a serious blow to the government's laudable aim of achieving full employment.’
    • ‘Our council's proposal to target secondary schools, while laudable, is catching them too late.’
    • ‘Both are laudable aims, and both may be partially realized in the course of psychoanalysis.’
    • ‘The goal to attack the spiralling cost of public services may be laudable, but the precedent is dangerous.’
    • ‘Senior officers in the transport department agree that Minister's intention may be laudable.’
    • ‘The proposal to give tax exemption on the pension received by ex-servicemen and their kin is laudable.’
    • ‘Most farmers would agree that was a laudable aim, but many doubt that the ministry has the will or the wherewithal to bring it about.’
    • ‘The report said it had a laudable aim and created skilled jobs - but was not open to proper public scrutiny.’
    • ‘Nowadays a reasonable degree of certainty for third parties is not merely a laudable aim, it is a mandatory requirement of the law.’
    • ‘But it was no less laudable for that.’
    • ‘As such, he doesn't explain the essential mystery here - how modest funding for a laudable goal could have become such a punishing liability.’
    • ‘Enabling the internet's full potential to be used by the world's entire population is indeed laudable.’
    • ‘Obviously, it's a laudable aim, but it is oddly catholic in its objectives.’
    • ‘The author's use of lots of prose to explain key ideas, concepts and theories is laudable.’
    • ‘Her commitment is laudable but she does not have the credentials needed for her new position.’
    • ‘This landmark and laudable legislative step would go a long way in women empowerment and gender equality.’
    • ‘It is a very laudable approach, that is, if we are serious about dealing with the issue of drunk driving.’
    • ‘Focusing on the long term is also laudable in itself - especially in the light of what we've seen lately.’
    • ‘Perfection is a laudable aim in sport but rarely, if ever, is it attainable.’
    praiseworthy, commendable, admirable, meritorious, worthy, deserving, creditable, worthy of admiration, estimable, of note, noteworthy, exemplary, reputable, honourable, excellent, sterling
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Late Middle English: from Latin laudabilis, from laus, laud- praise.