Definition of lass in English:



Northern english, Scottish
  • A girl or young woman.

    ‘he married a lass from Yorkshire’
    ‘village lasses’
    • ‘The sight of a young lass flashing a bit of leg or a bit of cleavage can render most teenage lads incapable of concentrating on anything else.’
    • ‘Once more it is a superb showcase for the lads and lasses of Green Door.’
    • ‘Shelma's a young lass from, well, I'm not sure where she's from, but she sings like an angel.’
    • ‘‘They are, in the main, decent lads and lasses and it's the minority which let the majority down,’ he said.’
    • ‘That is the scale of your opportunity, lads and lasses.’
    • ‘Just to prove you can't keep a good hack down, the lads and lasses of the press have been chiselling away at the stars, seeking the real exclusives.’
    • ‘These two Celtic nations had not faced each other on a football pitch for nearly 20 years, so it was a perfect opportunity for the lads and lasses to show the boys from the valleys their full regalia.’
    • ‘I did hear a young lass make an ado about knowing where we lived, and coming to see us.’
    • ‘The lads and lasses were bid for like cattle and a good lass made £10 for the hiring (six months) and £12 for the lad.’
    • ‘I know that there is some stiff competition in the house and I will have to be at my most erudite and witty best to get one over on some of these lads and lasses I will be entombed with.’
    • ‘By contrast, the audience was split almost evenly between lads and lasses, and from a wider range of ethnic backgrounds than would be seen in an average office in Edinburgh or Glasgow.’
    • ‘Working with an all-male cast (the bouncers play the lads and lasses too), Hannah has brought a female perspective to the production.’
    • ‘When we learned that the lads and lasses who had looked after us so well were away in the Gulf, we wanted to show them how much we care and wish them well.’
    • ‘Compare that to a young lass who did work experience with us a few months ago.’
    • ‘When I was about 6 months pregnant I met a young lass at our local mother and baby group.’
    • ‘Was Shakespeare right when he said: all ‘golden lads and lasses must, like chimney sweepers, come to dust’?’
    • ‘From now on, I will refer to stable staff not as lads or lasses, but as grooms, in recognition of the trade that they practice, which demands skill and commitment.’
    • ‘On my first day of travelling to school on the bus, I was at the back along with some friends, when a young lass got on.’
    • ‘We get so many letters saying how much it means, it would be a big blow for the lads and lasses out there.’
    • ‘Now, though, all the young lasses can clump the ball and everyone knows that the sisters are there for the beating.’
    girl, young woman, young lady
    schoolgirl, miss
    chick, girlie, filly
    bird, bint, popsy
    dame, babe, doll, gal, broad, patootie, tomato
    baggage, piece, bit, tart
    maid, maiden, damsel
    View synonyms


Middle English: based on Old Norse laskura (feminine adjective) unmarried.