Main definitions of knap in English

: knap1knap2

knap1

noun

archaic
  • The crest of a hill.

    ‘a pathway winding around the knap of a green hill’

Origin

Old English cnæpp, cnæp.

Pronunciation

knap

/nap/

Main definitions of knap in English

: knap1knap2

knap2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Architecture Archaeology
  • 1Shape (a piece of stone, typically flint) by striking it, so as to make a tool or weapon or a flat-faced stone for building walls.

    ‘buildings made of knapped flint’
    • ‘Large numbers of Mesolithic stone tools and weapon points were found, with toolmaking waste to show that some tools were knapped, retouched and repaired on site.’
    • ‘The history of the knife is an intriguing one dating hack to simple flint tools knapped by prehistoric man.’
    • ‘By around 5,000 BC a focus had developed at the confluence of the Nene and a small tributary, where people stopped to light fires, knap flint, and perform domestic tasks.’
    • ‘Several of the men show great dexterity in shaping stones into implements, a process known as stone or flint knapping.’
    • ‘As soon as you come near to the South Downs, you get into the chalk lands, and all the older buildings begin to have knapped flints in them.’
    • ‘There is good flint for making tools; the abundant debris confirms that handaxes were regularly knapped there.’
    1. 1.1archaic Strike with a hard short sound; knock.

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘to knock, rap’): imitative; compare with Dutch and German knappen ‘crack, crackle’.

Pronunciation

knap

/nap/