Definition of knack in English:

knack

noun

  • 1[usually in singular] An acquired or natural skill at doing something.

    ‘he had a knack for communicating’
    • ‘During this campaign he displayed one of his greatest skills, the knack of surrounding himself with the right people.’
    • ‘Her voice is immensely beautiful and can lift you out of a blue mood, but more importantly, she has the knack of making you empathize with her subject matter.’
    • ‘He also has the rare knack for getting the players around him to lift their game.’
    • ‘My father had a knack for making a total stranger feel very comfortable in his presence.’
    • ‘Postle has a knack for combining slapstick comedy and pathos, which is very effective in this instance.’
    • ‘Conducting is a special knack and I discovered that I possessed it.’
    • ‘However, it's also difficult and time-consuming, and it takes a special knack which few scientists have.’
    • ‘She had a knack for teaching people how to enjoy the simple things in life.’
    • ‘The actor Ian Ogilvy's debut novel shows that he has a knack for writing for children.’
    • ‘He found work as a freelance consultant for engineering companies and soon discovered he had a knack for it.’
    • ‘The band certainly have a knack for writing melodies that seem like newly discovered classics.’
    • ‘Moreover, he's got a happy knack of presenting complex ideas in an accessible, engaging and entertaining way.’
    • ‘He had always had an uncanny knack for seeing things before they actually happened.’
    • ‘He has a real knack for picking projects that are a little off the beaten track, but guaranteed to be interesting.’
    • ‘To say that he has a knack for being at the right place at the right time would be an understatement.’
    • ‘And he proved that he hadn't lost his knack for charming his audience.’
    • ‘What sets him apart is his knack for storytelling and his sense of humour.’
    • ‘He has the knack of sharing information in a readable and entertaining way, so that the subject does not seem too technical and boring.’
    • ‘Graham Greene has an uncanny knack for keeping his readers on the edge of their seats.’
    • ‘According to sports analyst Greg Gumbel, Harris has " a real knack for the game".’
    gift, talent, flair, genius, instinct, faculty, ability, capability, capacity, aptitude, aptness, bent, forte, facility, dexterity, adroitness, readiness, quickness, ingenuity, proficiency, expertness, competence
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A tendency to do something.
      ‘John had the enviable knack of falling asleep anywhere’
      • ‘You've got a real knack for getting in trouble, don't you?’
      • ‘Speaking of sports ministers, it seems they all have a knack for putting their foot in it.’
      • ‘My dad is the type of guy who'll only sing at Christmas, but he has a knack for getting out his harmonica at unexpected moments.’

Origin

Late Middle English (originally denoting a clever or deceitful trick): probably related to obsolete knack ‘sharp blow or sound’, of imitative origin (compare with Dutch knak crack, snap).

Pronunciation:

knack

/nak/