Main definitions of kit in English

: kit1kit2kit3kit4

kit1

noun

  • 1A set of articles or equipment needed for a specific purpose.

    ‘a first-aid kit’
    • ‘Divers rummaging here have found bottles of cold cream, canisters of celluloid photographic film, silver salt cellars, printing stamps, shaving kits, and lead soldiers.’
    • ‘Aid began pouring in yesterday, with the Red Cross sending 400 first-aid kits to the affected area.’
    • ‘First-aid kits are readily available from Boots and other pharmacies in a range of sizes.’
    • ‘Hold on to your shaving kit, a fresh shirt and a change of underwear.’
    • ‘He dropped out of an architecture degree course at 20 and bought a drum kit.’
    • ‘This means my kit has supplies and equipment to handle local emergencies as well as the extremes found in the mountains and desert.’
    • ‘You can buy special kits containing sanitised hypodermic needles and blood plasma for travel to underdeveloped countries.’
    • ‘The kits included pencils and paper, but also a calculator.’
    • ‘Make sure you pack an emergency travel kit containing plenty of survival items.’
    • ‘On some of the trips we have had around the world, if you didn't take your own kit you had to fish with some pretty awful stuff.’
    • ‘I asked her what the problem was, and she told me that she had missed her period, and had checked herself out with a pregnancy-testing kit, and that it had proved positive.’
    • ‘The kit contains a chef's knife, a serrated knife, a thin long knife for slicing meat, a boning knife, a paring knife, and a pair of scissors.’
    • ‘The task team said there was no basic medical emergency equipment such as a first-aid kit or oxygen.’
    • ‘As the divers assembled their kit we discussed the plan for the day.’
    • ‘In the first-aid kit there is also a guide on using basic tools and equipment in emergency situations.’
    • ‘He says that the ancient Greeks used lavender honey to heal wounds; in World War II, lavender was part of soldiers' burn kits.’
    • ‘Celebrity makeup artist Meg Thompson has created a makeup kit for young women that even mothers would approve of.’
    • ‘Parents worried that their children are taking drugs have turned to £12 do-it-yourself testing kits.’
    • ‘I bought a drum kit, was taking lessons and everything.’
    • ‘The gardener's therapy kit contains really good hand cream and a relaxing bath soak.’
    equipment, tools, implements, instruments, gadgets, utensils, appliances, tools of the trade, materials, aids, gear, tackle, hardware, paraphernalia, appurtenances
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British A set of articles forming part of a soldier's equipment.
      • ‘It is light enough that each man in a patrol can carry several Claymores along with his regular kit, weapon and ammo.’
      • ‘At 6.20 am, crowded together in small boats and weighed down with heavy kit, the soldiers approached the deserted shore in silence.’
      • ‘Soldiers packed tents and kits to move to new positions in readiness for the imminent assault.’
      • ‘The armed forces insist every recruit passes through this ordeal with flying colours before they take charge of real kit worth millions of pounds of taxpayers' money.’
      • ‘Shops with specialist Army departments have reported an increase in sales of kit to soldiers.’
      • ‘In fact, most servicemen would not trust their wives to iron their kit, says one Royal Marines officer.’
      • ‘One of the major differences in operating procedures was what the average soldier was carrying in his kit.’
      • ‘Soldiers who spoke to the Evening Gazette today said they had not seen any need to supplement Army issue desert kit by buying their own.’
      • ‘Many have spent hundreds of pounds customising their kit from army surplus stores ahead of being deployed to the Middle East.’
      • ‘A policy of armed neutrality with an emphasis on quality kit, fit for purpose.’
      • ‘First, they are heavy, and adding them to a soldier's kit that already includes ammunitions, rations, and other heavy items may be undesirable.’
      • ‘In the past, a soldier's sense of being part of a broader purpose suppressed moans about kit.’
      • ‘Mrs Roberts has called on the Defence Secretary to quit his Cabinet job over failures to get vital kit to soldiers.’
      • ‘Of course the kit was clean: soldiers spend hours cleaning their equipment.’
      equipment, tools, implements, instruments, gadgets, utensils, appliances, tools of the trade, materials, aids, gear, tackle, hardware, paraphernalia, appurtenances
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A set of all the parts needed to assemble something.
      ‘an aircraft kit’
      • ‘Garage kits contain everything from plans to roofing, and simplify everything from the permit process to the actual construction.’
      • ‘Assembly kits range in suitability from young children to senior citizens.’
      • ‘A mantel kit usually comes partially assembled with a surround that you can cut to suit the dimensions of your fireplace.’
      • ‘The kit and the assembly manual are more than just a little reminiscent of a certain Swedish furniture store…’
      • ‘The association is also urging the FAA to allow imported aircraft kits to be put together without requiring a production certificate.’
      • ‘The first mass-production car-builder in Britain was Ford's, which initially assembled imported kits from the USA.’
      • ‘BMC set about developing plants in Belgium, Spain and Italy that could assemble cars from kits manufactured in the UK.’
      • ‘Even World War II aircraft kits are being hit with royalty demands.’
      • ‘A variety of these all-weather tents are available in kits costing from $2,900 to $5,900.’
      • ‘Airplane kits and aircraft materials were shipped from both locations.’
      • ‘Instead of being produced in a plant, the vehicle comes in a more than 500 piece kit, ready for assembly.’
      • ‘When customers began to ask for assembled radios, employees took the kits home and assembled them for extra money.’
      • ‘Sixty workers from Lucent Technology in Westlea spent the afternoon assembling the bike kits before handing them over to their new owners.’
      • ‘Right now, he has some 1,000 kits waiting to be assembled.’
      • ‘Nick Robshaw, 22, has spent the last 18 months helping his dad, Brian, and neighbour Phil Jenkinson, build a kit aircraft.’
      • ‘The pilot had bought the aircraft in kit form and spent five months constructing it.’
      • ‘So I went to their website to see about ordering a replacement assembly kit.’
      • ‘I assembled the kit according to instructions.’
      • ‘Model car kits are highly collectable and dealer Bob Dobinson tells Giles Chapman that to some fans even their smell is something special’
      • ‘Every pack comes with a two free ‘make it yourself’ aircraft kits.’
      set of parts, set of components, set, outfit, diy kit, do-it-yourself kit, self-assembly set, flat-pack
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  • 2British The clothing used for an activity such as a sport.

    ‘a football kit’
    • ‘Shirt Amnesty is a scheme designed by BBC Radio Five Live and the Football Association to put those old football shirts and kits to use.’
    • ‘Schools in the North West and North Midlands have received over 67,000 items of free sports kit.’
    • ‘Both teams come on to the field in their second kits: Croatia in blue with red and white-checked sleeves and England in red with white shorts.’
    • ‘It was 45 minutes before kick-off and we were dressed in full kit, without boots, doing some leg weights and stretches.’
    • ‘Throughout his time at the club he has done everything from playing and coaching to washing the kit.’
    • ‘Participants should bring a packed lunch, football kit (boots and shin-pads), warm clothes and a waterproof.’
    • ‘Fans are encouraged to attend in their kit and a collection will be taken for the Burns Unit at Bradford Royal Infirmary.’
    • ‘The football kit was handed over to squad members at the school on Wednesday.’
    • ‘David Gorwood explained that the Rugby Football League had introduced a new rule which stated that clubs had to have two distinctive kits in different colours for home and away games.’
    • ‘For the first time in 133 years of international football, the England kit carried on it something other than the three lions badge and the sponsor's logo.’
    • ‘Supporters who bought the latest design will be able to exchange their shirts for the new kit.’
    • ‘Thompson decided not to wear his blazer and tie and instead donned his gym kit.’
    • ‘St Andrews wore their new football kit of blue shirts, red shorts and white socks.’
    • ‘Children will need to bring their football kit and a packed lunch.’
    • ‘The new tracksuit will be worn along with the school's white crested polo shirt, whereas the PE kit for the younger pupils in the school will remain as they are.’
    • ‘Without a hard-working manager, committed coach, league organiser or founder, even someone who washes the kit, sport at grassroots level would simply not exist.’
    • ‘I'd insisted on wearing my football kit, and mum and dad were too tired to argue.’
    • ‘From running the under 10s team to arranging a new kit, training clothes and tracksuits he also does things like cleaning boots and setting goalposts up.’
    • ‘The funds raised will also go towards sports kit and equipment, and coaching resources.’
    • ‘The Office of Fair Trading announced it had fined 10 businesses a total of £18.6 million for fixing the price of replica football kits.’
    clothes, clothing, rig, outfit, dress, costume, garments, attire, garb
    View synonyms
  • 3British A large basket, box, or other container, especially for fish.

verb

[with object]kit someone/something out/up
British
  • Provide someone or something with the appropriate clothing or equipment.

    ‘we were all kitted out in life jackets’
    • ‘On arrival clients are kitted out with waterproof clothing and lifejackets and receive a safety briefing before embarking on a coastal tour of Dublin's coastline.’
    • ‘Only some of the Gardai were kitted out in uniforms that day.’
    • ‘All studios are kitted out with the most up-to-date digital technology.’
    • ‘Planning permission has been applied for and the company wants to start kitting the building out in August.’
    • ‘The Home Office said two schools, two hospitals and an ambulance station would be kitted out with the new equipment to give better security for staff, patients and pupils.’
    • ‘Orkney's two mobile library vans could be kitted out with laptop computers at a cost of £2,000.’
    • ‘U.S. delegates have been kitted out with gas masks, two-way radios and drugs to combat bioterrorism.’
    • ‘He is now on the look out for a kind sponsor to help kit him out for the next six months he will spend pounding the streets of his home town in training for the event.’
    • ‘Lucinda has pitched a tent for us and kitted it out with blankets and stuff, which is really nice.’
    • ‘Tesco plan to kit trolleys out with DVD players for kids, according to this news article.’
    • ‘Where the problems start is in kitting the boat out and deciding where items are best stowed for ease of accessibility, but with the constant problem of maximising space at all times.’
    • ‘Rangers are playing all in blue, while Stuttgart are kitted out in a largely white strip.’
    • ‘The firefighters are kitted out in special red one-piece thermal suits as well as boots, a helmet and gloves.’
    • ‘To carry out the hugely complex job of managing over 400,000 transatlantic crossings every year, the air traffic control centre in Shannon has been kitted out with state-of-the-art equipment.’
    • ‘We had just spent £50,000 kitting this place out after moving here a month ago.’
    • ‘He tells me that he bought the farm and outhouses five years ago for £1.3m, and spent another million refurbishing and kitting them out.’
    • ‘If somehow he did find the rent and move in ‘it would cost thousands to kit it out.’’
    • ‘Youngsters at Burnley's Barden Junior School have been kitted out with a brand new football team strip thanks to a school governor.’
    • ‘Incidentally, all five-door Grand Vitara models have been kitted out with electrically adjustable, heated door mirrors.’
    • ‘To date, some 175 classrooms have been kitted out with the equipment.’
    equip, fit, fit out, fit up, fix up, furnish, stock, supply, provide, provision, issue
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • get one's kit off

    • informal Take off all one's clothes.

      • ‘There was a room full of about 250 women watching seven men get their kit off.’
      • ‘So this weekend I decided it was officially hot enough to get my kit off.’
      • ‘I suspected the girls didn't take kindly to being asked to get their kit off.’
      • ‘I'll probably be watching Celebrity Big Brother on Channel 4 - hoping that Brigitte Nielsen DOESN'T get her kit off.’
      • ‘It's not often you'll see a journalist getting their kit off to make a point.’
      • ‘Of course, Elle, Kylie and Sarah do nothing to dispel the stereotype of Australia as a paradise where hot chicks constantly get their kit off.’
      • ‘Actually, she's got her kit off in most films she's done before.’
      • ‘It's not as if I feel the contestants are being exploited: presumably they were longing to get their kit off in the Maldives in the pursuit of celebrity and a supposedly glamorous career.’
      • ‘We understand that Lara declined the offer to pose nude, but would consider getting her kit off on-screen ‘if the character and the plot justified it’.’
      • ‘In fact, almost all the cast - including Hoskins and the pop star Will Young in his first film role - get their kit off.’

Origin

Middle English: from Middle Dutch kitte ‘wooden vessel’, of unknown origin. The original sense ‘wooden tub’ was later applied to other containers; the use denoting a soldier's equipment (late 18th century) probably arose from the idea of a set of articles packed in a container.

Pronunciation

kit

/kɪt/

Main definitions of kit in English

: kit1kit2kit3kit4

kit2

noun

  • 1The young of certain animals, such as the beaver, ferret, and mink.

    • ‘Mink kits remain in the same cage as their mothers until weaned at the age of seven to eight weeks.’
    • ‘Since 1997, 110 black-footed ferret kits have been released on the site.’
    • ‘The usual family group consists of the adults, the kits, and the yearlings of the previous year.’
    • ‘When I finally got back to the place, however, I did not find a puppy but four gray fox kits near the hole that was obviously their den.’
    • ‘Nest boxes should remain in the rabbit cage until the kits are 4 weeks old.’
    1. 1.1informal A kitten.
      • ‘I've watched mother cats nip their kits for playing too rough.’

Pronunciation

kit

/kɪt/

Main definitions of kit in English

: kit1kit2kit3kit4

kit3

noun

historical
  • A small violin, especially one used by a dancing master.

    • ‘Prince Turveydrop then tinkled the strings of his kit with his fingers, and the young ladies stood up to dance.’

Origin

Early 16th century: perhaps from Latin cithara (see cittern).

Pronunciation

kit

/kɪt/

Main definitions of kit in English

: kit1kit2kit3kit4

kit4

noun

rare
  • A flock of pigeons.

    ‘he saw a kit of pigeons flying when out one day’
    • ‘I watched my big kit of pigeons fly over in a constantly changing formation.’
    • ‘I knew they had seen a kit of pigeons over the town eight miles away.’
    • ‘Doc was letting out a kit of pigeons.’
    • ‘He had seen openings large enough to fly a kit of pigeons.’
    • ‘A good kit of pigeons is a joy to watch.’

Origin

Late 19th century: apparently from German Kitte or Kütte ‘flock or group of doves’.

Pronunciation

kit

/kɪt/