Definition of kinship in English:

kinship

noun

mass noun
  • 1Blood relationship.

    • ‘Patterns of traditional kinship still shape the social conventions of family life.’
    • ‘Nor were they bound together solely by ties of kinship or blood.’
    • ‘It is bound together by kinship ties of blood and especially brotherhood.’
    • ‘Kenyans place a high value on family relationships and the importance of kinship.’
    • ‘But what do refusals to engage with kinship's allegedly sordid past achieve?’
    • ‘Becoming a friend gave one the rights and obligations associated with kinship.’
    • ‘In the matrifocal household type, kinship rules stress matrilinear descent.’
    • ‘Matrilineal kinship was relatively unknown in the rest of India, though it was not unusual in Kerala itself.’
    • ‘The link between patrilineal kinship and patriarchy requires far more scrutiny than is possible in this paper.’
    • ‘It attempted to create kinship without blood in the face of an enduring equivalence between blood and belonging.’
    • ‘Within classes there are strong kinship bonds, which help maintain the social structure.’
    • ‘For ethnic Fijians, interpersonal relationships and social behavior are governed by links of kinship.’
    • ‘Betrayal of the figure who embodies loyalty to community and kinship can be read as a choice to follow a foreign set of values.’
    • ‘In conventional wisdom, the family refers to those to whom we are related by blood kinship.’
    • ‘Likewise there is no established framework of social relations, such as kinship, which people can be slotted into.’
    • ‘Inuit social organization was largely based on bilateral kinship relations.’
    • ‘It is therefore almost impossible to separate kinship from trading relations and cooperation.’
    • ‘Relationships are not given in kinship but rather need to be made and continually remade.’
    • ‘Flesh and bone, or, as in the later idiom, flesh and blood, thus epitomizes kinship, the tangible bonds between family members.’
    • ‘Social relations among the Luo are governed by rules of kinship, gender, and age.’
    relationship, relatedness, being related, family ties, family connections, blood relationship, blood ties, common ancestry, common lineage, kindred, connection
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    1. 1.1count noun A sharing of characteristics or origins.
      ‘they felt a kinship with architects’
      • ‘He does not feel a kinship with the countries of his forebears.’
      • ‘This, ultimately, is a play about existential resemblances and contrasts, kinships and irreconcilables, uncomfortable truths and futile lies that underlie delicate relationships and unbridgeable chasms.’
      • ‘I really like it when ladies write me, because I feel a real kinship with women.’
      • ‘Comparison of DNA in living humans provides clues to ancestral kinships.’
      • ‘Their body language revealed a kinship forged on set in the Philippines.’
      • ‘I developed a kinship with sickly romantic poets who couldn't play games.’
      • ‘We had a kinship because of our Irishness and because he had seen and related to my work.’
      • ‘Nonetheless, as other passages from the book make clear, the relationships between artists and their supporters do not imply ideological kinships between them.’
      • ‘There's an obvious kinship between skateboarding and contact improvisation.’
      • ‘Suffice it to say that men are freaks, and I feel a budding kinship with all of the world's borderline lesbians.’
      • ‘For Benjamin, translation functions not simply to transcribe accurately the content of the original language into another but also, and more importantly, to seek kinships between both languages.’
      • ‘Though different, we share similarities, kinships, commitments, and suffering, and this common ground is as significant as the privileging of the individual.’
      • ‘The unmanageable profusion of tags for people, places, and kinships, distinguishes scientific expertise from other modes of knowledge and authority.’
      • ‘They shared a special kinship as their daughters both suffered from the same disease and were roughly the same age.’
      • ‘A minority bands together and feels a kinship, if only for a moment that is as long as a muttered wassup, man?’
      • ‘That is why we profess a spiritual kinship with primitive and archaic art.’
      • ‘We share a kinship that I've never had with anyone else, save my parents and Uncle Terry.’
      • ‘We have more and more opportunity to be unlimited in our kinships; to find like minds and make new places.’
      • ‘There's, sort of, six people who know what we do, and I feel a kinship to them, as opposed to a rivalry.’
      • ‘At the same time, it revealed for me kinships that the vast machinery of global capital and state politics works so hard to keep hidden.’
      affinity, sympathy, kindred, rapport, harmony, understanding, alliance, association, empathy, closeness, fellow feeling, bond, community, communion, compatibility, link, accord, friendship, togetherness
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Pronunciation

kinship

/ˈkɪnʃɪp/