Main definitions of kindle in English

: kindle1kindle2

kindle1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Set (something) on fire.

    • ‘Last night I built the first fire I've kindled in years and it came back to me, that instinctual pull of watching the flames catch, of stirring the embers, and poking the logs until they burn brightly.’
    • ‘Sent by God, however, he came to bear witness concerning the true light that kindles all lights.’
    • ‘Surely a preacher can warm his heart at the fires these men have kindled.’
    • ‘Due to the chill brought by the surrounding rain, a large fire had been kindled in the fireplace next to her bed.’
    • ‘John's baptismal water may put out some of the fires we have kindled ourselves.’
    • ‘It is a firm belief that this inner light can be kindled to brilliance through yogic practices.’
    • ‘What a great fire had been kindled from such a little spark…’
    • ‘During this holiday, another tradition has all the fires in the village extinguished, and the ‘Need fire’ is kindled.’
    • ‘A signal fire, kindled with the lens of Piggy's glasses, is established on the mountain to call passing ships to their rescue while shelters are constructed.’
    • ‘This was the reason it happened, to reveal in advance the defining event of the New Testament, like a mirror catching its light even before the light was kindled.’
    • ‘Using the materials Anthak brought him, he quickly kindled a small hot fire under the tripod.’
    • ‘The mitzvah of kindling the Chanukah lights begins with sunset.’
    • ‘Until this time, most of the population lived in dark, smoke-filled cottages heated by open fires kindled in the centre of an ‘open hall’.’
    • ‘The housekeeper had put a fragrant pot of balsam in the window and kindled a pine-knot fire in the brazier.’
    • ‘The black fire that Goud had kindled in the 1960s now blazes with a new maturity, a new candour.’
    • ‘The fire that had been kindled in my skull leaked and spread into my veins, arteries, every pore, and traveled the length of my body, infusing all with heat.’
    • ‘A boy from the Jewish Quarter's religious youth movement kindled the Chanukah lights in large cans on an embankment near the gate.’
    • ‘All that could be carried off was taken, all that could not was wasted by the fires they kindled, even onto the humblest grain store-house of the poor cottars.’
    • ‘They promptly take the ball and throw it in a fire they have kindled in a 55-gallon barrel.’
    • ‘The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.’
    light, ignite, set alight, set light to, set on fire, set fire to, put a match to, set burning, get going, start, touch off, spark
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Arouse or inspire (an emotion or feeling)
      ‘a love of art was kindled in me’
      • ‘The loving care and concern for the monument evinced by the volunteers, park rangers and staff members, has an infectious effect, kindling a similar feeling in the visitors, young and old alike.’
      • ‘Moreover, student involvement and curiosity will be kindled when they bring waste material for conducting these experiments, he adds.’
      • ‘Even in a division starved of a genuine relegation dogfight, this was an important marker of progress, while for the visitors, authentic promotion hopes have been kindled of late.’
      • ‘His interest is further kindled with the arrival of the balloonist's granddaughter, the combative Kate.’
      • ‘Rajagopal, one of Thyagu's university teachers, further kindled his interest by inspiring him to participate in research work being done at that time on the history of Sanskrit.’
      • ‘A delicate mission, perhaps, to kindle friendship or extend love, but such is the structure of a psychology burdened by confrontation of animal hunger.’
      • ‘So from early July, the Carnival spirit had already been kindled in my soul.’
      • ‘Now the Scriptures ascribe such dispositions to God: the anger of the Lord, says the psalm, was kindled against his people.’
      • ‘My interest in flying was first kindled in 2000 when our school toured the air force museum in Pretoria.’
      • ‘This fusion of martial and performing arts is sure to kindle the curiosity of the young, who adapt easily to innovations.’
      • ‘Frasier invites her home for drinks with hopes of kindling a romance, but is miffed when Martin captures her attention instead.’
      • ‘Nor was it ignorance that spurred him to fashion numerous additional devices that ensured his plague picture would kindle its audience's most painful passions.’
      • ‘They mix with the crowd telling stories and dropping one-liners to kindle interest and build suspense.’
      • ‘It is this creative act of citizenship that kindles hope and inspires action beyond bureaucratic bounds.’
      • ‘Events such as Bangalore Habba kindle the emotions of people, she added.’
      • ‘We hope the foregoing non-exhaustive recital will serve to kindle pride and interest in our collective heritage.’
      • ‘This kindles something inside of them, which will hopefully grow into a love for the environment as they get older.’
      • ‘I closed my eyes and was mildly perturbed to find the news didn't really kindle any emotion in me.’
      • ‘It is this bent nose that kindled our curiosity and prompted our investigation.’
      • ‘The awareness created among the backward communities has kindled their interest in conditions in other parts of the world.’
    2. 1.2[no object](of an emotion) be aroused.
      ‘she hesitated, suspicion kindling within her’
      • ‘Hope of escape kindled within as the terror of bondage loosened.’
      • ‘In an unlikely romance that kindles between two single New Yorkers at an airport, they cross paths for a long while till they have the courage to finally make a connection.’
      • ‘Maybe we waited too long, killed the flames of lust before they even kindled.’
      • ‘Barely controlled fury kindled in Kayline's eyes.’
      • ‘Hope had kindled in her heart when news of her pregnancy came, praying to the gods she'd have something to live for.’
      • ‘For the first time since the battle, Dovark actually had a slimmer of hope kindling within him.’
      • ‘It should be clear that the best antidote to radicalism and terror is the tolerance and hope kindled in free societies.’
      • ‘It was replaced with a cold rage kindling in the pit of her stomach as she stared at her so called father.’
      • ‘It was mid-afternoon when Arun knelt beside the fledgling, a faint hope kindling.’
    3. 1.3[no object]Become impassioned or excited.
      ‘the young man kindled at once’
      • ‘He kindled at the very sight of books.’
      • ‘She kindled to the blend of feudalism and democracy.’

Origin

Middle English: based on Old Norse kynda, influenced by Old Norse kindill candle, torch.

Pronunciation:

kindle

/ˈkɪnd(ə)l/

Main definitions of kindle in English

: kindle1kindle2

kindle2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of a hare or rabbit) give birth.

    ‘a day or two before she kindles, the mother will pull out some of her fur to make a soft lining’
    • ‘Some rabbit owners are fortunate enough to witness the rabbit kindling.’
    • ‘Only rarely does a mother rabbit nurse her young right after giving birth. Most often the first nursing will occur the night after the kindling.’
    • ‘Two days before she kindled, she got loose and spent the day in the woods near the barns.’

noun

rare
  • A litter of kittens.

    ‘she was asked to take in a kindle of kittens’
    • ‘This is actually the fourth call this week from someone who has found a kindle of kittens abandoned somewhere.’
    • ‘She had borne twelve litters in fewer years, barely having time to train one kindle of kittens before the next lot was born.’
    • ‘A kindle of kittens rescued from a box behind a dumpster have become online stars.’
    • ‘The six oversized paint by number pictures include one of a kindle of kittens in a basket.’
    • ‘We'd much prefer a potted plant that we can see grow year after year or a kindle of kittens.’

Origin

Middle English: apparently a frequentative of kind.

Pronunciation:

kindle

/ˈkɪnd(ə)l/