Definition of khat in English:

khat

(also qat)

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The leaves of an Arabian shrub, which are chewed (or drunk as an infusion) as a stimulant.

    • ‘Earnings from khat, an amphetamine like stimulant that is banned in the United States and several European countries, has doubled.’
    • ‘Farmers have been forced to produce khat (a local narcotic) in order to survive.’
    • ‘Knowledgeable users maintain that chewing khat has more in common with coffee than cocaine.’
    • ‘Try to avoid chewing khat late at night, and never take sleeping pills unless prescribed by your doctor.’
    • ‘Once the khat has been acquired, the customer leaves with a smile of satisfaction and anticipation.’
    • ‘But officials came to believe most of the flights were Yemeni smugglers bring in khat, a leafy plant widely chewed in Somalia for its mild narcotic effect.’
    • ‘The area is known for extensive trading in livestock, hides and skins, khat, cereals, and consumer durables.’
    • ‘The 530 kg shipment of khat, a green-leafed drug which is chewed to produce a euphoric effect, was found in air freight.’
    • ‘In Somali communities, chewing a traditional stimulant called khat has landed some people in deportation proceedings, since the leaf is now categorized as a controlled substance.’
    • ‘Mead was probably the first human-made intoxicant, barring potions brewed from various solanaceous psychoactives - peyote, khat, mandrake, poisonous toads, etc.’
    • ‘Indeed, withdrawal from khat results in social isolation, according to this article.’
    • ‘The first reaction to khat is unpleasant and marked by feeling of dizziness an intense thirst.’
    • ‘Mahdi chews khat, a semi-narcotic leaf that has wired generations of Muslims from the coast of eastern Africa to Yemen at the tip of the Arabian Peninsula.’
  • 2The shrub that produces khat, growing in mountainous regions and often cultivated.

    • ‘Ethiopian officials said they are not going to stop farmers from growing khat, but are trying to offer alternatives.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Arabic qāt.

Pronunciation:

khat

/kɑːt/