Definition of kerb in English:

kerb

(North American, US curb)

noun

  • A stone edging to a pavement or raised path.

    • ‘Rising bollards, bus-priority traffic lights and redesigned kerbs, which match the height of lowering buses, will be phased in.’
    • ‘I was almost knocked off my bike by three different cars pulling over at the last moment and parking straddling the kerb and road rendering the cycle lane worthless.’
    • ‘He lost control of the car, striking a kerb, a stone wall and a telegraph pole.’
    • ‘Traces of the stone kerb can be seen on the east side.’
    • ‘They cross zebra crossings when pedestrians are on them, mount the kerb and have a disregard for cycle lanes.’
    • ‘The good news was that the attractive cul-de-sac's pavements and kerbs were to be overhauled.’
    • ‘He was just stepping into the bus lane off the left kerb as I went past.’
    • ‘Local government also wastes a lot of resources on building kerbs, enlarging traffic islands, putting in vast amounts of street furniture to obstruct vision and unnecessary signage.’
    • ‘It is blindingly obvious that the pavements and kerbs have not been swept for years.’
    • ‘At the junctions, the Council also needs to replace the step kerb with drop kerbs suitable for wheelchairs.’
    • ‘There are not enough drop kerbs and crossings and the pavements are not wide enough in places.’
    • ‘If the plans get the go-ahead they will include improvements to the pavements like dropping kerbs where appropriate.’
    • ‘He was furious with motorists parking outside his firm so he painted double-yellow lines near the kerb.’
    • ‘Works to raise kerbs and improve lighting on the A414 in Danbury will begin on Monday.’
    • ‘And why on earth were the original kerbs and traffic island ripped out and replaced in virtually the same places as before?’
    • ‘They were going to the pelican crossing, but stepped off the kerb because they were frightened by a dog on the pavement.’
    • ‘If I want to travel just a few hundred yards I have to negotiate sloping pavements and steep curbs in my chair.’
    • ‘The car drove across the carriageway and mounted the kerb on the opposite side of the road.’
    • ‘Edging towards the side of the pavement, he sat down on the kerb.’
    • ‘County council contractors will widen the pavement and narrow the road as well as install new paving, kerbs and better street lighting to boost safety and visibility.’

Origin

Mid 17th century (denoting a raised border or frame): variant of curb.

Pronunciation

kerb

/kəːb/