Definition of juxtapose in English:

juxtapose

verb

[with object]
  • Place or deal with close together for contrasting effect.

    ‘black-and-white photos of slums were starkly juxtaposed with colour images’
    • ‘Hence, the film juxtaposes real-life footage of deep sea dives with imagined special effects of what life might look like on other planets in the solar system.’
    • ‘She divides their stories into helpfully labeled chapters that juxtapose their stories at each stage.’
    • ‘The artist's choice of juxtaposing a partially blurred image with a clear one serves to vindicate her own, paint-like style.’
    • ‘The novel juxtaposes three stories of the effects of state violence on marginalized bodies across the African diaspora.’
    • ‘The Animal Liberation Project involves a display of panels juxtaposing graphic images of slavery and other human abuse with pictures of chained animals.’
    • ‘By juxtaposing their class differences, Harper uses economic contrast to suggest that gender perspectives are related to class consciousness.’
    • ‘I was lifting and collaging sentences and sections from all sorts of popular publications and juxtaposing them for effect.’
    • ‘These large contrasts are buttressed by many particulars, as Brooks carefully juxtaposes her protagonist to Eliot's.’
    • ‘When two contrary elements are juxtaposed, the sudden surprise catches us off guard.’
    • ‘We produce the effect of counterpoint by juxtaposing lineal periods with grammatical periods.’
    • ‘Adie's visually-illustrated stage show charts the role women have played in conflict throughout the ages, juxtaposing their part in wartime history with the garments they wore.’
    • ‘Some fascinating comparisons are achieved by juxtaposing the liberty and exclusivity of the traditions of the synagogue with those of the illegal trade of the mafia.’
    • ‘Warm melodic figures are juxtaposed with harsher percussive patterns, setting up some fascinating contrasts in sound.’
    • ‘His whole idea of art is to juxtapose sound, musical associations and imagery together, as well as film, and collage effects.’
    • ‘Voltaire ridicules an old-school philosophical system by juxtaposing it with horrific historical reality.’
    • ‘Your onslaught ended by juxtaposing my yoga discipline with the ‘mess’ in my Scottsdale apartment.’
    • ‘Other paintings in the show juxtapose cinematic effects with sections that insist upon the obdurate flatness of the picture's surface.’
    • ‘He juxtaposes each work with an analogous or contrasting story from the Bible and often relates these to modern experience, especially those of college students.’
    • ‘In juxtaposing a photograph with other elements, Woodman brought together different time spans, historical and spatial contexts and art forms for a totally surreal effect.’
    • ‘By juxtaposing these elements, he not only achieves a variety in his compositions, but also employs means provided by a stark contrast in his experience as a tangentially urbanised painter.’
    place side by side, set side by side, place close to one another, set close to one another, mix
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century (earlier ( Middle English) as juxtaposition): from French juxtaposer, from Latin juxta ‘next’ + French poser ‘to place’.

Pronunciation

juxtapose

/ˌdʒʌkstəˈpəʊz/