Definition of juvenile in English:

juvenile

adjective

  • 1For or relating to young people.

    ‘juvenile crime’
    • ‘Talk to people who live on the Brunshaw estate and the same themes come up time and time again: crime, juvenile nuisance, drug dealing, vandalism and anti-social behaviour.’
    • ‘Despite occasional warnings about a rising tide of juvenile crime, the statistics show a determined resistance to inflation.’
    • ‘It is an indispensable resource for informed professionals who strive to shape the juvenile justice system today.’
    • ‘Curves of this magnitude usually have an infantile or juvenile onset rather than an adolescent onset.’
    • ‘His work with the youth in his role as juvenile liaison officer was remarkable.’
    • ‘The juvenile members of Spa Golf Club were making the most of their mid-term break on Friday.’
    • ‘Surely adults went to see B-Westerns; nonetheless, the war messages in B-Westerns were aimed at a juvenile audience.’
    • ‘At the film's beginning, the juvenile protagonists ride a Ferris wheel and fantasize about traveling to the sea, a child-like sentiment never to be repeated.’
    • ‘As juvenile crime rises, here and across the country, tonight's confessions of a York teenager make provocative reading.’
    • ‘The main goal of the juvenile justice system is rehabilitation rather than punishment.’
    • ‘Psychologists can play a role in the juvenile death penalty debate in several ways.’
    • ‘Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, the police have been the foremost public authorities who regulate juvenile crime and delinquency.’
    • ‘This site is designed to improve the public's understanding of the juvenile justice system and to promote policy reform.’
    • ‘The legislature has to do something about juvenile crimes, particularly the violent ones.’
    • ‘Cowboy stars underscored the identity and nature of the enemy for their juvenile viewers and urged all citizens to do their part to help win the war.’
    • ‘The classification as infantile or juvenile forms depends on the amount of renal disease present.’
    • ‘Despite the apparent convergence with Western juvenile prostitution, clear differences remain that should not be ignored.’
    • ‘Promoting juvenile talent is the lifeblood and future of any sporting club.’
    • ‘But there are issues that should be tackled immediately, especially in the field of juvenile crime.’
    • ‘Typically, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis appears between the ages of 6 months and 16 years.’
    young, teenage, teenaged, adolescent, junior, underage, pubescent, prepubescent
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Denoting a theatrical or film role representing a young person.
      ‘the romantic juvenile lead’
      • ‘Wendy Toye was born in London on 1 May 1917, and at the age of three and a half appeared on stage at the Albert Hall in London as a member of a juvenile dance troupe.’
      • ‘I never had the shape for juvenile leads so I've always had to play character parts.’
      • ‘She didn't suffer fools gladly, which seemed to include all the juvenile actors she had to work with in TV.’
      • ‘Lydon was well known for playing the juvenile lead in a series in the early 1940s, and his work here tends to retain the flavour of that character.’
      • ‘Rarely has a show dealt so honestly with the ageing of its juvenile leads, with Cory, Morgan, Shawn and Topanga seeming to grow up quicker on screen than they were in real life.’
      • ‘Eventually, he got an acting job of 16 weeks in weekly rep, playing juvenile leads in 16 different plays - where he honed his technique.’
      • ‘Michael Conrad is rapidly becoming the light juvenile lead of Oval House.’
      • ‘Over 3,000 boys have already been seen, and the musical's appetite for new talent will remain high throughout its run, with cast changes a legal requirement for the juvenile actors every six months.’
      • ‘So you have the juvenile lead, who's always nice and happy and winsome, and that's the male and female juvenile lead.’
      • ‘He represented Sarsfields at juvenile and minor level, and was chosen as The Patrician College Sportsman of the Year for his achievements on the golf course.’
      • ‘The next day he received a letter from London saying his audition for the juvenile lead in a musical comedy had been successful.’
    2. 1.2 Relating to young birds and animals.
      ‘the prey of juvenile owls’
      ‘juvenile mortality in whelks’
      • ‘At about four years of age young males form a juvenile group.’
      • ‘Juvenile plumage is seldom seen in Washington, although some birds in juvenile plumage can be seen in the eastern flyway.’
      • ‘Siblicide is a cause of juvenile mortality, and so should select for greater investment in survival.’
      • ‘He has also acted as a foster parent to various animals, including a juvenile stork that was taken from its nest and later abandoned.’
      • ‘The second assumption is that juvenile recruitment into bird populations must operate at the same scale as mast production.’
      • ‘A juvenile green turtle was found with a plastic bag wound tightly around its right flipper, cutting off blood flow, aquarium curator Willie Maritz said yesterday.’
      • ‘They stay nearby for 7 to 10 days and then flock with other juvenile birds.’
      • ‘Certainly juvenile animals are a common prey of large carnivores today, and it is no surprise that similar patterns should have played out in the past.’
      • ‘Actual juvenile mortality rates for large mammals are generally higher than indicated by life tables based on bone assemblages.’
      • ‘In juvenile birds and birds molting into adult plumage for the first time, the shield was typically a deep purple.’
      • ‘Adult males seem to winter farther north than females and juvenile birds.’
      • ‘In juvenile birds, females were much more philopatric than males as indicated by the ratio being much less than one for both Alberta and Saskatchewan in Figure 4.’
      • ‘The juvenile captive birds bound for release are shipped to Mississippi after about a month, and they quickly learn to fit in with the refuge population.’
      • ‘Migratory movements have been recorded in both juvenile and adult birds.’
      • ‘A few holes offer the only relief, and even these are inhabited by juvenile green morays.’
      • ‘We conducted focal animal observations on juvenile three-spot damselfish in both continuous and patch reef habitat in 1991 and 1997.’
      • ‘After that they may join a flock of other juvenile birds.’
      • ‘In lower vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, the pronephros acts as the functional kidney in the immature juvenile stages, but the mesonephros is the functional kidney in the adult.’
      • ‘We used molecular markers to sex juvenile birds captured at the feeding stations in July or August and used plumage characteristics to sex all other birds.’
      • ‘We attributed the effect of predator exclusion primarily to juvenile green crabs and fish.’
  • 2Childish; immature.

    ‘she's bored with my juvenile conversation’
    • ‘He probably thought that I was an immature and juvenile little child, which I can be, when I'm near Garret.’
    • ‘The Earl of Tyrconnell was no better than King William's officers, King James was as juvenile and foolish as King William, and Irish national identity as a whole became the object of scorn.’
    • ‘Just when we're sure that they can't get any sillier or more juvenile, they come along with a stunning new innovation that shows us what we're paying them to do.’
    • ‘Asked about the motivation for the vandalism, he said it was simply a case of very juvenile, immature peer pressure.’
    • ‘The movie isn't without its flaws, however, as some of the humour is rather juvenile, and some just plain stupid.’
    • ‘I know it sounds juvenile and stupid but I really wanted to see the look on Skinner's face.’
    • ‘This business of spinning into outer space is just so juvenile and naive that one has to wonder why these booklets didn't burst into flames on the printing press.’
    • ‘For a moment it crossed her mind that what she was doing was juvenile and silly, but she had made up her mind.’
    • ‘It's juvenile and plain silly, and I don't like it contextually as a roleplayer.’
    • ‘It was a silly, juvenile thing to do and it ended with both of them standing there holding bits of the piece of paper - and both claiming phyrric victories.’
    • ‘As juvenile and immaturely sexist as this may seem, you will never imagine how useful this can be.’
    • ‘I feel this need to show people we can do it on our own but I recognize how silly and destructive and completely juvenile this attitude is.’
    • ‘Regret is the type of emotion that makes you think of past times and think how stupid and juvenile you were because of the choices you made.’
    • ‘He crumpled up the juvenile green and yellow paper wrappings and tossed them into a plastic sack.’
    • ‘This tour is excruciatingly banal and juvenile, lightened only by the silly antics of his friend Joe.’
    • ‘Secondly, he is sitting upon a pitchfork and refuses to move himself, or thirdly he is a silly, juvenile incompetent and has no place in this Chamber.’
    • ‘Let me clarify: they aren't acting immature or juvenile; they're acting like young, inexperienced adults.’
    • ‘Ally felt herself smiling, even though their entire conversation had been so utterly juvenile.’
    • ‘All of that may sound juvenile and silly, but the chaos really only lasts for 10 minutes of the 50-minute performance.’
    childish, immature, puerile, infantile, babyish
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A young person.

    • ‘It was the first time that the juveniles (boys and girls) took part in this competition.’
    • ‘Over the last month we have had problems with juveniles on the seafront.’
    • ‘The competition catered for all ages, with categories including juveniles, juniors, adults and golden oldies.’
    • ‘It promises efforts to correct behavioural problems among juveniles and to adopt changes to educational programmes, with new curricula, texts and teaching methods to reduce stress on kids.’
    • ‘The club caters for juniors and juveniles on Fridays from 7.30 to 11 pm and for adults only on Wednesday nights from 7.30 to 11 pm.’
    • ‘Latino and black young people have been hit hardest by the crackdown on juveniles.’
    • ‘The valuable contribution animals can make in a classroom and to the healthy development of children and juveniles has already been established.’
    • ‘For narcotics offences, the number of arrests of juveniles and young people aged below 21 dropped by 16.8per cent to 454.’
    • ‘18-to - 24-year-olds don't seem to be kids, and they don't seem to be juveniles.’
    • ‘We have a big problem with juveniles drinking in these areas.’
    • ‘Indeed, the same could apply to rugby where there is little precaution to shield juniors and juveniles from being exposed to the habits of their superiors.’
    • ‘Race arguments were dismissed and problems were believed to be attributed to the juveniles ' family situations.’
    • ‘The juveniles defeated Kiltimagh to win the county title and the minors were beaten by Westport in the league final.’
    • ‘The club have been reformed and are catering for juveniles and juniors.’
    • ‘Police in Blackburn confirmed that there had been some minor disorder involving juveniles at the event and one person had been arrested for carrying an offensive weapon.’
    • ‘The judging panel were impressed with the vast range of sporting activity being provided for all ages within the parish, particularly the emphasis being put upon juveniles - boys and girls.’
    • ‘Among the 55 Romanians deported were 33 men, 11 women, three juveniles and five children.’
    • ‘A full list of county championships was held for juveniles, juniors and senior track and field and cross-country.’
    • ‘But drug companies carry out few trials involving children because drugs for juveniles are not very profitable and there are ethical difficulties in using youngsters as ‘guinea pigs’.’
    • ‘Unsupervised juveniles engaging in anti-social activity has been an ongoing problem for the shires of Irwin and Mullewa.’
    young person, youngster, child, teenager, adolescent, minor, junior
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Law A person below the age at which ordinary criminal prosecution is possible (18 in most countries)
      ‘the law relating to the sentencing of juveniles’
      • ‘While the age of juveniles in the criminal justice system will be raised from 17 to 18, the only other change will see significant new powers put into the hands of the police.’
      • ‘However, after yesterday's verdict, Justice Malcolm Holdip said he had to defer sentencing to today because he was unable to find the proper sentencing for convicted juveniles.’
      • ‘But legal considerations plausibly have a great deal to do with increases in incarceration, capital punishment, and criminal prosecution of juveniles.’
      • ‘The second is that it is important that juveniles be held on remand in places where they mix with others of their own age.’
      • ‘In my judgment, Parliament has clearly, in sections 39 and 49, drawn a distinction between juveniles appearing in youth courts and juveniles appearing in adult courts.’
    2. 1.2 An actor playing a juvenile role.
      • ‘Just 18, she played her first lead role in the film: she had been a juvenile in her previous appearance.’
      • ‘But, now and then, a juvenile comes along who actually deserves to be called an 'actor'.’
      • ‘Bill specialized in likeable but none-too-bright juveniles and young leads.’
    3. 1.3 A young bird or animal.
      ‘the light-coloured plumage of a juvenile’
      • ‘Most adult electric eels will feed on smaller fish, while juveniles will prey mainly on smaller invertebrates.’
      • ‘We found evidence indicating that increased movement rates may increase the risk of predation for adult birds but not juveniles.’
      • ‘The high disparity of young juveniles may seem surprising given the perception that embryos and larvae are typically more similar than adults.’
      • ‘Investigators have also observed newly independent juveniles preying on young of the same or related species.’
      • ‘Last season's leading juvenile was an impressive winner of the Breeders' Cup Juvenile at Belmont Park last year.’
      • ‘Other studies of riparian breeding birds in which juveniles molt on the breeding grounds have not examined that possibility.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin juvenilis, from juvenis ‘young, a young person’.

Pronunciation

juvenile

/ˈdʒuːvənʌɪl/