Definition of junior in English:

junior

adjective

  • 1For or denoting young or younger people.

    ‘junior tennis’
    • ‘He was once a nationally-ranked Canadian junior tennis player.’
    • ‘Last Friday a junior tennis tournament was cancelled as a result.’
    • ‘The club is supportive of local junior golfers by inviting young players and high school students to play the course free of charge.’
    • ‘There is a star rising, and rising fast, in local junior tennis.’
    • ‘Much of the that money will be spent on rugby education programs, junior clubs and elite development of younger players.’
    • ‘He then became the youngest ever junior world champion the following year.’
    • ‘Students who had set up and run a mini company under the junior achievement young enterprise programme were eligible to enter the competition.’
    • ‘At 11, she became the youngest Belgian junior champion.’
    • ‘Sporting activities have not been neglected, with events ranging from junior tennis to a South African title boxing match.’
    • ‘The junior team, with a very young side, were defeated last week in an away game to Barrowhouse in Division 3.’
    • ‘Two young players were brought on for their first experience of junior football.’
    • ‘Matt and Chris are junior county tennis champions.’
    • ‘She pointed out that it would be encouraging to see young people getting involved and that perhaps a junior association could be formed.’
    • ‘The village has a busy sports and social scene with football, cricket and tennis clubs, plus junior football teams and uniformed clubs for the youngsters.’
    • ‘It is going to be a five-year project and I want to give back whatever I can to Swedish junior tennis.’
    • ‘The family spent their summers at Ardmore in Waterford, where O'Callaghan is known to have played in junior tennis tournaments.’
    • ‘For the older boys and girls there were quad bikes and for the young horse enthusiasts there was the keenly contested junior hunt chase, and pony club games.’
    • ‘The club is continuing to expand the junior section and welcomes young people who would like to take up the game.’
    • ‘Wildlife Watch is the UK's leading action club for young environmentalists and junior members have the opportunity to collect badges.’
    • ‘Canadians also showcased a strong cadre of younger skaters in the junior events.’
    younger, youngest
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British For or denoting schoolchildren between the ages of about 7 and 11.
      ‘junior pupils’
      • ‘These schools normally admit pupils from their junior department to senior school without sitting a further examination.’
      • ‘Most of the competitors were aged 11 to 19 but pupils from six primary schools took part in a junior section.’
      • ‘As this was during school hours, the junior members could not take part.’
      • ‘The school's new junior wing opened in January and the tree planting has now marked the end of its successful first year as a primary.’
      • ‘The trust added that junior pupils tend to be driven to school, whereas pupils at secondary school are more likely to walk or take the bus.’
      • ‘Education bosses have proposed to build the new 210-place primary school on the existing junior site by September next year, to remove 208 places at the two schools.’
      • ‘Oldfield House Unit meets the needs of junior pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties.’
      • ‘The event gives the junior pupils from primary schools in and around Appleby a taste of grammar school life.’
      • ‘More than 60 junior children from the school will be doing different activities every week for the next year.’
      • ‘A statement from the school said Mr Munro had achieved what he had set out to do, having overseen its transition from an all-age boarding school to a junior day school with a new nursery.’
      • ‘It was a fun way of returning to school after the half-term holiday for the pupils at the federated school that has its junior section at East Kennett and its infants' classes at Lockeridge.’
      • ‘The May fair raised more than £1, 500, which will help to pay for the construction of an adventure trail in the school's junior playground.’
      • ‘These sessions are also open to junior infants in primary school where it enables parents to access employment or training.’
      • ‘Parents of pupils at St Peter's Primary School, which was close to the site of the incident, were advised to pick up their children from the junior section of the school which was worst affected.’
      • ‘Almost 100 children from the junior section of the school on Edensor Road took part on Wednesday.’
      • ‘The funds were raised at the Elder Avenue school after junior pupils took part in a sponsored stay awake for 12 hours.’
      • ‘In the summer you can see almost every junior pupil on the village bowling green at an after school club.’
    2. 1.2North American Of or for students in the third year of a course lasting four years at college or high school.
      ‘his junior year in college’
      • ‘Both Mr.T and Johnny passed their junior year of College.’
      • ‘My awkward phase lasted for 9 long years and only began to whittle away during my junior year of college.’
      • ‘It helps to have lived in Tokyo for a year, as I did my junior year of college, to gain maximum enjoyment from this book.’
      • ‘Williamson, who left college after his junior year, is raw when it comes to running routes, and he had trouble catching the ball during some offseason practices.’
      • ‘Alex was their older brother, who was in his junior year in College, a whole four years older than Colleen.’
      • ‘My junior year in college, I remained in a residence hall, but my friends started moving into houses and apartments.’
      • ‘I first read this in my junior year in college, when I was studying in London for a semester.’
      • ‘They were on the road because it's during the summer after a high school player's junior year that college coaches best identify scholarship prospects.’
      • ‘Probably the best time of my life was my junior year in college, 1997, at Rice University.’
      • ‘Zimmermann married his high school sweetheart, Ann Bagsby, during his junior year at college and joined her fundamentalist Church of Christ.’
      • ‘Like him, she was lost somewhere between her sophomore and junior years of college, working full-time to pay for an apartment in the city.’
      • ‘And so, before returning to college for my junior year, I ventured up the cliff to give it a try.’
      • ‘She first visited it as a Smith College student during her junior year abroad in Geneva.’
      • ‘When I was finishing my junior year at college, I began thinking about the path I should follow after I graduated.’
      • ‘Most successful applicants will have taken at least basic journalism courses and have completed at least their junior year of college by summer 2000.’
      • ‘I asked myself this question three years ago when I attended my first convention during my junior year of college.’
      • ‘Sophomore and junior years of college, I went out with a guy named Mark.’
      • ‘My sixth and worst episode struck at the end of my junior year of college when I was overwrought about a recent breakup with a boyfriend and exhausted from school.’
      • ‘I took a Diaries and Journals class in college my junior year during the winter term.’
      • ‘During the summer before my junior year of college, my sister announced her engagement to a man she had met in college.’
    3. 1.3postpositive, in names Denoting the younger of two who have the same name in a family, especially a son as distinct from his father.
      ‘John F. Kennedy Junior’
      the younger
      View synonyms
  • 2Low or lower in rank or status.

    ‘a junior minister’
    ‘part of my function is to supervise those junior to me’
    • ‘Because that is an aspect we have understood makes staff and junior ranks very unhappy.’
    • ‘Somewhere in the junior ranks of the new government is that figure.’
    • ‘One of our most recent modules for junior hospital doctors is on the treatment of patients with status epilepticus.’
    • ‘In the Marines, he was a nobody with a silver bar, too junior to matter to staffers, too senior to fit in with the enlisted grunts his own age.’
    • ‘She has worked hard to reach her rank, and junior officers do what she tells them, she says.’
    • ‘If the top level politician remains too long in the saddle, the junior ranks may stagnate.’
    • ‘In her position as a clinical lecturer, Dr Khine would have been very junior to Professor van Velzen.’
    • ‘Much of the decline in the total number of economists was recorded in the junior ranks of associate lecturer and lecturer, although the number of male lecturers is unchanged over the four years.’
    • ‘The constant rotation of junior personnel through the ranks makes this unlikely, as does the oath of office sworn to by every soldier and officer.’
    • ‘Because you cannot necessarily always wait for a very junior rank to put themselves forward.’
    • ‘From early morning the ministers, junior ministers, TD, senators and MEPs arrived to hear how they were going to turn the Nice campaign around.’
    • ‘Her ministerial appointments amounted to only eight women, only one of whom rose higher than the ranks of junior minister.’
    • ‘But with Tony Blair and Michael Howard now representing their respective parties, he is suddenly very junior to both of his rivals.’
    • ‘I've been convinced that some of the young sergeants and junior officers never surrendered.’
    • ‘Hospitals including the Royal, City and Ulster need to achieve a quota of junior doctors to maintain their teaching status in conjunction with Queen's University.’
    • ‘Scathing reports on the surgical department then led to the surgical unit temporarily losing its training status for junior doctors.’
    • ‘Already, ministers and junior ministers must give up their council seats upon joining the Cabinet or junior minister ranks.’
    • ‘The potential gains will include former ministers, junior ministers, TDs, and existing senators and other prominent candidates.’
    • ‘The great John Dowling and so many other Kerry greats came through the junior ranks.’
    • ‘Further problems arose when the health authorities made a highly critical assessment and withdrew the surgical unit's status as a training facility for junior doctors.’
    low-ranking, lower-ranking, subordinate, sub-, lesser, lower, minor, secondary, inferior
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A person who is a specified number of years younger than someone else.

    ‘he's five years her junior’
    • ‘A reconstruction of Carlo's final moments, however, reveals he was killed by a terrified youth three years his junior.’
    • ‘Why would Summer, almost twenty years her junior, and university educated, be attracted to Bridget?’
    • ‘Most promising seemed the suggestion that he should marry Mary, queen of Scots, five years his junior, with the prospect of uniting the two kingdoms.’
    • ‘Claudia, 70, works out with a trainer, still wears killer heels and is dating a man 20 years her junior.’
    • ‘Winifred, five years his junior, moved to Keighley from Newcastle in 1933 and worked at Wolsey's wool mill.’
    • ‘Instead, children were simply held back in classes with pupils many years their junior, through what has been described as a ‘sink or swim policy’.’
    • ‘She was fifteen, nineteen years Kit's junior, when they married in 1843.’
    • ‘There she would encounter the future Queen, five years her junior, who entertained the battered troops at the piano.’
    • ‘With five marriages - the last with a guy 14 years her junior - under her garter belt, you might say Gibson doesn't believe in happily ever after.’
    • ‘Sixteen years his junior, Tamara de Lempicka made her name by her mid-twenties.’
    • ‘But this guy was alright, although I think he's probably four or five years my junior.’
    • ‘Serves him right for marrying a girl forty years his junior against her will.’
    • ‘In 1901 he married a second time, a science teacher called Evangeline Land, seventeen years his junior and the daughter of a prominent Detroit dentist.’
    • ‘Abelard was a famous teacher and Heloise, 22 years his junior.’
    • ‘Fisher, too, says that, at 47, he has been told he has the health status of someone 20 years his junior.’
    • ‘In 1966 a gate charge of 20 cents was introduced, with juniors up for five cents and those under 14 admitted free.’
    • ‘I wondered, though, how embarrassed Casey would feel about being taught by a junior; someone a year younger than him.’
    • ‘In 1891 he met Lord Alfred Douglas, a young man sixteen years his junior.’
    • ‘My sister Suzanna was two years older than me, and Philippa, the baby, was five years my junior, which meant I had to look after her a lot, when Mum, who was a chef, was on a job.’
    • ‘Her husband Lee Hall - a Geordie five years her junior who leapt to international fame writing Billy Elliot, the story of a boy ballet dancer - leads an equally frantic life.’
    1. 1.1British A child attending a junior school.
      ‘first-year juniors’
      ‘the curriculum of top juniors’
      • ‘But the money saved by not replacing the retiring head at Carlton will allow each school to afford separate teachers for infants and juniors.’
      • ‘There are prizes for two age groups - infants and juniors.’
      • ‘Aimed at infants and juniors up to year 5, the site provides fortnightly challenges.’
      • ‘In the prescribed order infants, toddlers and juniors mounted Matron, were breathed upon, exchanged whispers, and given their Christmas present.’
      • ‘But last year there were only 149 infants and 266 juniors.’
      • ‘He comes to school with his Mammy as she is teaching the juniors.’
      • ‘The inspectors recommended a partition to split the juniors from the infants or better still a separate classroom to be created.’
      • ‘The buildings will be modernised and refurbished for the 420 infants and juniors with large open teaching spaces with IT facilities.’
      • ‘Class sizes for juniors would also reduce, with an average of 25 pupils per teacher, down from the existing norm of 27.’
      • ‘Teachers, pupils and parents at Brightside Primary School are jubilant about the successes and improvements since the infants and juniors merged two years ago.’
      • ‘It brings together juniors and infants on one site, rather than a quarter of a mile apart on opposite sides of busy Bag Lane.’
      • ‘Now it's only Sunday mornings, weddings, funerals, a carol service the week before Christmas and an occasional harvest festival for the local C of E infants and juniors.’
      • ‘Only the juniors have a crossing lady, the infant school children have nothing, so please slow down.’
      • ‘Noeleen's juniors number eleven in total and are divided between junior, senior infants and second class.’
      • ‘Play facilities specially constructed to cater for juniors and toddlers will be built next to Chiltern Primary School.’
    2. 1.2North American A student in the third year at college or high school.
      with modifier ‘high-school juniors and seniors’
      • ‘I'm still wondering why he's a junior in highschool when he could be one in college!’
      • ‘On this day, Clemson offered scholarships to six high school juniors.’
      • ‘I've been coming here since I was in middle school, and I'm a junior at wonderful Carmon High School now.’
      • ‘This fall, she will be dually enrolled at Simon's Rock College as a high school junior and college freshman.’
      • ‘Wall Street 101 is open to high school juniors and seniors.’
      • ‘It targets high-school juniors whose grades don't reflect their true academic capabilities.’
      • ‘Why would he fall for introverted high school juniors?’
      • ‘He's a freshman in college and she's a junior in high-school for crying out loud.’
      • ‘This year, the high school juniors and seniors donned backpacks and rubber boots to help in a turtle conservation project.’
      • ‘All high school juniors and seniors are eligible to compete.’
      • ‘Currently, it enrolls approximately 2,500 high school juniors and seniors each year.’
      • ‘Scott and I are better, I'm a junior in high school and he's a sophomore in college.’
      • ‘One of the bloggers is a junior in high school, another is a recent college graduate.’
      • ‘Probably not, but they can successfully mix high school juniors and high school seniors in the same program.’
      • ‘It was an anthology of insightful quotes, designed mainly for juniors and seniors in high school.’
      • ‘When she was a junior in high school, she went to the local community college and took Italian and Russian for two years.’
      • ‘Choosing among programs can be quite bewildering for the rising high school junior or senior researching colleges and universities.’
      • ‘My older son Ryan was away at college while the other was home and a junior in high school.’
      • ‘There are special programs for high school juniors and seniors.’
      • ‘By May of 1999, the foundation offered two scholarship programs and intensive SAT tutoring for high school juniors and seniors.’
    3. 1.3 (in sport) a young competitor, typically under sixteen or eighteen.
      ‘indoor tennis for juniors’
      • ‘Without these juniors, league football could be finished.’
      • ‘The juniors suffered a disastrous 7-1 defeat, while the men ceded with the minimum 1-0.’
      • ‘Older juniors and adult fencers compete in the Under-16, Under-19 or Senior divisions.’
      • ‘He was at the helm in an unforgettable 1999 when the juniors went all the way to All-Ireland glory, and who is to say he won't again wave that magic wand to ensure a repeat in 2004?’
      • ‘I have seen some of our juniors compete because we've gone on a few trips and things.’
      • ‘Milltown juniors enjoyed a 1-9 to 1-5 victory away to Castledermot in the league recently.’
      • ‘And, as a junior who is two victories away from another Final Four appearance, he said it only makes him more determined to stay at Duke.’
      • ‘Now 18, though still young enough to compete as a junior, Sorrell has broken through.’
      • ‘It's the first of a number of new initiatives to improve the competition available to Britain's top club athletes, juniors and aspiring internationals.’
      • ‘The left-hander is Baseball America's 18 th-ranked prospect among juniors.’
      • ‘He added: ‘Clubs are continually trying to recruit juniors wanting to take up the sport and we can offer guidance to them.’’
      • ‘Adults train mainly for traditional karate and self defence while juniors train mainly for sport and competition.’
      • ‘So certainly with those amateurs and juniors, the administrators need to have a pretty good look at how they timetable different sports.’
      • ‘Two years before he would guide the international juniors to victory over their American counterparts with 33 points and 14 rebounds.’
      • ‘The undefeated juniors lead their group after home wins against the Czech Republic and Malta, and a draw with Denmark.’
      • ‘There is coaching for juniors each Wednesday from 3.30 p.m. to 6.30 p.m.’
      • ‘As a result of some of the initiatives undertaken by the club, some young juniors are already competing at regional events.’
      • ‘His national victory came against fellow juniors - and adults - and he also came second in the national windsurfing Under-17s slalom series.’
      • ‘The victors will parade at Lansdowne Road on the national holiday and the juniors at the same venue eleven days later.’
      • ‘A team of five seniors and three juniors will be representing the district this weekend at the NSW Country Championships in Bathurst.’
    4. 1.4North American informal Used as a nickname or form of address for one's son.
      ‘he said: ‘there's Junior,’ referring to his son’
      • ‘Just because Gramps was a great, public spirited man does not mean that junior, who has grown up with a taste for finery, will be the same.’
      • ‘The colorful PC is likely to fit junior's bedroom or playroom décor.’
      • ‘And the big toy chains are hopeful that while mom and dad may cut back on other parts of the family budget, they'll continue to splurge on toys for junior.’
      • ‘Want to send mom a DVD of junior's first Christmas?’
  • 2A person with low rank or status compared with others.

    ‘an office junior’
    • ‘Brendan started his career in retail at the L&N, Dungarvan in 1983, where he worked as a shop floor assistant and as a junior in the Goods Inward Department.’
    • ‘Doctors warn there are not enough consultants to take over from the juniors, which could in turn affect consultants' day work and therefore increase waiting times.’
    • ‘When Josie began her training juniors were expected to do the cleaning, including scrubbing the floors, and they were gradually taught hairdressing skills.’
    • ‘I applied for his job, certain that I would get it as I had been his junior for five years, and I was confident I could do the job better than anybody else within the company.’
    • ‘The drugs are collected from the pharmacy by the specialist chemotherapy nurses and handed to the consultant or to juniors in the consultant's presence.’
    • ‘Ms Gold started in her father's business as a junior at the age of 21 and rose through the ranks to become chief executive trying to take the business upmarket along the way.’
    • ‘His junior was unable to attend the court proceedings.’
    • ‘I taught it to my junior who did the Blackburn Royal Commission.’
    • ‘It should be compulsory reading for all undergraduates and hospital juniors.’
    • ‘Neither Mr Syed, the locum consultant urologist nor his junior were present.’
    • ‘A lot of experienced police officers are being bypassed for promotion while juniors are being elevated.’
    subordinate, inferior, deputy, junior, assistant, adjutant, aide, minion, lackey, flunkey, menial, retainer, vassal, subject, serf, hireling, servant, henchman, myrmidon, right-hand man, right-hand woman, girl friday, man friday, factotum, stooge
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as an adjective following a family name): from Latin, comparative of juvenis ‘young’.

Pronunciation

junior

/ˈdʒuːnɪə/