Definition of jump ship in English:

jump ship

phrase

  • (of a sailor) leave the ship on which one is serving without having obtained permission to do so.

    ‘he jumped ship in Cape Town’
    • ‘A new study has found that, despite the slower job market, employees are just as willing to quit their job now than they were at the height of the boom years, when jumping ship seemed like a monthly option for some workers.’
    • ‘Escaping poverty, they simply jumped ship after docking in New York or San Francisco.’
    • ‘Throughout the 19th century a steady trickle of lascars - sailors from Africa, China and the Malay archipelago who manned British trading vessels - had been jumping ship as soon as they docked in London.’
    • ‘When the Dutch Fleet visited Australia in 1910 a large number of sailors jumped ship and at least twelve of them later settled in Adelaide.’
    • ‘With unemployment at its highest point in nearly a decade, workers lucky enough to avoid layoffs have had little opportunity to jump ship.’
    • ‘He stows away on a Portugal-bound ship, has qualms about the reception that might await him, and jumps ship at St. Helena.’
    • ‘She's been feeling a bit low lately after a messy break-up, and I get the impression that things have been a bit stressful for her at work, with layoffs and people jumping ship.’
    • ‘Anstey stowed away at the age of 11, jumped ship in Sydney and spent 10 years as a seaman.’
    • ‘He was a hard drinker and a staunch trade unionist who came to Australia as a stoker in 1910 and jumped ship.’
    • ‘So, when we got to Istanbul, we broke into the equipment locker, jumped ship, stole a bus and headed off to Incirlik Airbase on the Black Sea.’