Main definitions of juju in English

: juju1juju2

juju1

noun

  • [mass noun] A style of music popular among the Yoruba in Nigeria and characterized by the use of guitars and variable-pitch drums.

    • ‘Like Fela, he's politically outspoken and, like Sunny, he paints in bright colours - highlife and juju meet modern funkiness.’
    • ‘Perhaps Nigeria's most popular form of music is juju, which uses traditional drums and percussion instruments to back up vocals and complicated guitar work.’
    • ‘Like a great one-man show, Rux channels the multi-hued flavors of the diaspora, filtering his fiercely proud and thoughtful verses through African juju, avant-jazz and hip-hop.’
    • ‘Then came the '70s with West African juju and high life music whose main purveyors were the Osibisa, Manu Dibango and late Fela Anikulapo Kuti.’
    • ‘The multifaceted man of mystery might mask his identity, but there's no hiding the vivacious grooves woven into his blend of highlife, juju, R&B and a touch of rock.’

Origin

Perhaps from Yoruba jo jo dance.

Pronunciation:

juju

/ˈdʒuːdʒuː/

Main definitions of juju in English

: juju1juju2

juju2

noun

  • 1A charm or fetish, especially of a type used by some West African peoples.

    • ‘These Sun jujus are made from recycled mardi gras beads based on a spiritcatcher/voodoo doll; hang this juju in a window near a door and it will help ward off evil spirits from your home or workplace.’
    • ‘Some people carry jujus around with them all of which have been blessed by a Priest or Priestess to keep them safe.’
    juju, talisman, charm, amulet
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[mass noun]Supernatural power attributed to a charm or fetish.
      ‘juju and witchcraft’
      • ‘He said although Mulozyi had earlier indicated that he would use juju and turned up in the ring with some fetishes, the fight was allowed to go on because they thought it was mere psychological warfare.’
      • ‘Just as he has repeated encounters with juju that leave him open-mouthed, he has encounters with the loss of communal life that both imperialism and Western religion have caused.’
      • ‘After a horrible storm or war, or anytime a lot of people die, is there some sort of bad vibe or negative juju imprinted on the landscape?’
      • ‘But for some it was an exercise in calming the nerves as the belief in the power of muti or juju set in.’
      • ‘No matter what sort of threat a politician is, usurping free will is pretty bad juju, as least as far as I understand things.’

Origin

Early 17th century: of West African origin, perhaps from French joujou toy.

Pronunciation:

juju

/ˈdʒuːdʒuː/