Definition of joint in English:

joint

noun

  • 1A point at which parts of an artificial structure are joined.

    ‘seal the joint between the roof and the house wall’
    • ‘The joint between the door frame and the exterior and interior walls can be as much as an eighth of an inch gap.’
    • ‘Builders are often sloppy with the mortar joints between bricks when they know they will be hidden behind plaster.’
    • ‘The counter flashing, which overlaps the base flashing, is imbedded and sealed in the chimney's masonry joints.’
    • ‘He noted that the mortar joint between the top of the brick and the underside of the plate was solid.’
    • ‘The thickness of perpend and bed joints varies considerably, and perpend joints do not line up.’
    • ‘The door is made with simple but strong half-lap joints, using just a few basic hand tools and a circular saw.’
    • ‘For outdoor use, most manufacturers recommend that the joints be sealed with a non-acidic silicone glue.’
    • ‘Set the tiles using plastic spacers to maintain desired grout joints.’
    • ‘Splits are also common at joints within the expansion joint cover itself.’
    • ‘Or, you can seal the joint with duct tape placed lengthwise all along the seams and end joints.’
    • ‘For any other grout joints with other types of tiles we would use a sanded grout which holds up better when the grout lines are wider.’
    • ‘Tape the joints with drywall tape and finish the patch with joint compound.’
    • ‘The most effective joints for moisture resistance are concave, v-shaped, and weathered joints.’
    • ‘The mortar joints between the bricks also have their own color and texture.’
    • ‘Look for loose joints or other structural problems with the system, and repair them as needed using pop rivets.’
    • ‘The new content includes masonry anchors, control joints and roof copings.’
    • ‘Seal joints between the wall and your new tub with silicone caulk as protection against water seepage.’
    • ‘After old caulk is removed, new caulk can then be applied to all joints in the window frame and the joint between the frame and the wall.’
    • ‘If the color isn't acceptable, we'd suggest you seal just the joints using a foam paintbrush to apply the material.’
    • ‘Then run the round part of your hammer handle or screwdriver shank tightly up the joint to seal any gap that may be left.’
    join, junction, juncture, intersection, link, linkage, connection, nexus
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A particular arrangement of parts of a structure at the point where they are joined.
      ‘members connected together by rigid joints’
      • ‘He soon knew every inch of the 1400 parts of the bridge and spent years filing the multitude of dovetail joints which hold the construction together.’
      • ‘Thanks to a new joint and crossbar arrangement for the car's load-bearing structure, the bodyshell stiffness is increased by 25 percent over its predecessor.’
    2. 1.2Geology A break or fracture in a mass of rock, with no relative displacement of the parts.
      • ‘Some of these master joints continue over the surface for hundreds of metres.’
      • ‘Where the original rock had been Grade II or better, this had resulted in the rock being fractured and in joints being opened.’
      • ‘Subsurface evidence from drilling shows that these folds were fractured intensively by small-scale faults and closely spaced joints.’
      • ‘Another fracture system consists of relief-related joints.’
      • ‘Fluorite-quartz intergrowths fill veins that follow high-angle en echelon joints and minor faults in granite.’
    3. 1.3 A piece of flexible material forming the hinge of a book cover.
  • 2A structure in the human or animal body at which two parts of the skeleton are fitted together.

    ‘she suffers from stiff joints and finds bending difficult’
    • ‘Pathogenic cold may also cause a common cold with symptoms of sore aching joints and headache.’
    • ‘The shoulder is a ball and socket joint and the most mobile joint in the human body.’
    • ‘An artificial hip joint consists of three parts, the ball, the bearing and the cup.’
    • ‘Like those of the shoulder, hip and knee joint replacement rates are only increasing.’
    • ‘The symphysis pubis is the joint that connects the two coxal bones at this area.’
    • ‘Her right leg is wasted and her knee joint is swollen, shiny and huge in comparison to the other.’
    • ‘Then follow with some easy stretching to warm the joints, muscles and connective tissue.’
    • ‘Cortisone remarkably relieved inflamed, swollen joints after just a few days of use.’
    • ‘To help his recovery, Johnson had injections in December to lubricate the joint.’
    • ‘The ligaments are tissues that connect the bones at the joints.’
    • ‘In addition to being held together by ligaments, synovial joints are also stabilized by the muscles around the joints.’
    • ‘She presented with a history of a painful right ankle joint since childhood with no history of injury.’
    • ‘The soft tissue structures around the joint play a vital role in the stability of the shoulder.’
    • ‘Tantalum is used for sutures, and steel in artificial hip joints.’
    • ‘The exercise will move stiff shoulder joints and stretch muscles in the waist.’
    • ‘You may feel very hot and have painful inflamed joints.’
    • ‘His elbow and shoulder joints ache, but he still labors through the workouts.’
    • ‘Our results showed that beginners were characterized by strong couplings between the joints of the lower limbs.’
    • ‘First of all, because the body produces higher levels of hormones, the connective tissues around the joints soften.’
    • ‘The most freely moving joints are the synovial joints.’
    articulation
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Each of the distinct sections of a body or limb between the places at which they are connected.
      ‘the top two joints of his index finger’
      • ‘Cut at an angle to create shapes the length of the first joint of your index finger.’
      • ‘You want to be able to get the distal joint of your trigger finger onto the trigger.’
    2. 2.2British A large piece of meat cooked whole or ready for cooking.
      ‘a joint of ham’
      • ‘Lukoszevieze brandishes a meat cleaver and brings it down on a substantial joint of meat.’
      • ‘Meat pies, joints of mutton, and other hearty foods are most likely to be served.’
      • ‘West Country lambs are particularly large, and the joint is packed with meat all the way to the top of the chop.’
      • ‘Large pieces of tuna may be braised like joints of meat.’
      • ‘If you have ever hacked into a joint of meat you will know it is difficult to cut through bone.’
      • ‘Large meat joints or whole poultry need special care.’
      • ‘It's Christmas, the joint of beef is on trial, and you are about to make the best gravy of your life.’
      • ‘A few minutes earlier I had placed a basketball-sized joint of beef in the fork of a tree five feet off the ground.’
      • ‘Large stew pans, shown full of joints of meat, had straight sides and flat bases.’
      • ‘Half-past one on the dot, after my dad had returned from the pub, the joint of meat would be ceremoniously carved.’
      • ‘The key to successful spit-roasting is to keep the coals at an even temperature, placing more coals, little and often, until the joint is cooked.’
      • ‘The Italians had a great idea when they hit upon the idea of cooking joints of meat and pasta in the same pot.’
      • ‘These included not only the normal range of meat joints and poultry, but also whole cattle and sheep.’
      • ‘And since the joint of meat was large enough to feed a family several times over, there was almost a routine to the week's menus.’
      • ‘For me, an ideal meal would be a joint of lamb cooked in the Aga at home, with plenty of fresh vegetables from my garden.’
      • ‘Jane was in the kitchen cooking a joint of beef ready for when Daddy got home.’
      • ‘And then I plainly saw, both with wonder and delight that the joint of meat did, in some places, shine like rotten wood or stinking fish.’
      • ‘Turn the meat and cook until the joint is evenly browned and crusted all over.’
      • ‘Deglaze with the sherry vinegar and cook until reduced by half, then return the pork joint to the pan.’
      • ‘She would get a huge joint of beef or lamb for about two shillings and they would put 2lb of sausages in for free.’
    3. 2.3 The part of a stem of a plant from which a leaf or branch grows.
      ‘cut just below a leaf joint’
      • ‘Make a cut below a leaf joint and dip the cutting in hormone rooting powder before inserting it into an open peat-free compost and perlite mix.’
      • ‘First remove several stems about the thickness of a pencil from the shrub and trim them to a length of around 30 cm just below a leaf joint.’
      • ‘Trim the cutting just below a leaf joint and dip the end in rooting hormone powder or liquid.’
      • ‘Take plenty to allow for any failures and trim each one just below a leaf joint so the cutting is about 10 cm long.’
      • ‘Always make the base cut of your cutting below a node or leaf joint.’
      • ‘Cut back a few inches to within 1/8 inch of a leaf joint.’
      • ‘Helxine soleirolii (mind-your-own-business) looks like a fragile weed but it spreads by rooting at the leaf joints.’
      • ‘After flowering, if there are no ornamental seed heads, the flowering stems may be cut back to a leaf joint to remove the faded flowers.’
      • ‘Like all grasses, sugar cane has a jointed stem, and its leaves and branches come from the shoots at each joint.’
      • ‘Using a sharp, clean knife or clippers, cut the tip of a side shoot that has at least three leaf joints.’
      • ‘The underground and aboveground stems send out roots from each joint.’
    4. 2.4 A section of a plant stem between two joints; an internode.
      • ‘It acts perpendicular to the cross section of the joint.’
      • ‘For this study as with previous studies, stem joints were defined as the smallest diameter region between two successive stem segments.’
      • ‘Prune last year's growth back to two or three joints or buds from the base.’
      • ‘Sometimes your older, established plants will have roots already growing from the segment joints.’
  • 3informal An establishment of a specified kind, especially one where people meet for eating, drinking, or entertainment.

    ‘a burger joint’
    • ‘Enjoy lunch from the best fast-food joint in town - your kitchen!’
    • ‘It's funky, she says, and not a theme park or a burger joint, and the food is good.’
    • ‘Besides, familiar faces from the silver screen and even the small screen, there will be a lot of glitterati at these burger joints.’
    • ‘One of the stores was a burger joint based on Al, the big-nosed restaurateur of ‘Happy Days’ fame.’
    • ‘Swing originated in the juke joints and rent parties of Kansas City, Chicago and Harlem.’
    • ‘In the wild, snakes are as ubiquitous as fast-food joints in a city.’
    • ‘We all decided to go to another burger joint in town.’
    • ‘Harpo learns how to live alone, and builds a juke joint in their old home.’
    • ‘Outlaws is a big club hidden behind mattress warehouses and burger joints.’
    • ‘Bars and juke joints have given way to day-care centers and fast-food joints.’
    • ‘But such attention to detail seemed to clash with a laminated menu, which made me think of tacky burger joints and sad little cafes.’
    • ‘The warm couple who run the joint reserves a section for celebrity habitués, although these are nowadays outnumbered by the varieties of soup.’
    • ‘One of the most mouth-watering of their creations is the oily chili sauce that covers the joint's bite-sized dumplings.’
    • ‘How can I insist she keep working at burger joints and fund-raiser telethons?’
    • ‘They plant the seed of a revolutionary idea for the hamburger joint - a drive-through window like those found in banks.’
    • ‘The pub city has taken a hit with the 11.30 pm deadline imposed by the Police Department on entertainment joints.’
    • ‘For proof, check out the entertainment joints springing up across the city.’
    • ‘The furniture is composed of pink and blue plastic, the sort of material only found in fast food joints.’
    • ‘Bloggers are blessedly uninfected by the musty Establishmentarian Air that permeates joints like Elaine's.’
    • ‘As the number of entertainment joints in the resort has skyrocketed in the last three years, punters are increasingly choosy.’
    establishment, restaurant, bar, club, nightclub
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1the jointNorth American Prison.
      • ‘Mr. X's drawing of the joint was not so much useless as directed at a different objective.’
      • ‘And unlike the joint in Indy where boxing was a no-no, the jail in Cali specializes in fights between hardened criminals.’
      • ‘Such is life in the big house, the joint, or the pokey.’
      • ‘The world is out of joint, so why bother plastering?’
  • 4informal A cannabis cigarette.

    ‘he rolled a joint’
    • ‘They have also stated that cannabis is in fact less addictive, and less carcinogenic than the tobacco used to roll the joints.’
    • ‘He admitted being ‘stoned’ after smoking two or three joints of cannabis, which he claimed affected his judgment.’
    • ‘Dr Corrigan said the crucial factor was the combination of cannabis and tobacco in joints resulting in ‘the worst of both worlds’.’
    • ‘But Njoh was spotted smoking a cannabis joint at the carnival and was stopped and searched by police.’
    • ‘Many of the anti-dope medical trials have been totally flawed because they focused on people smoking cannabis joints containing tobacco.’
    • ‘Nick had been silently moving around the room, gathering cigarettes and joints.’
    • ‘I felt the best thing to do would be to learn to roll joints, and buy my own cannabis.’
    • ‘Every day after school, she'd smoke a joint of marijuana and then proceeded to prank call my house.’
    • ‘I have smoked some joints, of course, especially during my crisis period.’
    • ‘But smoking a cannabis joint is not the same as smoking a normal cigarette.’
    • ‘Last November, Ming sent cannabis joints to Dáil politicians through the post.’
    • ‘Blue rolls another joint and the air grows sweeter.’
    • ‘She pulled a joint out of her cigarette box and looked around to make sure nobody was watching.’
    • ‘Anyone caught carrying up to 500 cannabis joints is likely to escape trafficking charges under Home Office proposals published yesterday.’
    • ‘He made a good deal of money turning the plants into joints, and selling them to the local teenagers.’
    • ‘He didn't normally smoke cigarettes, only joints, but this was not a normal moment, so he took one.’
    • ‘Benjamin said that they drove in Chris' car to Savernake Forest where between them they had smoked two or three cannabis joints.’
    • ‘With that she rips a piece off the page and uses it for her joint.’
    • ‘They think they can walk around town smoking a joint and nothing will happen.’
    • ‘Here a man was sent to jail for possessing enough cannabis to make 2 joints.’
    cannabis cigarette, marijuana cigarette
    View synonyms
  • 5US informal A piece of creative work, especially a musical recording.

    ‘listen to one of his joints nowadays and you don't even need to see the production credit’
    • ‘There was a sense of future that was the result of the mixture of politics, cinema, music, the first joints.’

adjective

  • 1attributive Shared, held, or made by two or more people together.

    ‘a joint statement’
    • ‘The trio's new joint venture intends to bid for other inter-city rail franchises in Britain.’
    • ‘For example, if a husband and wife have an estate worth £500,000, they could take a joint share in their house and divide their investments.’
    • ‘The Polish Government came to the rescue through a joint shipping company to transport materials China needed.’
    • ‘Profits from the new joint venture will be shared by ADM and Farmland.’
    • ‘The Memorandum contemplated joint custody with Evan having his primary residence with Ms Howey.’
    • ‘When the house is in joint ownership, a will can ensure that the surviving spouse will inherit only a right of occupancy.’
    • ‘In a joint statement, they described his action as a " betrayal".’
    • ‘Onward movement is accomplished when joint forces leave the staging area and move to assigned areas of operation.’
    • ‘The work was done on the property for the benefit of the two owners as joint tenants.’
    • ‘We have managed to reconcile all of our major disagreements, and we present this as a truly joint text.’
    • ‘Make joint custody a reality instead of a meaningless scrap of paper.’
    • ‘A joint communique is also expected to be signed.’
    • ‘Legal title to the property was taken by the parties as joint tenants.’
    • ‘However, the new joint agreement with Fujitsu covering the development of future Solaris servers really grabs the attention.’
    • ‘The joint statement specifically named Taiwan as a mutual security concern for the first time.’
    • ‘Mr. Ladisa seeks an order for joint custody of all three of his children.’
    • ‘When joint custody works well, a child has a sense of balance and unity.’
    • ‘That bank building will house a branch as well as joint headquarters functions.’
    • ‘A couple wanting to buy the same house would need a joint income of more than £60,000.’
    • ‘There was a joint satellite session each day with speakers, panelists, question-and-answer sessions, and workshops in each city.’
    common, shared, communal, collective, corporate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Sharing in a position, achievement, or activity.
      ‘a joint winner’
      • ‘However, opportunities for more formalized joint sessions on a regular basis might be explored.’
      • ‘Once it has been established that the local infrastructures of two cities support joint activities and projects, the hard work starts.’
      • ‘He cannot therefore be liable as a joint tortfeasor with the company.’
      • ‘U.S. military activities include joint exercises, training, and active arms sales to rich Arab Gulf states.’
      • ‘Drafters of the roadmap also hope to encourage collaboration by funding more joint research.’
      • ‘Three years later, he became joint managing director with finance director Tom Jenkinson.’
      • ‘The pension companies will come up with a joint position on their participation in the pension reform.’
      • ‘The weak points of each school become apparent when joint practices are held.’
      • ‘Perhaps we were still a bit dehydrated but nothing could take away the feeling of euphoria we had at our joint achievement.’
      • ‘The memorandum said that maximising the benefits of joint activities in the areas of investment and re-equipment would be a key focus for both.’
      • ‘The award is a joint achievement by everyone at the site and I'm tremendously proud of every single employee.’
      • ‘It has Sweden and Greece in joint favourites position, at 7-1, followed by Doran at 8-1.’
      • ‘The pool itself will be linked to the activity zone with a joint reception.’
      • ‘They say the two governments have agreed a joint position, bar a spot of fine-tuning on key issues like policing, and this in itself is a major achievement.’
      • ‘They spent time at each other's houses and went on joint holidays.’
      • ‘Another objective of the report is securing greater and continued support from the trade for joint tourism development activity.’
      • ‘Marie is bringing her accounting skills to help the finance management of the club and takes up the position of joint treasurer.’
      • ‘A large centre in the same city co-ordinates joint business activities.’
      • ‘I support joint activities with our ally when it is proper or expedient to do so (and especially when it is both proper and expedient).’
      • ‘Most of the joint task force positions will earn joint-duty credit depending on actual length of rotation, officials said.’
    2. 1.2Law Applied or regarded together.
      Often contrasted with several
      • ‘In a joint statement the couple described their break-up as " a very tough decision".’
      • ‘In any event, the RVP samples tested by Mr Cooper are properly to be regarded as the joint property of AIC and Mobil.’
      • ‘Joint tenancy is joint ownership and possession of the same property.’
      • ‘In a joint statement both parties said that their High Court dispute had been " settled amicably".’
      • ‘The history of this is in fact set out in the joint judgment of Justices Gummow and Hayne in Angas Law Services.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Provide or fasten (something) with joints.

    ‘jointed lever arms’
    • ‘Traditional timber buildings in Bhutan are jointed together using no steel fasteners.’
    • ‘The hide will have to be jointed, preferably under the hand grip.’
    • ‘Alicia exclaimed, ‘Do you think that we're double jointed!’’
    • ‘The students rev faster as we thump across the unevenly jointed highway.’
    • ‘Nitrogen should be applied by April 15 or before jointing.’
    • ‘The one bit I didn't enjoy was the double jointed contortionist, who actually dislocated his shoulder and elbow on stage.’
    • ‘Other dolls, Lily and Jane, made in Germany, had jointed arms and legs, eyelashes, eyes that opened and shut and real hair.’
    • ‘The industry defines collectible teddy bears as hard, not floppy, and fully jointed (meaning arms, legs, and head are moveable).’
    • ‘Made of 2in-thick slabs of precisely jointed oak, it spirals up, entirely self-supporting, without even a central pillar.’
    • ‘Most common rules were available in either boxwood or ivory and were jointed and trimmed with either brass or German silver.’
    1. 1.1 Fill up the joints of (masonry or brickwork) with mortar; point.
      • ‘However, the gill arches seem to be jointed and they appear to be closely related to paired fin-folds on the anaspid model.’
      • ‘Tightly jointed stonework complements the house's crisp lines and ties it to the site, part of a former farm.’
      • ‘All parking lots must be jointed, with the joint spacing depending on the pavement thickness.’
      • ‘Possible tell-tale signs in this connection is any evidence of algae staining/open jointed brickwork to the rear, adjacent to such fixed pipes.’
      • ‘The walls are columnar jointed and aphanitic, and internally the massive core is texturally zoned.’
      • ‘At the precipice of the roof, a stairwell circled its way to the bottom floor, where it jointed itself to a room that was probably once a bar.’
      • ‘The second seems to have a similar simple verticality when seen through the portal, but within the room shows itself to be jointed and angled.’
    2. 1.2 Prepare (a board) for being joined to another by planing its edge.
      • ‘Self-bows are those which are made fully of wood, either a single stave, or a pair of shorter staves, usually jointed at the handle, giving a single length.’
      • ‘As I set about planing, jointing, gluing and sanding the pieces, I also began a creative argument with the wood.’
      • ‘You can use a router to cut mortises for hardware, to joint and trim lumber, to create recesses for decorative inlays, and much more.’
      • ‘Be certain that the edges are properly jointed with no space between the boards.’
      • ‘The timbers are often cut and dressed by hand, jointed and interlocked in the traditional way, and fastened throughout with wood pegs.’
  • 2Cut (the body of an animal) into joints for cooking.

    ‘use a sharp knife to joint the bird’
    • ‘If cattle are removed at jointing, there will be very little yield loss.’
    • ‘Patterns of jointing meat vary between countries depending on the methods favoured for cookery.’
    • ‘Having found a butcher to joint it we started to skin it but we then discovered its problems - a missing front foot and a stinking gangrenous shoulder.’
    • ‘The jointed body was pinned to itself in a sort of fold.’
    • ‘He sends his fat cattle to a local butcher to be slaughtered and jointed, then sells the meat.’
    cut up, chop up, butcher, carve
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • out of joint

    • 1(of a joint of the body) out of position; dislocated.

      ‘he put his hip out of joint’
      • ‘Jacob wrestled with the angel until the angel put his hip out of joint.’
      • ‘She pulls it hard enough to put it out of joint, but does not break it.’
      • ‘However, his comeback was accompanied by a 90 percent chance the shoulder would pop out of joint again.’
      • ‘He rolled off to one side, and was trying to rise, but his arm had been put out of joint at the shoulder in the fall.’
      • ‘I am in discomfort all the time and my hip keeps popping out of joint so I have to wiggle it back in.’
      • ‘The injury has progressed to the point that the heads can dislocate or come out of joint.’
      • ‘For, as with Sutton, Petrov has put a few noses out of joint with his match-winning interventions this season.’
      • ‘I've managed to pull my hip out of joint somehow and have stabbing pains when I stand up.’
      1. 1.1In a state of disorder or disorientation.
        ‘time was thrown completely out of joint’
        • ‘A group of fruit trees in this work becomes a hideous metaphor for a world out of joint.’
        • ‘The angles are out of joint, the proportions irregular, the sky stained by blotches; still the birds flutter along in meditation.’
        • ‘The poets seem to be ethnographers, slightly out of joint.’
        • ‘Confucius finds himself in an age in which values are out of joint.’
        • ‘Similarly out of joint is the notion that Rachel's example in Genesis 30 would be taken by fundamentalists as justification for concubinage.’
        • ‘The modern world, as BT portrays it, is out of joint.’
        • ‘But there is something collectively out of joint in European culture, if rhetoric like this really resonates with the public.’
        • ‘The things they describe are not integral to the story, and the language of the descriptions is forced and somehow out of joint.’
        • ‘Highly trained sniffer dogs used to detect explosives could have their snouts put out of joint by pioneering chemical research.’
        • ‘The time, and the medium, seem out of joint for such productions.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, past participle of joindre ‘to join’ (see join).

Pronunciation

joint

/dʒɔɪnt/