Definition of jog in English:

jog

verb

  • 1no object Run at a steady gentle pace, especially on a regular basis as a form of physical exercise.

    ‘he began to jog along the road’
    ‘right now she is jogging two miles a day’
    • ‘And he took off jogging in the direction of the kennels.’
    • ‘When I opened the door, I started jogging lightly up the stairs.’
    • ‘At the gym, Megan started off by walking and jogging on the treadmill for 30 minutes.’
    • ‘Paul jogged down the corridor trying to find his way to the emergency meeting point.’
    • ‘I jogged on the spot, making a futile attempt to slow my heart beat.’
    • ‘Without another word, Meg jogged off down the hallway.’
    • ‘If you can't exercise or jog for 20 minutes, simply go as far as you can.’
    • ‘Sivan had to nearly jog to keep up with the contingent of brood warriors.’
    • ‘"Goodnight Kurt, " she smiled, and then jogged out to the car.’
    • ‘I grabbed a ratty towel from the outhouse bathroom and jogged away in the direction of the creek.’
    • ‘He put the six pack on the ground, and started jogging back down the hallway.’
    • ‘I think I'm gonna go outside and jog for 5 minutes.’
    • ‘Waving, he jogged off down the hallway in the opposite direction, leaving me gaping like a fish.’
    • ‘I swirled around to face him and saw as he jogged up to catch up with me.’
    • ‘She jogged down the hall, her eyes blazing somewhere between anger and relief.’
    • ‘The two jogged for the next few minutes before Rilke floated over.’
    • ‘And then, to my even greater astonishment, he turns and starts jogging back up the stairs.’
    • ‘Mike jogged up the steps close behind her, refusing to be left alone.’
    • ‘Digging his keys out of his pocket, he jogged lightly up the last few steps.’
    • ‘Eight minutes later, Erica came jogging down the corridor to where they were.’
    run slowly, jogtrot, dogtrot, trot, lope
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a horse) move at a slow trot.
      ‘they caught and saddled their horses and jogged up to the high grass moorland’
      • ‘With his ears up and his eyes bright, Hold That Tiger completed the drill after earlier jogging once around the track.’
      • ‘He jogged his horse back over to the class as Zeya walked Feoi out of the ring and headed toward the other group.’
      • ‘They got my five-year-old daughter sitting and turning all the way around while the horse was jogging.’
      • ‘The rider may be leaning forward or using too much leg, which will cause the horse to jog faster.’
      • ‘Red Bullet is expected to jog for the next ten days and begin galloping at the beginning of October.’
      • ‘Horses Wednesday mainly galloped, jogged, or walked, but the first official workouts are most likely to occur on Thursday.’
      • ‘They walk and jog clockwise on the far outside of the rail, and they canter and gallop counter-clockwise along the inside rail.’
      • ‘In the Western Pleasure classes, horses must walk, jog and lope on the rail each direction, stop, and back willingly.’
    2. 1.2 Move in an unsteady way.
      ‘the bus jogged and jolted’
      • ‘Shake stacked sieves, vibrating, jogging, and jolting them to keep the sand in continuous motion for two minutes.’
      • ‘A removable battery cover may jolt a hard drive unacceptably when jogging, albeit imperceptibly to the user.’
      • ‘In an almost jogging rhythm, the song quickly turned into a ballad in which the audience was serenaded by the saxophone.’
      jolt, lurch, bump, bang, rattle, bounce, shake
      View synonyms
  • 2with object Nudge or knock slightly.

    ‘a hand jogged his elbow’
    • ‘One evening, he jogged her arm accidentally and spilt some tea on her sari.’
    • ‘I think he'll be a better candidate if he's jogged, nudged, challenged.’
    • ‘On one occasion Chapman glowed with nostalgia, took a deep pull on his pipe, and jogged his narcoleptic friend's arm.’
    • ‘Angela notices my look and jogs my elbow a little.’
    nudge, prod, poke, push, elbow, tap
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A spell of jogging.

    ‘his morning jog’
    • ‘Then she changes into workout clothes and we head out for a morning jog.’
    • ‘One day while doing his morning jog he was hit by a train.’
    • ‘After a quick bite to eat I go for a 20 minute jog followed by an hour and a half of weight training.’
    • ‘He has his diamonds and ankle weights on and he's going for a jog.’
    • ‘Pradeep's fitness regime on most days includes a morning jog of at least seven km and a balanced diet with plenty of proteins and fluids.’
    • ‘After my morning jog, I felt ready to face the day.’
    • ‘Thoughts of Dara kept him awake most of the night, and if that wasn't bad enough, even his morning jog failed to invigorate him.’
    • ‘My mother came back from her jog just as I was exiting the yard.’
    • ‘It was early enough so that there were very few tourists around, and the people who could be seen were like us, out for a morning jog or power walk.’
    • ‘He is up at 5.30 a.m. for a jog and a 30-minute workout in the gym.’
    • ‘She was asking him where she could go for a jog in the morning.’
    • ‘I have to head off and buy a new pair of boots and take a morning jog.’
    • ‘Still breathing heavy from her brisk, morning jog, she sauntered into the kitchen for a bottle of water.’
    • ‘Joan smirked as she paced herself during her morning jog.’
    • ‘If your evenings are in the bar or out clubbing then forget leaping out of bed for a quick jog in the morning!’
    • ‘It was coincidentally a really nice morning and she was going out for her daily morning jog.’
    • ‘Before leaving for her morning jog, Jessica gives the girl a quick hug.’
    • ‘Blake would usually be outside doing an early morning jog.’
    • ‘Brijesh occasionally met people on his morning jog.’
    • ‘Take him on a vigorous run or jog in the morning before you leave.’
    sprint, race, dash, gallop, rush, spurt
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1in singular A gentle running pace.
      ‘he set off along the bank at a jog’
      • ‘In particular, consumers are up and running again, although perhaps at more of a jog than a sprint.’
      • ‘At the sight of this event, the opponent became worried and quickened his pace into nearly a jog.’
      • ‘He sighed with relief and slowed his sprint to a jog.’
      • ‘Her face automatically brightened and her pace increased into a jog.’
      • ‘As he quickened his pace to a jog, he saw a swift shape dart up a curling stairway.’
      • ‘We started out at a jog, trying to warm up and pace ourselves.’
      • ‘I still had that jumpy, energetic feeling I'd had that morning, so I started off at a jog in the direction of Andy's house.’
      • ‘He heard the bell ring for the last 200m, kicked, and slowed to a jog after crossing the finish line in first.’
      • ‘A thumping in the distance made him tense with fear and he slowed his pace to a jog.’
      • ‘Trek mounted up and worked 18 year old Anni into a warm-up jog towards the trail on the hill.’
      • ‘Tears were falling down her face as her jog turned into a sprint.’
      • ‘Suddenly, Urlacher steps over one of the fences, breaks into a jog down an embankment and on to the field.’
      • ‘He picks up the pace to what would be a comfortable jog for him, but in reality, a really, really painstakingly fast run for me.’
      • ‘She broke out into a jog and rushed towards the man nearing the comic store.’
      • ‘Feeling better, Noca increased her pace to a jog.’
      • ‘But all of a sudden you realized, the jog became a sprint, and he wasn't slowing down.’
      • ‘In fact, she almost seemed to increase her pace to a jog, with Becky following suit a moment after her.’
      • ‘Even though she was running flat out, Seung was able to keep up with her pace at a brisk jog.’
      • ‘Then he went after her, exchanging his usual loping gait for a jog.’
      • ‘She approached it cautiously, slowing her pace down to a jog.’
      run, jogtrot, dogtrot, trot, lope
      View synonyms
  • 2A slight push or nudge.

    ‘he gave her a jog with his elbow’
    poke, dig in the ribs, dig, prod, jab, butt, push
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • jog someone's memory

    • Cause someone to remember something suddenly.

      ‘I wanted to see if the clothes would jog her memory’
      • ‘I just hope this jogs someone else's memory, because he may have asked others for directions.’
      • ‘Several old photos that have been published in the ‘Western People’ have jogged many memories of that old line.’
      • ‘Police issued a picture of a similar Subaru Impreza, a WRX model worth about £26,000, in a bid to jog people's memories.’
      • ‘She then jogged his memory that they had a cat named Jack.’
      • ‘It jogged my memory and I remembered an article I had read in a Sunday Observer sometime earlier this year, say in March or April.’
      • ‘But if that information gets out, can't that help jog some people's memories in the public and help this investigation?’
      • ‘Our petrolhead talk, however, has jogged his memory and he suddenly interrupts himself.’
      • ‘Today, officers are due to flood the West Swindon shopping centre to canvas passers-by in the hope of jogging the public's memory.’
      • ‘I had two encounters that jogged my memory about memory.’
      • ‘Something laughed outside the door, a poisonous sound that suddenly jogged his memory and mind.’
      stimulate, prompt, stir, activate, arouse
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • jog along

    • Continue in a steady, uneventful way.

      ‘our marriage worked and we jogged along’
      • ‘If a club doesn't have a long term plan then it can become directionless and just jog along or, worse, slip backwards.’
      • ‘Low long-term interest rates keep the recovery jogging along.’
      • ‘If nothing else, the song jogs along to a fun, poppy beat.’
      • ‘Not for him the calm certainties of jogging along with the mainstream church; he constantly sought certainty, even if it was of a negative kind.’
      • ‘Business jogged along nicely for a decade.’
      • ‘We are a positive advertisement for just jogging along, not rocking too many boats, not getting over-excited.’
      • ‘After an 'incident' we jog along, sometimes for quite long periods, before there is a feeling of growing tension and I know there is going to be another outburst, after which the sequence repeats itself.’
      • ‘Clearly there was enough cooperation to allow the system to jog along - but not enough to satisfy higher authorities.’
      • ‘While the Premiership was dominated by United and Arsenal the pair could jog along at home before Christmas, keeping an eye on each other but keeping most of their powder dry for the group stages.’
      • ‘In subsequent political regimes in France, one virtually constant factor has been a determination to separate the church from the state, simply to ensure that citizens can manage to jog along together.’
      continue, proceed, go, go on, carry on
      View synonyms
  • jog on

    • 1Continue in a steady, uneventful way.

      ‘Phelps's life jogged on in this fashion until spring’
      • ‘The couple jogged on without quarrelling for about three years.’
      • ‘It can do much to alleviate children's pessimism about future prospects of happiness if they have godparents who are still jogging on cosily together.’
      • ‘Things jogged on like this for the next nine to ten years.’
      • ‘The festival season jogs on, and next weekend the Welsh hillsides will echo to the sounds of Dexys, Mogwai, Van Morrison, Metronomy, Feist, Scritti Politti and dozens of others.’
      • ‘She went back to live with her sister in Croydon, and things jogged on much the same as ever at home.’
    • 2usually in imperativeGo away (used as expression of anger or irritation)

      ‘I really want to go and see the show but for an £8.75 booking fee they can jog on!’
      • ‘Jog on, you're boring me.’
      • ‘Seems like you finally did what I told you to do and jogged on.’
      • ‘Jog on, you muppets, leave them alone!’
      • ‘If he is released in 21 years, there will be uproar - I hope they tell the EU to jog on.’
      • ‘Why don't you all just jog on and let somebody run things properly.’
      • ‘Do yourself and everyone else a favour, and just jog on, sonny.’
      • ‘Jog on mate!’
      • ‘Now jog on and keep your stupid comments for your rich, clueless associates.’
      • ‘You are not the only person to have ever bought a season ticket, a shirt, a pie etc. and spent hours travelling up to Hull and back. Jog on!’
      • ‘You can jog on if you think I give a toss about your hurt feelings.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘stab, pierce’): variant of jag.

Pronunciation

jog

/dʒɒɡ/