Main definitions of joey in English

: joey1joey2

joey1

noun

  • 1A young kangaroo or other marsupial.

    • ‘Many of these animals require intensive care, which at times has meant Megan has had a young bird or possum joey with her at work.’
    • ‘She says once she was driving through a National Park and recognised one of the roos to be Jack, a joey she'd reared years earlier.’
    • ‘We also wouldn't have gotten the photos of the kangaroos and joeys, which was a really nice thing to find on the trail.’
    • ‘And the privacy has proved decidedly fruitful - all six female wallabies have given birth to joeys, almost doubling the park's population.’
    • ‘Kill quotas for 2001 were 5.5 million - but this figure ignores joeys, road deaths, illegal and non-commercial kills.’
    • ‘There were lots of eye-opening moments: a pride of lions up close, rhinos on guard, mummy wallaby with little joey.’
    • ‘Because it is protected in the pouch, the joeys are surviving the car accidents that kill their mother.’
    • ‘And you can't tell how many joeys they've got in their pouch when you shoot them.’
    • ‘However, the main problem with all kangaroo shooting remains the fate of joeys.’
    • ‘The joey returns to the pouch to suckle until it is weaned between 8 and 12 months.’
    • ‘In those days they used to say you couldn't nurture young joeys because you couldn't foster them.’
    • ‘The dogs had apparently zeroed in on a joey who, being younger, couldn't keep up.’
    • ‘It belonged to her joey who was doing yoga poses in her pouch.’
    • ‘After three months, the developed joey emerges from the pouch to make short trips in the outside world.’
    1. 1.1Australian informal A baby or young child.

Origin

Mid 19th century: of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation:

joey

/ˈdʒəʊi/

Main definitions of joey in English

: joey1joey2

joey2

noun

historical
  • A silver threepenny bit.

Origin

1930s: diminutive of the pet name Joe: the derivation remains unknown. The term (originally London slang) denoted a fourpenny piece in the 19th century.

Pronunciation:

joey

/ˈdʒəʊi/