Main definitions of jibe in English

: jibe1jibe2jibe3

jibe1

verb & noun

US
  • variant of gybe
    • ‘On the way down, Andy teaches us how to jibe, or turn away from the wind.’
    • ‘Many an hour was spent tacking, jibing and splicing the main brace with the occasional capsize as well.’
    • ‘Charmed Life is equipped with a refrigerator, a freezer, and a microwave, so the women can zap their meals between jibing, tacking, and swabbing decks.’
    • ‘A sail blows off the foredeck and a spinnaker drum jams so they can't jibe on the downwind leg.’
    • ‘On the second day, we practiced jibing, or passing the boat's backside through the wind.’

Pronunciation:

jibe

/dʒʌɪb/

Main definitions of jibe in English

: jibe1jibe2jibe3

jibe2

verb

[NO OBJECT]North american
informal
  • Be in accord; agree.

    ‘the verdict does not jibe with the medical evidence’
    • ‘I think this jibes with Xyu's recent contact with the Transducer which, as far as I can tell, is the most recent contact we have on record.’
    • ‘You don't agree with them, you offer opinions that don't jibe with theirs and you get a target on your back.’
    • ‘It doesn't jibe with the image that a lot of Americans have about this country.’
    • ‘This does not jibe with my experience, nor that of most Americans, at least.’
    • ‘I'd hoped to put the vignette on the web when it was done, but it doesn't jibe at all with AuthorityJack.’
    • ‘How does the rise of the big-box-booksellers jibe with the supposed decline in reading?’
    • ‘And the sample menus included in the back of Dr. Atkins's book are of no help because they don't jibe with the instructions in the text.’
    • ‘He claims to be very liberal, but when he's voting it just doesn't jibe with what he says.’
    • ‘But that doesn't jibe with your partisan rantings.’
    • ‘All the pessimism and darkness that come with a far-away war against a hard-to-find enemy just don't jibe with that mojo.’
    • ‘My own experiences didn't jibe with anything these family units went through.’
    • ‘The ‘GE to GM’ phrase just doesn't jibe with most people's sense of their options.’
    • ‘Similarly, if I'm in public practice, and they do something that doesn't jibe with my policies, I'm going to change my policies.’
    • ‘It's not like you have to share the office space with someone who's views don't jibe with yours, so what's the point?’
    • ‘But the only ‘evidence’ for these upcoming disasters is the output of computer models that don't jibe with reality.’
    • ‘It's an additional piece of information refuting Atkins-Taubes that happens to jibe with the controlled studies and the government surveys.’
    • ‘If Apple does come out with a response, they have to sink down to Napster's level and it doesn't jibe with their type of advertising at all.’
    • ‘Unknotting privacy dilemmas from first principles can be tricky, or at least lead to results that don't jibe with most people's felt intuitions.’
    • ‘An afternoon talking to the protesters, however, had filled her head with data that did not jibe with what she had been told.’
    • ‘But their working habits didn't jibe: Godrich constantly wanted to press forward, but the Strokes like to labour over every sound.’

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

jibe

/dʒʌɪb/

Main definitions of jibe in English

: jibe1jibe2jibe3

jibe3

(also gibe)

noun

  • An insulting or mocking remark; a taunt.

    ‘a jibe at his old rivals’
    • ‘Now a gaffe by the Highways Agency and the county council has left Lancastrians open to gibes from their Yorkshire neighbours.’
    • ‘The gibes from his own side caused Kerry to overreact.’
    • ‘The latest gibe between the pair came after Warne called Muralidaran ‘thin-skinned’ for pulling out of Sri Lanka's tour of Australia.’
    • ‘It began with loud jibes and insults issued at both sides, and quickly developed into a shoving match.’
    • ‘Both editors offered high-minded defences for their cheap gibes.’
    • ‘The gibes about drugs and EST aside, some people just don't ‘get’ certain innovations, and this is often generational.’
    • ‘Voltaire's gibe about the Holy Roman Empire was literally true but, like all such glib gibes missed the essential point.’
    • ‘His wife, Liz (Janet McTeer), taunts him with sexual jibes.’
    • ‘Kelly concludes with a gibe at his colleagues' casual derogation of the blogs.’
    • ‘Gospel writer John's point in putting this line in Jesus' mouth is almost certainly to take a gibe at the Temple elite.’
    • ‘Stung by Australian gibes about their dull tactics, they played like the Harlem Globetrotters - and lost to Australia 12-6.’
    • ‘On the way some had salutations for her and some had gibes.’
    • ‘His replies were peppered with small gibes at Hitchens.’
    • ‘The gibe could not be further off the mark, for he is in fact a very proud Jew.’
    • ‘There was much satisfaction in these stories: at last, the Newfoundlanders had found a vessel for the jibes that had taunted them for years.’
    • ‘Anderson might get gibes for being a pretty boy, but is respected in the bush and the cities for his grasp on his portfolio.’
    • ‘Sandra stayed at home, away from the taunts and jibes of her white schoolfellows, and illicitly befriended the children of the family's black nanny.’
    • ‘The Shakespearian gibes are by far the most creative.’
    • ‘However, at another level, the nettles may be emblematic of the comments and gibes of women and men.’
    • ‘But a caring family couldn't totally protect the young Alíesha from the jibes and taunts of schoolmates and soldiers.’
    snide remark, cutting remark, taunt, sneer, jeer, insult, barb
    dig, wisecrack, crack, put-down
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Make insulting or mocking remarks; jeer.

    ‘some cynics in the media might jibe’
    • ‘Think before you jibe, the effects may not seem much to you, but the for the recipient, well it could just push them over the edge.’
    • ‘In one day and night, he gibed, ‘all those who had any power and authority were wiped out… till no chief remained to ask after any followers.’’
    • ‘‘It was only through the media that I came to know there are such short-cuts to winning national awards,’ he gibes.’
    • ‘The 19 novels on the list represented, Sexton jibed, ‘a curious incident of authors missing’.’
    • ‘This was met with congratulations from the oldies, but the usual jibing remarks from my sister.’
    • ‘The Deputy First Minister joked at the First Minister's expense, jibing at the apparent disunity within McConnell's ranks.’
    • ‘For a man who never quite seemed humble, though he often gibed about humility, it was a moving - and humbling - final effect.’
    • ‘Today one can easily gibe at the show's glaring seams and stitches.’
    • ‘‘It's just journalists who are paid to write that stuff,’ Kadyrov jibes, naming one famous reporter who he believes is in the pay of the rebels.’
    • ‘She tipped her glass at Hector as she gibed at the Antarctic and he couldn't have enjoyed it more.’
    • ‘The compère jibed back ‘Oh, so you are are a futurologist as well?’’
    • ‘‘If corners had not been invented, we would have been in the game,’ he jibed.’
    • ‘‘It's hugely different to writing to a feature film, where you're basically whitewashing it for the producers,’ he jibes.’
    • ‘Of this character, she gibes further: ‘He takes Viagra.’’
    • ‘She crossed her arms across her chest with a defiant look as if expecting him to gibe her.’
    • ‘Zia's enterprise gibed with the blurred mission statement of Pakistan.’
    • ‘It is all very well for Tariq Ali to gibe at India's neo-liberal economics, but this, alas, is the only show in town.’
    • ‘Barnes then jibed, ‘Are you getting hot for the next one - the humanitarian attack on Pyongyang?’’
    jeer, taunt, mock, scoff, sneer
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (as a verb): perhaps from Old French giber handle roughly (in modern dialect kick); compare with jib.

Pronunciation:

jibe

/dʒʌɪb/