Main definitions of jib in English

: jib1jib2

jib1

noun

  • 1Sailing
    A triangular staysail set forward of the mast.

    • ‘Though there were as many misses as hits, the main sail, jib, and one other were burning.’
    • ‘With smooth proficiency, the trimmers backed the jib, and the mainsail was eased, swinging the bow around.’
    • ‘I have seen others opt for a cutter-type arrangement leaving the small jib and adding a genoa.’
    • ‘They were long open boats with a large spritsail and jib.’
    • ‘The rig is fractional and most boats were sold with a mainsail and 120% jib as standard equipment.’
  • 2The projecting arm of a crane.

    • ‘‘I first saw the jib and then it just crashed into the premises,’ he said.’
    • ‘Either can be equipped with hydraulic jibs; this gives the operator extended horizontal and vertical reach on both of the cranes.’
    • ‘As I mentioned before, I could not get the model to turn in a reasonable circle with the canard jibs alone, either in a glide or under electric power.’
    • ‘The immediate area around the crane is still cordoned off for safety reasons, due to the risk of parts of the broken jib falling.’
    • ‘They nested at the jib's end last spring, and have come back again.’
    • ‘The crane jib came to rest on the pontoon narrowly missing a civilian shipwright working beside Young Endeavour.’
    • ‘In yesterday's windy conditions, the front jib of the crane dangled at the former gasometer site, the damaged part swaying towards buildings.’
    • ‘The jib or projecting arm of a crane probably derives from gibbet, and gibe and gybe are often written jibe.’
    • ‘The wreck lay intact on its port side, its masts and crane jibs spreading themselves across the sand and gravel seabed.’
    • ‘In its ordinary sense it conveys to us an item of plant with a projecting boom or jib over which are braced lifting wires and pulleys.’
    • ‘Over the hangar mouth the jib of the winch can be spotted.’
    • ‘In that post I said that I managed to delete the photo of the JCB with the jib extended.’
    • ‘The 20-foot placing jib both rotates and articulates, allowing access to the pump discharge around corners and through windows.’
    • ‘Overhead power cables broke the fall of the crane as the jib of the machine tore a gaping hole in the roof of the single storey premises.’
    • ‘At least we know the roller-furled jib works, though overall it isn't exactly a great advert for Sunfast (the makers of the yacht).’
    • ‘The driver, who left the scene after the accident, jumped from the cab just seconds before the jib of the crane plunged down onto the seashore.’
    • ‘It involves the employment of a second lift cylinder on the jib or secondary boom.’
    • ‘With three telescopic boom sections and an articulating jib, sections of pump hose are added as needed to accommodate the distance to placement.’
    • ‘Finally, after setting down a bundle of rebar, the crane operator did not raise the jib line all the way back to the top.’
    • ‘A few seagulls circled, squawked at Joe, and two pigeons on the crane's jib watched him intently.’

Phrases

  • the cut of someone's jib

    • dated, informal Someone's appearance or demeanour.

      ‘I like the cut of your jib, young fellow’
      • ‘I like the cut of her jib.’
      • ‘I like the cut of your jib, son.’
      • ‘If I like the cut of his jib, I will flash him a grin.’
      • ‘I have no idea what he is talking about, but dammit, I like the cut of his jib.’
      • ‘Sir, I like the cut of your jib.’
      • ‘You can tell a man's character by the cut of his jib.’
      • ‘He liked the cut of my jib, and I also went out of my way to prove myself as an intrepid reporter.’
      • ‘Reservations have to be made on an answer phone and when and only when they like the cut of your jib will they return your call confirming entry!’
      • ‘He is reputedly a fan of Western films and, going by the cut of his jib, country-and-western music.’
      • ‘It's easy to see why the Grammy guardians liked the cut of her jib.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

jib

/dʒɪb/

Main definitions of jib in English

: jib1jib2

jib2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1(of an animal, especially a horse) stop and refuse to go on.

    ‘he jibbed at the final fence’
    • ‘The horses slithered down the shallow bank and onto the glassy surface at a rapid trot, but the black was mistrustful of the insecure footing and jibbed skittishly.’
    stop at, stop short at, baulk at, shy at, retreat from
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a person) be unwilling to do or accept something.
      ‘he jibs at paying large bills’
      • ‘Dealing with declaration one, I understood that you were jibbing at the word ‘unlawfully’ in Mr Clayton's draft.’
      • ‘Mr. Gilmartin jibbed and commented that the demand made the Mafia look like monks.’
      • ‘One may jib, like George Orwell, at Greene's belief that a brutally stupid gangster is capable of intellectual subtlety.’
      • ‘So he would just throw himself into his collar and it would never occur to him to jib or give up.’
      • ‘The amount cab owners pay for their licence could include a free access card, although few would jib at the £7 annual fee required to become a ‘gate’ user.’
      • ‘But, although I jib slightly at the supernatural Skellig's curative powers and the sentimental conclusion, the story has legs as well as wings.’
      • ‘No doubt, some purists will still jib at this usage.’
      • ‘Perhaps if the heroic hymnic patriotism had been proposed, the sarcastic young firebrand of the piano concerto (etc.) would have jibbed.’
      • ‘American scholars have jibbed at adopting this usage, and many prefer terms without the denotative baggage of caste, such as ‘status groups.’’
      • ‘That is why we jib slightly the description of this case as a negligent misstatement case.’
      • ‘It jibbed at invading England in 1940, though it did undertake a number of amphibious operations in the Baltic Sea in June 1941, and later in the Black Sea.’
      • ‘Others have jibbed at this categorisation, but I remain of the opinion that this would be the effect in legal terms of the view that no further resolution is required.’
      baulk at, fight shy of, shy away from, recoil from, shrink from, draw back from, stop short of
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 19th century: perhaps related to French regimber (earlier regiber) ‘to buck, rear’; compare with jibe.

Pronunciation

jib

/dʒɪb/