Main definitions of jar in English

: jar1jar2jar3

jar1

noun

  • 1A wide-mouthed cylindrical container made of glass or pottery, especially one used for storing food.

    with modifier ‘a large storage jar’
    • ‘If you'd prefer to be cautious, use glass jars to store leftovers or wrap foods in wax paper before wrapping them in aluminum.’
    • ‘They are urging residents to bank and not bin their festive food jars and bottles to boost glass recycling.’
    • ‘The courgettes can be grilled in advance and reheated when needed - they keep for up to a week in the fridge, stored in a jar under olive oil.’
    • ‘The 1,300-year-old skeleton it came from was found in a small garden along with a knife, a belt and some pottery jars that would have contained provisions for the after-life.’
    • ‘The vessels are all small, two-handled pottery jars and lack decoration.’
    • ‘You can trace history by finding cod bottles, ceramic beer bottles and jars, numerous items of crockery and even clay pipes.’
    • ‘Switch to reusing before recycling - glass bottles and jars, cardboard boxes and plastic soft drink bottles all have lots of uses around the home.’
    • ‘The limes are quartered, steamed, combined with oil fragrant with aromatic spices, vinegar and salt then stored in airtight jars.’
    • ‘Dump the seeds into a dry pan, sort by hand and store in airtight glass jars until you're ready to plant or eat them.’
    • ‘Each household will receive a black box to store glass bottles, jars, plastic bottles, cans, foil, aerosols, and textiles.’
    • ‘Transfer the apple sauce to clean pint jars, leaving one-half inch headspace.’
    • ‘Seal the drying salt in an airtight container such as a glass jar or plastic tub.’
    • ‘Check the seasoning, then spoon the paste into a jar and store it in the refrigerator.’
    • ‘You can eat some immediately, but, as with most pickles, this one improves with time, stored in sterilised jars.’
    • ‘If it goes ahead, each household will receive a blue sack for newspapers and magazines and a 55-litre box for glass bottles and jars.’
    • ‘Similarly, beer and soft drink cans, booze bottles and empty jars can all be recycled.’
    • ‘3 Spoon the pesto into a screw-topped jar, seal and store in the fridge for up to one week.’
    • ‘Glass containers such as soda bottles and food jars are easy to recycle because they are free from impurities and have similar melting points.’
    • ‘Excavations have found imported Mediterranean wine and oil jars and fine red tableware of C5 - C6 date.’
    • ‘You can preserve your sauce by canning it in sterilized pint jars in a hot water bath for 35 minutes.’
    earthenware container, glass container, pot, crock, urn, pitcher, jug, flask, decanter, carafe, flagon, ewer, drum, canister
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The contents of a jar.
      ‘a jar of coffee’
      • ‘She wants ‘that feminine touch,’ while I'm content with a jar of pickles and a Giants game.’
      • ‘In the early days, after meetings in McGuinness's flat on Waterloo Road, the band would reach into a jar of coins their manager kept on his sideboard for their bus fare home.’
      • ‘I have a jar of spice tea that I made last winter (again, not cooking - just mixing).’
      • ‘The curry was out of the freezer, but was originally made with chickpeas, some veggies (carrots and stuff) and a jar of organic tikka masala sauce.’
      • ‘How about if we dip our fingers in a jar of purple ink?’
    2. 1.2British informal A glass of beer.
      ‘let's have a jar’
      • ‘If you fancy a jar before the game, you could try The Arkles on Anfield Road, a large and usually packed pub with a telly and Cains bitter on draught. ...’
      • ‘Locals will tell you, Ireland's the only place to get a true pint of stout. Fancy a jar?’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French jarre, from Arabic jarra.

Pronunciation

jar

/dʒɑː/

Main definitions of jar in English

: jar1jar2jar3

jar2

verb

  • 1with object Send a painful or damaging shock through (something, especially a part of the body)

    ‘he jarred the knee in training’
    • ‘I jumped from the tree, jarring my knees with the impact and ran for the stables.’
    • ‘However, before it could complete its circuit, his arm was brought to a sudden halt, jarring his entire body.’
    • ‘An enormous pair of hands shoved my side jarring my entire body.’
    • ‘The recoil jarred his shoulder painfully, but he ignored it as best as he could.’
    • ‘He just jarred a knee a bit in that race, and it is nice to know now that he is completely sound.’
    • ‘The T & A reported exclusively yesterday that Hoggard had only jarred his knee joints and had not damaged the ligaments or muscles.’
    • ‘They had literally thrown him from the train, despite his protestations, and his whole body had been jarred.’
    • ‘Hobson was always doubtful after jarring his knee in last week's friendly with Manchester United while Jones suffered bruised ribs in Tuesday night's game with Middlesbrough.’
    • ‘The train lurched again and I was slammed against the train side, jarring my body.’
    • ‘Not only will the ball generally finish only a few yards in front of you, hitting the ground behind the ball also jars your body.’
    • ‘He has jarred his knee on the hard grounds and will be rested for tonight's friendly clash at Scarborough.’
    • ‘Fox, who jarred his knee and suffered a kick on the ankle, was today having his injury assessed by City physio Jeff Miller.’
    • ‘Do not lean back and do not attempt to ride and run at the same time, this will only jar your body.’
    • ‘She had to force her body to cooperate in every move she tried, and any sudden movement that jarred her aching body was magnified ten times more in her skull.’
    • ‘He pulled out of the Scotland squad for tonight's friendly game against Turkey in Dundee after jarring his knee in training.’
    • ‘His thoughts were interrupted by Tobin's hearty laugh, a laugh that jarred him from his stolid stance and sent him reeling with confusion.’
    • ‘Every step he took jarred her arm, sending intense pain through her body.’
    • ‘She stumbled on the stairs, tripping and hitting the ground painfully, jarring her arm under her body.’
    • ‘Meikoku, who always seemed to have extra assignments, was busy writing an essay while Hoshiko kept jarring his arm, sending the pencil skidding over several centimeters each time.’
    • ‘It was most unlike the soft earth of the oasis, and her first running steps jarred her knees and hurt her bare feet.’
    jolt, jerk, shake, vibrate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Strike against something with an unpleasant vibration or jolt.
      ‘the stick jarred on the bottom of the pond’
      • ‘While the air system is good, it fidgets badly over sharp intrusions like potholes, jarring and jolting the passengers.’
      • ‘Rob throttled the giant turbines up, and once again the aircraft was beginning to jolt and jar as it raced ahead faster and faster across the rocky terrain.’
      • ‘The whole room jarred as a sudden jolt reverberated up through the earth.’
      jolt, jerk, shake, vibrate
      View synonyms
  • 2no object Have an unpleasant or disturbing effect.

    ‘a laugh which jarred on the ears’
    ‘the difference in their background began to jar’
    • ‘His idyllic childhood in Ireland obviously jarred with teenage life in London, but both places are essential to his writing and his nature.’
    • ‘First impressions are so important yet at the height of the holiday season in East London there is a blight on the city's Esplanade beachfront that jars and jolts.’
    • ‘The simple trick of leaving the destruction of bombs to the imagination while focusing on the strange chemistry between the two men is jarring and frightening.’
    • ‘The juxtapositions of these images are meant to be jarring, to shake us out of our complacencies about medicalized birthing practices and our growing detachment from natural birth.’
    • ‘It jarred with the sweetish tomato sauce I paired it with until added chili flakes to the food.’
    • ‘There shouldn't be anything disturbing or jarring in a bedroom, even if you're using the most modern style of design.’
    • ‘The jarring notes of strings by Bernard Herrmann are now in surround sound - not that this makes any real difference.’
    • ‘I think total silence would be far too jarring - people wouldn't want to stay in a place where all they can hear is their tinnitus.’
    • ‘It's not a perfect movie as it runs a little too long and the cinematography is jarring at times, but this is a movie with strong believable characters in the lead.’
    • ‘Finkelstein applies jarring color notes reminiscent of the beautiful acidity of Bonnard, and he arrives at vibrant passages.’
    • ‘They were dressed with some overtly sweet vinaigrette (I suspect raspberry) that jarred with the savouriness of the crêpes.’
    • ‘Thirlwell uses a probing and unique narrative voice which, although jarring at times in its smug omniscience, takes us to the very centre of his characters' anxieties.’
    grate on, set someone's teeth on edge
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Be incongruous in a striking or shocking way.
      ‘the play's symbolism jarred with the realism of its setting’
      • ‘She was right to ditch the passage since it would have jarred with the spirit of reasoned debate.’
      • ‘The only jarring note in all of this is that while Dublin has prospered, the regions have been almost starved.’
      • ‘Aron's outgoing personality jarred with my current mood; it reminded me of a time when I had been as self-assuredly bold as him.’
      • ‘I know it's an odd detail to fixate on, but it just jarred with the rest of the scene.’
      • ‘After the lush greenery of that beautiful country, the starkness of northern Namibia provided a jarring contrast.’
      • ‘Likewise, editor A. Shreekar Prasad has skillfully interwoven the three plot lines and the film unwinds with great lucidity and no jarring notes.’
      • ‘However, a jarring note in the musical evening was the frequent use of English by the girl who compèred the programme.’
      • ‘There were a few jarring notes in the production, though, which stop me from hailing the series as a work of genius.’
      • ‘Multiculturalism involves the recognition of difference, which jars with the idea of equal treatment to achieve equity.’
      • ‘She gave a history lesson that jarred with many Europeans who heard it, dating the birth of the relationship between Europe and the US to World War II.’
      • ‘i think that in a world mediated by commercial image inundation, it is particularly jarring to see visuals that are incongruous with the usual profit motivations.’
      • ‘As for the Old Vic material, it's in jarring contrast to the steely professional polish that characterised Who's Next.’
      • ‘And because the script has wisely avoided writing them as stereotypically American, there are no jarring notes in the casting mix.’
      • ‘No matter how powerful and commanding your voice, it always sounds weak and feeble after loud music and graphics on a big screen, but the drama that was about to unfold really was a jarring contrast.’
      • ‘I arranged the leaves on the cushions in order, but that jarred with me, so I added a bit of chaotic stitching.’
      clashing, conflicting, contrasting, incompatible, incongruous
      clash, conflict, be incompatible, be at variance, be at odds, be inconsistent, be incongruous, be in opposition, be in conflict, disagree, contrast, collide
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1A physical shock or jolt.

    ‘the train stopped without the slightest jar’
    • ‘They tore up two of the rails, taking out the spikes, but leaving the rails in position, as they knew that the jar of the train would be sufficient to throw them out of place.’
    1. 1.1archaic mass noun Discord or disagreement.

Origin

Late 15th century (as a noun in the sense ‘disagreement, dispute’): probably imitative.

Pronunciation

jar

/dʒɑː/

Main definitions of jar in English

: jar1jar2jar3

jar3

noun

in phrase on the jar
dialect, informal
  • Ajar.

    • ‘The door was on the jar. I mounted the steps, that is as well as my trembling knees would allow, clutching at the balustrade between my swoonings.’
    • ‘They locked the body of the deceased in a box on the fourth day after the murder, and, having left the garret door open and the street door on the jar, one of the apprentices was told to call Nanny down to dinner, and to tell her that, if she promised to behave well in future, she would be no longer confined.’

Origin

Late 17th century: later form of obsolete char ‘turn’ (see also ajar and charwoman).

Pronunciation

jar

/dʒɑː/