Definition of inward in English:

inward

adjective

  • 1attributive Directed or proceeding towards the inside; coming in from outside.

    ‘inward mail’
    ‘a graceful inward movement of her wrist’
    • ‘If the singer takes a good breath and exhales on an ‘f’ sound he or she will feel the gradual upward and inward movement balanced by internal pressures.’
    • ‘You can feel it, like a thunderstorm just off the edge of the horizon, when the leaves on the trees curl inward and the air feels charged and the hair stands up on your arm.’
    • ‘Manufacturing a swamped barrel involves tapering it inward towards the center point and flaring the muzzle and breech ends outward for balance.’
    • ‘Rims of individual leaf bases oxidize first, with the oxidation front proceeding inward or across the leaf base.’
    • ‘It turned with a click, and the door swung inward to allow them inside.’
    • ‘To the lay reader, may I repeat the Government's basic proposal, which is to stop any stock moving off a farm for a 20-day period following an inward movement onto the farm.’
    • ‘It is best planted with the root ball on a slight inward angle towards your object being covered, at the same height as was potted.’
    • ‘The ‘solidification front’ then proceeded inward as the basalt continued cooling.’
    • ‘Voice is the sound produced by the inward movement of vocal cords when the air from lungs passes through and brings the vocal cords together.’
    • ‘The houses of well-to-do Mexicans have been inward looking, towards a patio, since colonial times.’
    • ‘It is a common fault for a swimmer to start turning the head for the inward breath before the forward hand has entered the water.’
    • ‘Orthotic devices also help reduce over-pronation, which occurs when the arch slopes inward, causing the outside of the heel to keel instead of remaining flat.’
    • ‘Specifically, the normally green stems began to discolor (turn brown) from the outside of the tree inward.’
    • ‘The required interval between inward and outward movements in a herd has been reduced from twenty days to seven days.’
    • ‘The best way to utilize the platforms would be to Fold the fleet into the enemy's path outside them, moving inward, with the platforms just out of range.’
    • ‘Evidently Stickel did not consider the possibility that a plumber might have dug inward from outside the building and down just enough to repair malfunctioning plumbing.’
    • ‘She turned her face inward towards his shirt, breathing in deeply, then exhaling, her breath tickling his chest through the material.’
    • ‘A large amount of matter, left over from a supernova explosion spiraling inward towards an invisible black center.’
    • ‘Researchers at the Koestler Unit think that vision may involve a two-way process, an inward movement of light and an outward projection of mental images.’
    • ‘These molecules have their headgroup regions pointing outward into the solvent and the carbon chain directed inward toward each other.’
    towards the inside, going in, ingoing
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    1. 1.1 Existing within the mind, soul, or spirit, and often not expressed.
      ‘she felt an inward sense of release’
      • ‘It was as if the outward fear and trembling inherent in the century of mass death had taken inward hold within James's own family.’
      • ‘She leaned back a bit and closed her eyes, shutting out the world and turning her mind inward…’
      • ‘His mind turned briefly inward, prodding gently at its privacy shield.’
      • ‘Is it not time they stopped looking outward with an open purse and started looking inward with an open mind?’
      • ‘He began to look inward to his soul and he discovered that he could no longer reconcile his life in the material world and his quest for higher spiritual truth.’
      • ‘We might also remark upon his buoyancy, an inward easiness of spirit.’
      • ‘The image of Saint Ambrose elevates the worshiper's mind to an inward vision through his intensity of concentration.’
      • ‘God's Kingdom wasn't a state of mind, or a sense of inward peace.’
      • ‘His mind was still fixed inward, on the self he so loathed.’
      • ‘The Ancient ones slowly became bored of our land and slowly faded away, becoming more inward and secretive, within years they were all but legend.’
      • ‘The Spirit himself endorses our inward conviction that we really are the children of God.’
      • ‘It's a place where the eye and the spirit turns inward.’
      • ‘Protagoras, Parmenides, Democritus and Socrates looked inward to the human mind and there discovered logos, Human Reason.’
      • ‘For they are the inward actions of the mind in the spirits of the braine, whilest the bodie is occupied with sleepe: for as touching the mind it selfe, it never sleepeth.’
      • ‘We'll look at all of these as we journey inward to our soul, outward to our world, and together into our community.’
      • ‘Pratyaahaar means withdrawal of senses from their objects and turning the mind inward.’
      • ‘To many what most mattered was the inward purification of the soul; sacrifices, images, and external ceremonies of any kind were a distraction, at best symbols.’
      • ‘The spiral turns inward, twisting the soul of society into an alienated artificiality.’
      internal, inner, interior, inside, innermost
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adverb

  • variant of inwards
    • ‘Thirty degree medial rotation may be seen by rolling the arm inward and turning the palm toward the body.’
    • ‘Do not roll your knees inward, toward each other.’
    • ‘With no further warning, Valdaer swung his blades inward, toward the jar in front of him.’
    • ‘As soon as the horse begins to turn, which should happen inward toward the center and you, and as his flanks are in front of you, you drive them as before by stepping in towards them.’
    inside, towards the inside, into the interior, within
    inwards, inside, towards the inside, into the interior, within
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Origin

Old English inweard, inneweard, innanweard (see in, -ward).

Pronunciation

inward

/ˈɪnwəd/