Main definitions of invert in English

: invert1invert2

invert1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Put upside down or in the opposite position, order, or arrangement.

    ‘invert the mousse on to a serving plate’
    • ‘Cool the cake in the pan for 5 minutes; then invert it onto a rack to cool completely.’
    • ‘Using oven mitts, carefully invert the pie onto a large serving plate.’
    • ‘Remove from the oven and invert the molds onto a sheet pan to cool.’
    • ‘The roof is essentially inverted or turned upside down compared to the standard roofing.’
    • ‘By building a construction yard within a completed building, the design inverts a logical order of events.’
    • ‘The ocean is indeed a magical, mysterious place, a fluid-filled negative space where mountains lay upside down and inverted, and where myth and legend have been born and bred.’
    • ‘Remove from the heat and invert the mold onto a cutting board.’
    • ‘Remove from the heat invert the pan onto a cutting board, and remove the pan.’
    • ‘We ‘control nature,’ but it continually subverts and even inverts our intentions.’
    • ‘The therapist moves the cup over the area to be treated, removes the cotton ball and inverts the cup onto the body.’
    • ‘In this sense, I think my approach to course planning inverts the usual model.’
    • ‘The postmodern movement would pick up that ideal by inverting traditional concepts of high and low art to see what new life they could squeeze out of these tired, old ideas - like soup cans!’
    • ‘In his letter On Humanism, Heidegger charges Sartre with merely inverting the Platonic order of essence and existence;’
    • ‘Thinking of language as an instinct inverts the popular wisdom, especially as it has been passed down in the canon of the humanities and social sciences.’
    • ‘Shakespeare suppresses matters irrelevant to his dramatic purpose, inverts the order of events, creates important roles for individuals of no historical importance, and telescopes lifetimes into single scenes.’
    • ‘I did the ‘snowplow’ the whole way down the bunny slope (you know, when you invert your skis into an upside down v shape).’
    • ‘To serve, cut around each slice of bread and serve each piece upside down with pineapple and juices on top (or invert the whole pan onto a large platter and cut into squares).’
    • ‘Remove the weight and invert the mold onto a serving dish.’
    • ‘Before you invert the cake onto a serving plate simply place the pan on the stove on low heat for 30 seconds.’
    • ‘Today, we invert the stability and order of our world into an unstable and dangerous mirror image.’
    turn upside down, upturn, upend, turn around, turn about, turn inside out, turn back to front, reverse, transpose
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Music
      Modify (a phrase) by reversing the direction of pitch changes.
      • ‘After a spiky fugue the Passacaglia theme is also inverted.’
      • ‘In the Gigue, Bach used the sort of chiasmus device that is often found in his binary dances, by which he inverts the basic motive of the A section as the motive for the B section.’
      • ‘Here, Grechaninov inverts the middle movements order with the slow movement coming third and this Largo is extremely well constructed.’
      • ‘Bach chorales are transposed according to strict mathematical procedures, folk tunes are inverted and piled on top of one another, and the clumsy sound of an orchestrion is produced by a small orchestra.’
    2. 1.2Music
      Alter (an interval or triad) by changing the relative position of the notes in it.
      • ‘These last two devices may be combined to form a mirror canon or canon in retrograde inversion, where the second voice has the melody backwards and with the intervals inverted.’
    3. 1.3Mathematics
      Subject to inversion; transform into its inverse.
      • ‘If you simply invert the numerator fraction and multiply it by the denominator, then you get the wrong answer; it comes out upside-down.’
      • ‘Write down the whole part as the next component of the continued fraction and invert the part after the decimal point.’
      • ‘In the proof below, we use the fact that e is the sum of the series of inverted factorials.’
      • ‘He gives the reader the same method of dividing fractions as taught in schools today, namely invert the divisor and multiply.’
      • ‘We inverted the algorithm to generate afterpulse-modified histograms from ideal histograms.’

noun

  • 1An arch constructed in an upside-down position to provide lateral support, e.g. in a tunnel.

    • ‘Forest road builders are finding that open invert or 1/2-pipe solutions are very useful for remote crossings where high fisheries values are identified.’
    • ‘Moreover, the permanent concrete invert was constructed close behind the second-stage bench excavation.’
    • ‘Usually used with an open invert, the Dur-A-Span culvert can promote fish passage even during the construction period if footings are prepared outside of the wetted perimeter.’
    1. 1.1The concave lower surface of a sewer or drain.
  • 2Psychology
    dated A homosexual.

  • 3Philately
    A postage stamp printed with an error such that all or part of its design is upside down.

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘turn back to front’): from Latin invertere, literally turn inside out, from in- into + vertere to turn.

Pronunciation:

invert

/ˈɪnvəːt/

Main definitions of invert in English

: invert1invert2

invert2

noun

informal

Pronunciation:

invert

/ˈɪnvəːt/