Definition of invasive in English:

invasive

adjective

  • 1Tending to spread very quickly and undesirably or harmfully.

    ‘patients suffering from invasive cancer’
    • ‘They can be very invasive, spreading with suckers and by stems rooting where they touch the soil but hard annual pruning will keep growth in check.’
    • ‘Sixty percent of women who are diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer have not had a Pap smear in the past five years.’
    • ‘Not a single case of invasive cervical cancer was missed with the use of HPV DNA testing in conjunction with cytology.’
    • ‘However, significant differences have been observed between endometrial cancer and invasive ovarian cancer.’
    • ‘These superficial lesions can also be treated bronchoscopically to prevent progression to invasive cancer.’
    • ‘But since the plant's seeds are sterile, the grass does not spread like an invasive species.’
    • ‘There was invasive cancer in the cyst wall and the adjacent solid areas.’
    • ‘These lesions can progress to carcinoma in situ and then to invasive cancer.’
    • ‘This finding underscores the need for careful follow-up for the development of muscle invasive cancer.’
    • ‘Amphotericin B is the cornerstone for treatment of invasive fungal infections, especially in neutropenic patients’
    • ‘‘Polyp cancers’ are defined as invasive cancers removed at colonoscopy when colectomy was not carried out’
    • ‘Battling invasive aquatics Texas has problems with harmful invasive aquatic plants.’
    • ‘If you get regular Pap tests, your chances of developing invasive cervical cancer are very low.’
    • ‘If abnormal cells are found early on, pre-cancerous changes can be treated before they become invasive cancer of the vulva.’
    • ‘After habitat destruction, the spread of alien invasive species in our countryside is one of the most pervasive threats to our native plants.’
    • ‘Only intensive cutting and repeated herbicide treatment can halt the invasive shrub's spread.’
    • ‘Why do nerve cell bundles ‘camp’ near the invasive front of colon cancer tumors?’
    • ‘No cases of invasive cervical cancer occurred in women who had at least three previously normal Pap tests.’
    • ‘It is also used by people interested in research and conservation, or those simply interested in the spread of invasive aquatic animals.’
    • ‘Intraductal proliferative lesions are associated with increased invasive cancer risk.’
    virulent, infectious, invasive, uncontrollable, dangerous, harmful, pernicious
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Tending to intrude on a person's thoughts or privacy.
      ‘the sound of the piano was invasive’
      • ‘Historically, a privacy invasion would have seemed greatest when a physically invasive observation took place.’
      • ‘All these government programs are invasive of privacy, paternalistic, demeaning, and inefficient.’
      • ‘Eavesdropping is difficult, time-consuming and invasive of privacy.’
      • ‘I mentioned this bill, and that person came up with a story about being the subject of unwanted and invasive photography.’
      • ‘The collection of a specimen is a humiliating, invasive violation of privacy.’
      • ‘Data retention is an invasive tool that interferes with the private lives of all 450 million people in the European Union.’
      • ‘If a statement might be defamatory or invasive of privacy or infringing on the publicity of a live person, I don't think that statement should be used regarding a dead celebrity.’
      • ‘Undertaking such searches is highly invasive of an applicant's privacy and potentially very damaging.’
      • ‘Noise becomes something seen, something literally invasive of privacy.’
      • ‘So it's a little bit invasive right now, and we have no privacy.’
      • ‘To those with strong networks of family and friends, such measures may seem paranoid or unduly invasive of privacy.’
      • ‘And with the average person reading up to 60 e-mails a day, this junk can easily become both intrusive and invasive.’
    2. 1.2(of medical procedures) involving the introduction of instruments or other objects into the body or body cavities.
      [as submodifier] ‘minimally invasive surgery’
      • ‘Junior nurses and healthcare assistants more involved in physical care seemed able to recognise that there was more to care than drugs, surgery, and invasive procedures.’
      • ‘Central venous catheterization is one of the most commonly used invasive procedures in critically ill patients.’
      • ‘For major invasive procedures or surgery, it may be reconsidered 12 hours after the procedure.’
      • ‘Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure that can benefit patients with serious comorbidity who are at high risk from major surgery.’
      • ‘Invasive procedures such as needle biopsies are guided by ultrasound images.’
      • ‘The new policy had the potential to touch many areas in the hospital because invasive procedures are performed in a variety of settings.’
      • ‘Patients maintained on warfarin may occasionally need to stop anticoagulant therapy during invasive procedures.’
      • ‘Most attempts to move complex and invasive procedures out of hospital completely and into patients' homes remain marginal.’
      • ‘At the same time, the likelihood of harm from false-positive results and invasive procedures and treatment is substantial.’
      • ‘Colonoscopy is an indispensable part of modern medical practice and one of the most commonly used invasive medical procedures.’
      • ‘The importance of asepsis and sterilization of instruments and supplies for invasive procedures became widely accepted.’
      • ‘Coagulopathy should be corrected when there is overt bleeding or an invasive procedure is planned.’
      • ‘But minimally invasive procedures, using instruments controlled by humans, have their limitations.’
      • ‘Neonatologists agree on the importance of pain relief for newborn babies undergoing invasive procedures, such as placement of a chest drain.’
      • ‘It also may be used in other ambulatory settings that perform surgery or other invasive procedures.’
      • ‘Some of these women regret entering a conveyor belt process that ends up with an invasive procedure that causes a high rate of fetal loss.’
      • ‘The definitive diagnosis thus requires an invasive procedure with biopsy.’
      • ‘Infants born after very short gestations and require intensive care and undergo invasive procedures are most at risk.’
      • ‘The local research ethics committee's permission must be sought before a clinician undertakes a new invasive procedure’
      • ‘For patients with grade III fixed posterior subluxation, more invasive procedures should be considered.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from obsolete French invasif, -ive or medieval Latin invasivus, from Latin invadere (see invade).

Pronunciation:

invasive

/ɪnˈveɪsɪv/