Main definitions of invalid in English

: invalid1invalid2

invalid1

noun

  • A person made weak or disabled by illness or injury.

    ‘she spent the rest of her life as an invalid’
    [as modifier] ‘her invalid husband’
    • ‘It did not make any mention of the fact that many of the people who have come off the unemployment benefit have casually moved over to the invalids benefit or the sickness benefit.’
    • ‘Our three invalids, though, in spite of languishing in the shade and in one of the few airless parts of the front garden, produce plenty of blooms that are simply too beautiful to destroy.’
    • ‘He served as a steward at Knock Shrine for 15 years and willingly gave of his time to assist the invalids and pilgrims throughout the pilgrimage season.’
    • ‘This fund was established in 1975 and each year between 30-40 invalids are taken to Lourdes.’
    • ‘A sum of over 800 was raised, which means that the committee will be able to send two invalids from the parish on the diocesan pilgrimage in May.’
    • ‘The resort, 1,500m above sea level, with a lake and exquisite views of the snowy mountains, has been a center for invalids and well-off hypochondriacs since the 1860s.’
    • ‘A benefit of living in a one-stoplight town is that the county clerk makes house calls, delivering ballots to invalids.’
    • ‘Every year, Maria goes out to Lourdes to help invalids on the Limerick pilgrimage.’
    • ‘The dates for this year's Lourdes pilgrimage are June 21-26 and the cost is €480 for invalids and €580 for all others.’
    • ‘This annual event costs €580 with special concessions for invalids.’
    • ‘Most of the invalids are in their 30s or 40s, securing life-time pensions worth 70 per cent of the final retirement-age salaries.’
    • ‘His job had been to carry invalids up the mountains from St. Louis to Cilaos for until the building of the road in 1935 it had been impossible for carriages or cars to make it up.’
    • ‘Their white colour and delicate texture have conspired to give them a reputation as a food for invalids or convalescents.’
    • ‘She was an excellent woman who loved her family and cared for her parents who were both invalids.’
    • ‘Looking after all the invalids was a team of doctors, nurses and other helpers.’
    • ‘It caters for invalids as well as hedonists, its waters famed for their efficacy with eye and bladder problems, and the menu is a gastronome's delight.’
    • ‘A nurse in Sudan and Nigeria, Catherine now spends her days in St John's Rest and Care looking after invalids and sick pilgrims who come to Knock.’
    • ‘He made many firm friends during that time and was tireless an unselfish in his commitment to the invalids and lending assistance to all who sought his help and advice.’
    • ‘Safe journey to all our invalids, helpers and pilgrims from the parish who travelled on Sunday to participate in the Annual Armagh Pilgrimage to Lourdes.’
    • ‘There are places for both invalids and pilgrims.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Remove (someone) from active service in the armed forces because of injury or illness.

    ‘he was badly wounded and invalided out of the infantry’
    • ‘The war years were marred only by Warnie's absence on active service until he was invalided out as a hopeless alcoholic.’
    • ‘Medical science still couldn't create an artificial limb that could be controlled like a natural one and Alex's father had been invalided out of the service.’
    • ‘When Anna returns from digging trenches on the Luga line, and her father is invalided out of the army, they all settle in together.’
    • ‘He was invalided out before he was posted to overseas service.’
    • ‘During the First World War he served as an intelligence officer in the navy but was invalided out in 1917, and spent a year working on dazzle camouflage for ships in Liverpool and Bristol.’
    • ‘Yet ultimately his war record in some ways echoes Longford's: both were invalided out, feeling that to some degree they had not fulfilled the call to arms.’
    • ‘By the time he reached the safety of a dressing station his wound had become infected and he was invalided out of the war and away to a convalescent hospital in Ireland.’
    • ‘The letter claimed that 1,500 sailors had been invalided out of the Navy because proper treatment cannot be afforded and that the number of military doctors is less than half its required strength.’
    • ‘But he was invalided out in 1991 with knee problems which doctors blamed climbing ships' ladders.’
    • ‘Smith had been invalided out of the army in 1949, and joined the family shipbreaking company.’
    • ‘Sir Frederick served in the Royal Ulster Rifles until 1941 when he was invalided out following an accident.’
    • ‘He first appeared in Wigtown in about 1943, after being invalided out of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, where he'd served as an officer on a sister ship of the Titanic.’
    • ‘The second covers the period from 1917 onwards when he was invalided out with shell-shock and eventually went back to the front, only to get a head-wound and be hospitalised again.’
    • ‘He was invalided out of the army with a badly arthritic knee, exacerbated by his injuries.’
    • ‘Annand was invalided out of the army in 1948 and thereafter did much work for disabled people, especially the deaf, and was involved in local affairs in the north, and above all in army affairs.’
    • ‘The war veteran this year won a landmark case against the Ministry of Defence because his pension had been wrongly taxed for 45 years after he was invalided out.’
    • ‘After the war he was invalided out of the Army because of back injuries suffered through beatings by German soldiers.’
    • ‘After being invalided out of the army, he became an Official War Artist in 1943, concentrating on the everyday life of the troops.’
    • ‘They married in 1918, after MacDiarmid was invalided out of the army with cerebral malaria.’
    • ‘He was invalided out of the Army, his marriage broke up and he commuted some of his pension entitlement for a cash sum to settle his divorce.’
    1. 1.1Disable (someone) by injury or illness.
      ‘an officer invalided by a chest wound’
      • ‘My elderly passenger was invalided with Parkinson's Disease and had suffered a stroke.’
      • ‘He was invalided home with an intolerable rash, which was diagnosed as the then unusual mepacrine photosensitivity.’
      • ‘He had a groin injury at the 1982 World Cup, dislocated his shoulder at the 1986 World Cup and was invalided home from the 1990 World Cup with an Achilles tendon problem.’
      • ‘It was composed one miserable, dreich November in a boarding house on the English south coast, where Hudson was invalided for weeks, dangerously sick.’
      • ‘I'd been to Ascot in the 1930s and in 1944 I'd just been invalided out of the rescue service and answered an advert in the Sporting Life.’
      • ‘The former Oldham Athletic defender was invalided out of the professional game shortly after making a dream move to Premiership giants Newcastle United.’
      • ‘The First Minister's father suffered such an accident and was invalided out of the pit aged 50.’
      • ‘To give him his due, the chancellor is aware of the real situation and has provided £800m for a package designed to help those who have been invalided out of the labour market back to work.’
      • ‘A violent incident in which he appears to have come close to death brought on a nervous breakdown, and he was invalided home.’
      • ‘He had a helicopter accident and fell 30 metres to the ground, injuring his knee and invaliding him out of the service.’
      • ‘Originally from Fife, Smith was with the Metropolitan police for 10 years before being invalided out at the end of the 1980s.’
      • ‘Dallaglio tells a story about the day he was invalided out of the last Lions trek in 2001 and in a way it explains how hungry he must be for what lies ahead of him in New Zealand.’
      • ‘Two years later, he suffered a stroke on the job due to the heavy workload of planning the almost completed new warehouse in Coulthard Court and was invalided out of IGA.’
      • ‘She was invalided out of South Wales Police with a stress-related illness in 1992, after being traumatised by discovering a man who had killed himself with exhaust fumes in his car.’
      • ‘My boy was invalided long ago, and carried in a litter God knows how far and how long.’
      • ‘He was invalided out of the agency after a violent incident, in which he should have died, and is reluctant to be drawn back in.’
      • ‘After concussion and trench-fever on the Somme he was invalided to hospital in Edinburgh, where he was greatly encouraged in his writing by Sassoon.’

Origin

Mid 17th century (as an adjective in the sense ‘infirm or disabled’): a special sense of invalid, with a change of pronunciation.

Pronunciation:

invalid

/ˈɪnvəlɪd/

Main definitions of invalid in English

: invalid1invalid2

invalid2

adjective

  • 1Not valid, in particular.

    • ‘Moreover, faith is not something to which the concept of ‘validity’ can be applied: it is never valid nor invalid to have faith in such and such.’
    • ‘But when they tried to claim they were told their policy - for which they had paid a monthly premium over a four-year period - was invalid.’
    • ‘On June 24, the Federal Court ruled that the land seizure was invalid - a huge setback for Canberra's nuclear dumpsters.’
    • ‘Both of these concepts undermine the ability of the working class to examine the real world around us and to differentiate between valid and invalid conclusions about it.’
    • ‘Each run consisted of 16 valid trials, 16 invalid trials, and 8 no-go trials in random order.’
    • ‘There were 117 invalid votes out of a total poll of 26978.’
    • ‘I believe that it was perfectly legitimate to pursue a belief, as Tony did, that there was something improper or invalid about the party's registration.’
    • ‘By 1800 there were perhaps less than a hundred valid names but thousands of invalid ones.’
    • ‘In the conjunction task, the error rates were lowest in valid trials and highest in invalid trials.’
    • ‘They memorized texts and thought about what was said in the texts, about whether the contents were valid or invalid.’
    • ‘But no amount of investigation of innerworldly entities can explain the difference between truth and falsity or shed any light on the distinction between valid and invalid cognitions.’
    • ‘Each judge, said Marei, will prepare a written statement showing figures concerning how many voters the station included, how many voted and the number of valid and invalid votes.’
    • ‘It's not an invalid view, but it's not the only view.’
    • ‘But Clark challenged the legality of the suspension in the Federal Court last year, and the court found that the minister's actions were invalid.’
    • ‘This analysis confirmed significantly longer reaction times for the conjunction task than for the feature task, and for invalid trials than for valid trials.’
    • ‘The vast majority were returned for being invalid.’
    • ‘The two Lourdes committees for Clogh and Moneenroe have confirmed that names for the invalid section on this year's diocesan pilgrimage must be in immediately.’
    • ‘Until we find a way of exercising some control over the hypotheses to be admitted, our definition makes no distinction whatsoever between valid and invalid inductive inferences.’
    • ‘However, these cards are otherwise ordinary and follow all the rules regarding valid and invalid plays.’
    • ‘Boo's excuse that he was off the island was invalid.’
    1. 1.1(especially of an official document or procedure) not legally recognized because it contravenes a regulation or law.
      ‘the vote was declared invalid due to a technicality’
      • ‘To the extent that Part 14 of the regulations falls within the zone of exclusive federal legislative power, the State regulation must be invalid.’
      • ‘In simple words this means they do not have licences at all because an invalid document is not a licence to drive.’
      • ‘This time, with the women there, the soldiers let him through, but he was afraid to go with the invalid permit.’
      • ‘He claimed the proceedings were a sequel to the 1991 raid in which his home had also been ransacked but which had been illegal as an invalid warrant had been used.’
      • ‘He is being held on suspicion of traveling with an invalid passport, but Bosnitch said Fischer was never notified by the U.S. government that his passport was revoked.’
      • ‘Cases 635, the Court held invalid the second marriage of a Muslim when the first marriage had not been dissolved, although pursuant to Islamic law the second marriage was valid.’
      • ‘Therefore the threats will be justified unless the patents are invalid.’
      • ‘Chanyut and Santsak also said the students disqualified as being invalid an unusually high number of ballots that had been marked for the Chart Thai candidate.’
      • ‘Looking at the Margo Lake warrant, any information as to the location of the vehicle by monitoring the tracking device should be excised as having been obtained by an invalid warrant.’
      • ‘For the second time in recent US history, voters have had their ballot papers discarded as invalid.’
      • ‘This would have affected his decision to issue the warrant and results in a finding that the warrant was invalid and should not have been issued.’
      • ‘Mr Shipley's argument is that the defendants entered into the settlement on the basis that the patents were invalid.’
      • ‘He's been detained in Japan since mid-July, when he was nabbed for traveling with an invalid passport.’
      • ‘He produced an invalid passport and failed to inform the officer that it was not valid.’
      • ‘We believe the Rambus patents are invalid, not infringed and unenforceable.’
      • ‘But in truth, they are not purporting to tell the American public, say, that one of their patents is invalid or that the scope of its claims is not what it might appear to be.’
      • ‘He's absolutely right that these arrest warrants and these search warrants were invalid.’
      • ‘They just gave up half a billion for invalid patents on an obvious idea, after the company that might not own those patents had to pay off another company to license them.’
      • ‘Traffic officials would conduct random roadblocks, cracking down on offences such as vehicle overloading, drunken driving and invalid licences.’
      • ‘The Tralee-based judge was acquitted of being in possession of child pornography earlier this year after the trial judge ruled that a search warrant was invalid.’
    2. 1.2(especially of an argument, statement, or theory) not true because based on erroneous information or unsound reasoning.
      ‘a comparison is invalid if we are not comparing like with like’
      • ‘Mills says that this argument is invalid, because a physical event can have features not explained by the event which is its sufficient cause.’
      • ‘No need to be surprised - a theory is invalid if shown to be so beyond reasonable doubt.’
      • ‘This argument is invalid, and all invalid arguments are unsound.’
      • ‘Eighty years after Wallace's book, our universe could not be more radically different, yet human hope continues to impose the same invalid argument upon it.’
      • ‘He glared at him daring him to pursue this as an invalid argument.’
      • ‘Not that the arguments are invalid; but they cannot prove the conclusion, if they cannot prove it except to someone who already accepts it.’
      • ‘The argument is manifestly invalid as there is no way that can be derived from (a).’
      • ‘This argument for fatalism does not commit the same fallacy (that is, use the same invalid argument) as the first one that I gave.’
      • ‘So the knowledge argument is invalid because it involves a fallacy of equivocation: ‘know’ means something different in the two premises.’
      • ‘Improper induction and therefore invalid argument, cried a geeky voice in Jocelyn's head.’
      • ‘But the fact that such arguments are deductively invalid does not mean that they are not sometimes inductively strong.’
      • ‘This is not to say that a scientifically unproven theory is invalid.’
      • ‘Second, we can try to show that the conclusion does not follow from the premises, and thus the argument is invalid, proving nothing.’
      • ‘Or maybe they just know enough thermodynamics to understand why Sewell's arguments are totally invalid.’
      • ‘If an argument is invalid, there is no deduction for it in the system.’
      • ‘Any philosopher can tell you this is an invalid argument.’
      • ‘But this objection is invalid because there is a universal test of true knowledge, and this test’
      • ‘Thus, recourse to tradition in abstract, speculative argument is invalid.’
      • ‘Keynes also makes an invalid argument, claiming that a fall in the nominal wage rate may not decrease the real wage rate but would rather increase the rate of unemployment.’
      • ‘If it is the latter then the protests are invalid simply because pen to paper would restore the balance.’
    3. 1.3(of computer instructions, data, etc.) not conforming to the correct format or specifications.
      • ‘Systems bound to the old version of the service suddenly find their message formats invalid.’
      • ‘Not all of the techniques will work cross-browser, so sometimes your code will be invalid.’
      • ‘This incents gaming at the company level, contribute invalid data for erstwhile competitors while using your real graph for search.’
      • ‘If some of the HTML markup is invalid, some authors may become discouraged from providing valid HTML code.’
      • ‘Over time, programs installed onto your computer can bloat the System Registry with invalid entries.’
      • ‘An invalid entry is merely erased and the cursor is returned to the beginning.’
      • ‘The Corporation announced that an invalid SSL certificate that web sites use is required to be installed on the user computer to use the https protocol.’
      • ‘As a result, the search engine attempts to retrieve an invalid URL and fails to index any of the content served by that script.’
      • ‘When I attempt to boot the program, I receive a message stating there is an invalid system disk.’
      • ‘Now anything I put in the CD drive or floppy drive comes up with an invalid system disk error.’
      • ‘He notices the password is invalid and went back and informed the customer that he just needed to reset the login password.’
      • ‘Users who try to pass an invalid e-mail address are shown an error message that tells them what to change.’
      • ‘If any invalid entries are detected, flashing arrows appear next to the input fields and a popup dialog box describes the specific problems.’
      • ‘On the new browsers, invalid CSS may break your page just as invalid HTML will.’
      • ‘It seems to default to either redrawing the menu or logging out if you select an invalid menu option, which again can be confusing if you're not in a harmless text editor.’
      • ‘If the command-line options are invalid or the configuration file has an error, Synergy writes an error message to the shell and quits.’
      • ‘I can't get signed into the internet it keeps saying invalid username and password.’
      • ‘It's possible for an invalid and very long file name to pass the include safety check, resulting in a file name bigger than its intended buffer, and obviously a buffer overflow.’
      • ‘A better strategy would be for the recipient to bounce the e-mail back to the sender, creating the illusion that the e-mail address was invalid.’
      • ‘Automatically lock accounts or access paths after a preset number of consecutive invalid password attempts.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (earlier than valid): from Latin invalidus, from in- not + validus strong (see valid).

Pronunciation:

invalid

/ɪnˈvalɪd/