Definition of intoxicate in English:

intoxicate

verb

  • 1[with object] (of alcoholic drink or a drug) cause (someone) to lose control of their faculties or behaviour.

    ‘he was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated’
    • ‘Drug tests were also performed, but the affidavit concluded he was intoxicated by alcohol only.’
    • ‘Furthermore, I had seen Jessica's behavior when she was intoxicated, and certain stories were probably embellished a little.’
    • ‘He had been drinking, but he was not intoxicated.’
    • ‘I have never been able to catch that feeling again, and I think it was mostly due to the fact that I was completely intoxicated, after not much more than a plastic cup of alcohol.’
    • ‘The group was intoxicated and were drinking in public, and Christie asked them to clean up and take their party elsewhere.’
    • ‘We don't allow people into sessions if they are intoxicated by alcohol or drugs.’
    • ‘Obviously she was pretty drunk because when I'm intoxicated I'm not exactly the most attractive guy in the world.’
    • ‘They were highly intoxicated or on drugs, it's difficult to tell.’
    • ‘If a large quantity of a given drink intoxicates, then a small quantity of that drink is forbidden.’
    • ‘The mixed drink should not have intoxicated him, but if one drinks enough of any kind of liquor, drunkenness is sure to follow.’
    • ‘This test is not satisfied by evidence that the defendant had consumed so much alcohol that he was intoxicated.’
    • ‘He was intoxicated beyond his mind from the high amounts of alcohol he consumed.’
    • ‘Kids who abuse inhalants often look and act as if they're intoxicated from drinking alcohol.’
    • ‘So what we've attempted to do is look at the living, working brain, using a functional MRI scanner, while people are intoxicated either with alcohol or marijuana or combinations of the drugs.’
    • ‘Yes, but you don't get tired, your feet don't hurt, the beer only intoxicates you if you let it, and every woman that you'll see will be smoking hot.’
    • ‘I do a lot of these cases and all of the abuse in this case happened when Paula had an alcohol problem, when she was intoxicated.’
    • ‘It seemed it didn't take much to get his friend drunk as a skunk, and though he'd never actually seen her tipsy before, the stories about her while she was intoxicated were legendary.’
    • ‘The person is intoxicated through alcohol or drugs’
    • ‘If you are intoxicated it can be quite hard to explain the situation in a coherent way.’
    • ‘Was the bar responsible for serving him alcohol when he was already intoxicated?’
    drunk, inebriated, inebriate, drunken, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence
    blind drunk, dead drunk, rolling drunk, roaring drunk, as drunk as a lord, as drunk as a skunk
    sottish, gin-soaked
    tight, merry, the worse for wear, pie-eyed, three sheets to the wind, plastered, smashed, hammered, sloshed, soused, sozzled, well oiled, paralytic, wrecked, wasted, blotto, stewed, pickled, tanked up, soaked, blasted, ratted, off one's face, out of one's head, out of one's skull
    legless, bevvied, brahms and liszt, half cut, out of it, bladdered, trolleyed, mullered, slaughtered, lashed, well away, squiffy, tiddly, out of one's box
    fou
    loaded, trashed, out of one's gourd, blitzed, ripped
    jacked
    pissed, rat-arsed, arseholed
    monged, monged out
    in one's cups, lit up
    tired and emotional
    sotted, foxed, screwed
    crapulent, crapulous, bibulous, ebriate
    inebriate, make drunk, make intoxicated, make inebriated
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Excite or exhilarate (someone)
      ‘he became intoxicated with his own power’
      • ‘Sheer delight ensued as all were intoxicated with its merrymaking!’
      • ‘We were intoxicated by the peaceful power we had.’
      • ‘When she was certain that the embrace intoxicated him enough, she moved quickly and grasped the knife from his belt and pulled away harshly.’
      • ‘The excitement and anticipation of the opportunity intoxicated him.’
      • ‘‘As a teenager, I was intoxicated, drunk on the words,’ he says.’
      • ‘I am so thrilled and honored and grateful and humbled and privileged and intoxicated by this wonderful opportunity to ask you a brief question on this celebrated historic occasion.’
      • ‘He was intoxicated by the sheer colour and vibrancy and lushness of language Thomas used to describe childhood and the countryside he grew up in.’
      • ‘I started watching it, and I became totally intoxicated by it.’
      • ‘Language intoxicated Vijayan; he delighted in the rhythms of Malayalam and its versatility in evoking the many moods of native landscapes and feeling.’
      • ‘In his later teens, he became intoxicated by the accordion styles of the great press and draw players, notably Joe Cooley, Jackie Daly and Tony McMahon.’
      • ‘Journalists quickly become intoxicated by the ether of war and all the excitement and danger that awaits on the front line.’
      • ‘That old book smell intoxicated me for so many years - as a teenager, college student, and grad student - then I forgot about it.’
      • ‘War, he explained, simplifies and focuses life; it offers purpose and thus exhilarates and intoxicates; it is, in the words of Hedges's title, a ‘force that gives us meaning.’’
      • ‘I am intoxicated by the smell of the earth, after the first hint of rains, not for hurting you, but for giving my senses immeasurable pleasure.’
      • ‘Winter comes much earlier in the province, and snow blankets some of its cities while much of the rest of the country is still intoxicated with the delights of autumn in October.’
      • ‘About five years ago, when Tibet was still a cinematic subject of highest fashion, I was too intoxicated by my own interest to watch these films with an objective eye.’
      • ‘I was intoxicated by so many smiling, happy faces.’
      • ‘The gang of trouble-makers moved straight into the crowd which was intoxicated by the throbbing music and snatched from among them a young girl and pinned her to a settee.’
      • ‘Romantic notions of serving his country and fighting heroically intoxicated him.’
      • ‘No it's not an obsession, it is the fact that never has a footballer's sheer skill so intoxicated me as that of the spindly-legged waif from Belfast.’
  • 2archaic Poison (someone).

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘poison’): from medieval Latin intoxicare, from in- into + toxicare to poison, from Latin toxicum (see toxic).

Pronunciation:

intoxicate

/ɪnˈtɒksɪkeɪt/