Definition of intellectualize in English:

intellectualize

(also intellectualise)

verb

  • 1[with object] Give an intellectual character to:

    ‘belief was a gut feeling—it couldn't be intellectualized’
    • ‘She said she did not intellectualise music and let the violins just wash over her.’
    • ‘People respond to a look, to the bond between actors - but I hate to intellectualise it.’
    • ‘There's this whole trend to try to intellectualise it, but you just can't.’
    • ‘However, let it be known that I'm not merely trying to snobbishly intellectualise things.’
    • ‘I can intellectualize it and think about what I might do.’
    • ‘It has been intellectualised, bureacratised and paid for!’
    • ‘I could easily intellectualize the tragedy by arguing that the U.S. had provoked it.’
    • ‘I've tried to intellectualise this addiction.’
    • ‘Performance artists are always so goddamn self-important and intellectualizing everything they do.’
    • ‘If you think about the answer, verbalize it or intellectualize it, you will never get the answer.’
    • ‘She doesn't like to intellectualise things too much and thinks we don't rely on our emotions and instincts nearly enough any more.’
    • ‘They intellectualize it until you realize why they spend so much time alone ‘writing dissertations.’’
    • ‘The French can intellectualise anything - food and drink, football, being and nothingness.’
    • ‘Then I had to go back to school where everyone was analysing and intellectualising everything.’
    • ‘But I am intellectualizing this book, which can only give you the experience of dislocation viscerally, through the flow of its language.’
    • ‘‘I just don't have the answers so it's not a question of me not wanting to talk about something; it's more that I can't intellectualize my work’.’
    • ‘It puts graffiti into a new context that intellectualizes the motivations of the artists.’
    • ‘My work is never meant to be intellectualised.’
    • ‘I think these questions and the temptation to over intellectualize the installation are an unfortunate distraction.’
    • ‘I intellectualize facts, process them, shake my head at them.’
  • 2[no object] Talk, write, or think intellectually:

    ‘people who intellectualize about fashion’
    • ‘It's one thing to theorize and intellectualize about such things, but very difficult to realize that it actually can happen.’
    • ‘You can intellectualize all you want, but if you don't ‘feel’ confident that someone will catch you at the bottom, you aren't going to jump.’
    • ‘If you ponder or intellectualize, the film slows down.’
    • ‘So I think the attempts to try and intellectualise about the game are misjudged.’
    • ‘But if my goal is to intellectualise - to write academically - then I think in English and write accordingly.’
    • ‘We do not have to intellectualize about why this happens - we know that people are passionate.’
    • ‘I envied the animals for their absolute lack of pretense and their unwillingness to intellectualize.’
    • ‘Often I have a gut feeling about something or somebody, but I think a lot of people have a tendency to intellectualise too much.’
    • ‘Most of the time, it's not enough to sit in a room and intellectualize about markets.’
    • ‘In this film, Allen doesn't seem to be trying to intellectualize about God or morality, nor does he attempt to do anything overly comedic or complex.’
    • ‘We can talk about dance and intellectualize about it forever.’
    • ‘When it comes right down to it though, Wingo would much prefer not to intellectualize about art.’
    • ‘Be willing to intellectualize about China at the drop of a hat.’
    • ‘I could intellectualise, of course I could, tracing influences and references and justifications.’
    • ‘This is a movie that doesn't make you think, ponder, or intellectualize about any of its story or characters.’
    • ‘Anna said that she can intellectualize about her relationship with Martin now; the passion has cooled to the point where she could walk away if she wanted to.’
    • ‘We don't really intellectualize, or concentrate on anything else other than making the music.’
    • ‘If one wants to intellectualize about Gallo's work, it doesn't make especially rigorous sense.’
    • ‘All he can do is to intellectualize about this experience, sympathizing with it the best he can.’
    • ‘I intellectualized further, and realized that there was a distinction between two kinds of being ‘left alone.’’

Pronunciation:

intellectualize

/ɪntəˈlɛktʃʊəlʌɪz/