Definition of insinuate in English:

insinuate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Suggest or hint (something bad) in an indirect and unpleasant way.

    with clause ‘he was insinuating that she slept her way to the top’
    ‘dirty, insinuating laughter’
    • ‘Look, not to insinuate anything, but do you realize that you've been talking about them the entire time?’
    • ‘Are you insinuating something about garbage collectors?’
    • ‘I insinuated the only time anybody thought the team was going to win was in her dreams.’
    • ‘And anyone reading the weasel words of doubt that are insinuated throughout this text can only have profound concern about the basis for which Britain is to go to war.’
    • ‘I don't like what you're insinuating Maggie!’
    • ‘I'm not insinuating anything, well; if I am it's just the truth.’
    • ‘Some actors I work with, guys that really aren't qualified, would tell you how to do something, or imply something, insinuate something.’
    • ‘China does not prevent religious expression, as is insinuated in your article.’
    • ‘Instead it says to fairly represent all sides of a dispute by not making articles state, imply, or insinuate that only one side is correct.’
    • ‘Natalia asked angrily, turning toward him and stopping her work, her eyes burning with intensity, appalled that he would even insinuate something like that.’
    • ‘It is further insinuated by your article that our employees were ‘excavating a trench, using a backhoe.’’
    • ‘The latter is different: barbed, energetic, smarmy, loud, dirty, assertive, insinuating.’
    • ‘He has implied it, insinuated it, hinted it, and intimated it, but he has not suggested it.’
    • ‘I've had patients insinuate something like that when we have to go through a few different blood pressure medications to find the right one for them.’
    • ‘I'm not trying to insinuate anything, but you know, they are from Texas…’
    • ‘But the film doesn't make any derogatory remarks (or insinuate anything offensive) against women.’
    • ‘But it appears to be afraid to tackle such issues head-on, and instead hints and insinuates at the possible problems and considerations.’
    • ‘He was angry that Mr. Jacobs would even insinuate such a thing.’
    • ‘I didn't think he'd been insinuating anything.’
    • ‘Piper would never skip school, if that's what you're insinuating Dr. Gennaro.’
    imply, suggest, hint, intimate, whisper, indicate, convey the impression, give a clue, give an inkling, allude to the fact, make reference to the fact, let it be known, give someone to understand, give someone to believe
    View synonyms
  • 2Slide (oneself or a thing) slowly and smoothly into a particular place.

    ‘I insinuated my shoulder in the gap’
    • ‘It was thick and you could see, by the porch lights, wispy tendrils insinuating themselves around plants and patio furniture.’
    • ‘That Morris' own photography, like his writing, insinuated itself with considerable artistry into the vernacular culture he revered was a matter he preferred not to discuss.’
    • ‘The Saturday Show BBC1, 9pm Justin Timberlake slides in to insinuate himself on his new single.’
    • ‘He was clearly good at insinuating his ideas into some of the housemate's heads so that he could recruit them into his plan.’
    • ‘He played them brilliantly, without insinuating a trace of sinister charm or humour.’
    • ‘The idea of providing black students with ‘role models’ is counterproductive because it insinuates the notion that you can be inspired only by people who look like you.’
    • ‘Would someone please like to explain to me how this change has been insinuated into our Scottish system?’
    • ‘The road insinuates itself along the cliffs and coves leading to Anglesea where I found Victoria's oddest golf course.’
    • ‘But evidence of how far Glesca has already insinuated itself in the English language was presented earlier this year when Home Counties girl Jade Goody made the word ‘minging’ a cult catchphrase.’
    • ‘He insinuates a languor of sun-mist and lustre into his modish Arcadia: a region of roses, felicitously painted, and ruins sketched on his Italian journeys, all against the backdrops of the opera-ballets of his time.’
    • ‘Tim said he also received some criticism for insinuating his personal problems into an official function.’
    • ‘The inhumanity of the cyberworld and the robot seem to be insinuating their way into what we thought of as our ‘deepest’ humanity.’
    • ‘Using the threat of capital flight as a lever, international capital insinuates itself deeper and deeper into these economies.’
    • ‘‘Not many clubs allow you to bring your dogs,’ Auberon Waugh said with satisfaction as he patted a Labrador that had insinuated itself under our table.’
    • ‘It insinuates its genetic material into the cell and tricks its intricate reproductive machinery into assembling thousands of new viral particles, usually at the expense of the cell's own survival.’
    • ‘Musicians have the gift of melody, they can insinuate something into the culture.’
    • ‘In a world in which there are so many kinds of media, insinuating one's brand name into people's everyday lives via word of mouth has become an increasingly powerful force.’
    • ‘But I think the difference here is that the ads are insinuated into the content automagically, and the authors are not being paid to make the comments.’
    • ‘Show them that he is insinuating himself there.’
    • ‘He manages to insinuate his arm, first around the back of the sofa and then, gradually, around her shoulders.’
    slide, slip, manoeuvre, insert, edge, work, move into position
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1insinuate oneself into Manoeuvre oneself into (a favourable position) by subtle manipulation.
      ‘he insinuated himself into the king's confidence’
      • ‘According to this, their operatives have insinuated themselves into many communities along Kenya's Indian Ocean coast.’
      • ‘Despite her artistic success and ability to insinuate herself into positions of power, however, Uma fails to maintain a stable alternative identity, even as Parvati.’
      • ‘I mean that is - I think it's the height of irresponsibility for anybody to be insinuating themselves into this case who isn't one of the law enforcement agencies.’
      • ‘He was already insinuating himself into Brian's professional life for his own gain!’
      • ‘By insinuating himself into the French nobility, he systematically destroys the men who manipulated and enslaved him.’
      • ‘They skillfully insinuated themselves within striking distance of their targets.’
      • ‘While trying to blend in at Chrysler, Zetsche is slowly insinuating himself into Detroit's clubby community.’
      • ‘So, the degree to which outsiders can and should insinuate themselves into legally protected relationships becomes an important issue for psychiatry and other medical specialties.’
      • ‘Catholics had to be prevented from insinuating themselves into the apparatus of the state.’
      • ‘By manipulating the Government, by insinuating themselves into Government positions they became bureaucrats and have done it through bureaucratic and administrative policies.’
      • ‘Whatever nasty stuff has been going down in the town of Loomis gets worse as he insinuates himself into 12-year-old Charlie's life.’
      • ‘Lopez tries to find Dell, but ends up trying to insinuating himself into Dell's family and replace him.’
      • ‘Posing as an unrequited admirer of the daughter, Pattie, Martin insinuates his way into the Bates' home.’
      • ‘Though he's not initially invited, a wild ruffian named Kikuchiyo insinuates himself into the ranks of the warrior class.’
      • ‘Manipulative and conniving, Evie has driven a wedge between Tracy and her mother, Melanie, while at the same time insinuating herself into Tracy's home and school life.’
      • ‘And fifteen years from now, once we have actually done those things, we will finally have the resources required to permit us to insinuate moles into their top brass.’
      • ‘At every opportunity, Marita pretends to defend Catherine while insinuating herself into David's confidences.’
      • ‘Claiming that even normal childhood behaviour is a mental ‘disorder’ and that drugs are the solution, psychiatrists and psychologists have insinuated themselves into positions of authority over these children.’
      • ‘Eyeing his father's money with growing envy, his fourth son tried to and succeeded in insinuating himself into his father's favour.’
      • ‘More trouble comes in the form of Puja (Lucy Tulugarjuk, who now lives in Edmonton), Oki's flirtatious and manipulative sister, who insinuates herself into Atanarjuat's family.’
      worm one's way into, work one's way into, ingratiate oneself with, curry favour with
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Origin

Early 16th century (in the sense ‘enter (a document) on the official register’): from Latin insinuat- ‘introduced tortuously’, from the verb insinuare, from in- ‘in’ + sinuare ‘to curve’.

Pronunciation

insinuate

/ɪnˈsɪnjʊeɪt/