Definition of innards in English:

innards

plural noun

informal
  • 1Entrails.

    • ‘The sternum had been split open, the innards eaten, the legs pulled inside out, and the bones picked clean, ribs snapped off at the spine.’
    • ‘The rest of his torso felt strange; he could feel his innards shifting, the bones changing as to make him rounder.’
    • ‘If you like innards, steak and kidney pie is worth a try.’
    • ‘Heavy sickness infected his innards and closed up his throat.’
    • ‘I try to teach the children lessons about the sanctity of life as the fish, sucking for oxygen, lose their heads and innards.’
    • ‘Slit open the belly of the fish and use your thumb and your fingers to draw out the remaining innards.’
    • ‘Shiny, moist reds throughout the canvases evoke surgical photos of innards pulsing with circulating blood.’
    • ‘He'll disown me, hire thousands of assassins to torture me, tear out my innards, gouge my eyes, stab me in my gut, tear me apart limb to limb, then kill me.’
    • ‘These little beasts can take up residence in your gut and other assorted innards and live parasitically from you for many, many years.’
    • ‘Running from neck to thigh, the bloody laceration tore his flesh, showing more of his innards than could be wanted.’
    • ‘Haggis traditionally contains sheep innards such as lungs and hearts, and this dish is clearly not for those whose stomachs are of a delicate disposition.’
    • ‘It made his innards ache and his heart squeeze tightly with pain to feel the only woman he loved refuse him that deeply.’
    • ‘The healer pretends to dig his hands into the patient's innards and pretends to pull out ‘tumors’.’
    • ‘Fighting against her grip, I pull my hand out of the innards, and struggle against the urge to vomit.’
    • ‘Hill struggled under the horse's weight, the stench of burnt flesh and innards assaulting his nose like a locomotive.’
    • ‘Grasp the squid's head and innards as far inside the body as you can; pull gently.’
    • ‘The thing's head was crushed and it's black innards splattered.’
    • ‘The sheer magnitude of the force behind Joren's leg was enough rupture the man's innards and send him flying off into a tree.’
    • ‘He could feel himself changing, deep inside, he could feel his innards moving around, readjusting, transforming.’
    • ‘The first they chanced upon was a portly, unshaven soldier with dried blood over his lifeless body, and flies swarming around his innards that were exposed.’
    entrails, internal organs, vital organs, viscera, intestines, bowels, guts
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    1. 1.1 The internal workings of a device or machine.
      • ‘He had a special key to do this and only he was allowed to fiddle with the innards of the machines.’
      • ‘Its electronic innards were designed by engineers in Waukesha, in Hino, Japan, and Buc, France.’
      • ‘The strings drone and yawn as if they were the innards of some great machine that makes everything turn.’
      • ‘Wear-resistance is good for slides, cylinders of revolvers and innards.’
      • ‘The booklet gives you a run-down on the innards of your car engine and at the end, there is a test for your ‘automobile IQ’.’
      • ‘But when you're done you can see the innards of the machine while you use it.’
      • ‘It was a magnificent machine - black and heavy with cast-steel innards, nothing plastic there.’
      • ‘Halfway between the wrist and the elbow, some of the android's metallic innards could be seen.’
      • ‘The Cord Company was so short of time to get to the Motor Show, they managed to produce 100 cars for shows, but none of them had any innards in the gearboxes.’
      • ‘Life is short-you can feel it slipping away while you scrabble at the fax machine's innards, ink cartridge in hand.’
      • ‘If anything, it would serve only to knock something in its electronic innards loose.’
      • ‘He took his laser pencils and disassembled the camera's innards.’
      • ‘Trouble is, the counter top has to be taken down to give the gas man access to the innards of the boiler.’
      • ‘The wedge-shaped pride of the Imperial fleet will be build out of aluminium, so we'd suggest that it just has to contain the innards of a Power Mac G5.’
      • ‘The electronic innards were just fine, but I broke a plastic stud the frame mounts to.’
      • ‘However, it is those same batteries that can do untold damage to the electronic innards of today's cameras.’
      • ‘Paul felt the electrical heat radiating from the dark pit of its innards.’
      • ‘The wallpaper snaked itself in silver and green ribbons across the screen as the mechanical chimes sounded from the innards of the computer.’
      • ‘Each had a Pulsarian engineer working its innards from beneath the craft.’
      • ‘To get this kind of software up and running you have to get your fingers dirty, messing with the innards of Internet servers.’
      machinery, workings, works, movement, motion, action, gear, gears, wheels, components, motor, engine, power source
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Origin

Early 19th century: representing a dialect pronunciation of inwards, used as a noun.

Pronunciation

innards

/ˈɪnədz/